Another sight to add to that ever-growing list of things you didn't expect to see: the Soviet ambassador and the FBI director enjoying the ballet from the president's box at the Kennedy Center. Last night was the opening of the Washington Ballet's season in the Opera House, and in the box were FBI Director William Sessions and his wife, Alice, and new Soviet Ambassador Alexander Bessmertnykh and his wife, Marina. It was the Washington social debut for Bessmertnykh, who has spent a considerable amount of time at the United Nations and in Moscow since coming here in September.

The Washington Ballet leaves for Moscow Oct. 26 for a two-week tour and Bessmertnykh has agreed to be the honorary chairman of the company's fund-raising gala in the spring, which will be chaired by Susan Eisenhower and Dorothy McSweeny, vice president of the Washington Ballet. Eisenhower and National Endowment for the Arts Chairman John Frohnmayer and his wife, Leah, were also in the presidential box. Out and About

Actress Sally Struthers, best remembered for her role as Gloria Stivic in television's "All in the Family," was one of 10 recipients of the Presidential End Hunger Awards yesterday in the Old Executive Office Building. Closely identified with the plight of malnourished children worldwide, Struthers received her award from Agency for International Development Administrator Ronald Roskens, in a ceremony co-hosted by "Hunter" television actress Stepfanie Kramer. Struthers talked about her surprise in learning she was to receive the honor. She was working on a "Murder, She Wrote" episode when her publicist called to say, "President Bush has just given you an End Hunger Award for 1990." Struthers said she stood there in silence and her publicist asked, "Hello, Sally, are you there?" Struthers answered with concern, "Does the president know I'm a Democrat?" ...

For all those who bought Donald Trump's first book, "The Art of the Deal," hoping to learn how to make piles of money, there's another lesson on the way. Rupert Murdoch, the Australian mogul who knows how to make money and keep it, has a book coming out. Random House has bought the U.S. and Canadian rights to his yet-untitled autobiography to be published in 1991, Murdoch's 60th-birthday year. The book will outline his major business battles, his successful "invasion" of the United States, where he bought the New York Post, New York Magazine and the Village Voice as well as 20th Century Fox and Metromedia's television stations. It also will outline his theories of success, his views of women in business and his philosophy of hiring and firing, including the well-publicized fights with famed editors Harold Evans and Clay Felker ...

It was a last ovation for the flamboyant musical genius Leonard Bernstein yesterday as more than 100 fans applauded his casket as it was taken, after a private funeral service, from the Dakota apartment house in Manhattan, where he had lived, to a waiting hearse. He was taken for burial alongside his wife, Felicia, in Brooklyn's Greenwood Cemetery. Bernstein died Sunday at 72. No word yet on a memorial service ...

Country singer Willie Nelson, who knows a few things about drugs, was in Kentucky for a fund-raising event for Democrat Gatewood Galbraith, a lawyer whose campaign for governor urges a "hemp-based economy" with heavy taxes on legalized marijuana that would help pay for state programs against "hard" drugs. "I don't think there's any big secret how I've felt about cannabis {hemp or marijuana} over the years," Nelson said. "The biggest killer on the planet is stress, and I still think the best medicine is and always has been cannabis" ...