A number of Americans may have believed that Dan Quayle was a drag on the 1988 presidential campaign ticket, but the senator from Indiana didn't see it that way. Quayle had even considered running for president. In an interview with Baltimore Sun columnist Roger Simon during the campaign, Quayle said, "I think Marilyn and I had a one-minute conversation one time whether I would even perhaps, maybe, sometime run myself in 1988. And in this one-minute conversation, I just dismissed it, said no, not this time. George Bush is there, we'd have to take two years away from the family."

Simon reports his campaign flight interview in his new book, "Road Show," with the provocative subtitle borrowed from Adlai Stevenson, "In America Anyone Can Become President. It's One of the Risks We Take." Simon, who has reported on every presidential campaign since 1976, contends that the vice president is not a joke and points out that in 1996 he'll be only 49 years old. "He will be tanned. He will be fit. And he will be ready to run." Out and About It's surprising that there wasn't a rush to defend the barricades when Sen. Ted Kennedy showed up Tuesday night at the Heritage Foundation, that bunker of conservatism. No one had ever seen him there before. It wasn't, however, anything sinister, and Kennedy wasn't defecting from his party. He was there to attend a reception for conservative columnist Cal Thomas's new book, "Uncommon Sense." It was Thomas, incidentally, who once introduced Kennedy to Jerry Falwell, leader of the now-moribund Moral Majority, and the two men developed an unexpected friendly relationship. Kennedy has enjoyed teasing Thomas and once signed one of Thomas's books, "Cal Thomas usually says the far right thing instead of the right thing, but I like reading him anyway" ...

Syndicated columnist Jack Anderson is now seen about town, especially near his offices at 16th and P streets NW, carrying a walking stick. It isn't an affectation or meant to help him walk. Anderson was mugged last month and robbed of $100 in the middle of the afternoon near his office, and the cane, with a heavy brass handle, is his new equalizer ...

The most talked about show in town is the SRO "Richard III" at the Folger Theatre, mainly because of a stunning, unique interpretation by actor Stacy Keach in a punishing schedule of eight performances a week. Unfortunately for theatergoers hoping to see him, Keach was in bed with a fever Tuesday and his understudy, Bernard Cummings, substituted. Keach returned to the stage last night ...

During the glory years of the Russian czars, French was the language of society and anything French was the standard. All these years later, the French magazine Paris Match has printed a Russian-language edition. Muscovites bought up the first 150,000 copies at about $5.50 each in the first 10 days. Another 100,000 copies sold out in Kiev and Leningrad. There was a cover story on Presidents Francois Mitterrand and Mikhail Gorbachev. But then maybe the real attraction was the photographs of bare-breasted dancers from the Lido ...

"This town is a back-stabbing, scum-sucking, small-minded town, but thanks for the money." -- Roseanne Barr, in an ad in the Hollywood Reporter's 60th anniversary edition ...