Jesse Jackson may be a new shadow senator from the District of Columbia, but by choosing not to run for mayor, he could have ruined his future political chances. In the December issue of GQ magazine, Washington writer Michael Kelly (who did that tough piece on Sen. Edward Kennedy earlier this year) has interviewed a number of friends and enemies of the ubiquitous Jackson. Former Democratic National Committee chairman John White, one of Jackson's top advisers during his 1988 presidential campaign, said the 49-year-old activist blew his career by not running for mayor of D.C. "If he ever wanted to be the nominee of the party, here was his chance to prove himself. {But} this diversion throws everything out the window."

Democratic Party Chairman Ron Brown, who was Jackson's 1988 convention manager, says it a little differently: "It's a human tragedy more than anything else. Here is a guy who is brilliant, got great political instincts, been right on most of the issues ... but as happens so often, not only in politics but in life, he just might not be the right message carrier." Out and About Friday night was a happy one for Canadian Ambassador Derek Burney, who had invited several Washingtonians to Capital Centre to watch the Capitals lose to the Montreal Canadiens 4-3. Among the guests in the political crowd were Ron Brown, DNC chairman; Ken Duberstein, former White House chief of staff; Ed Rollins, co-chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, and his wife, Sherrie, director of news information for ABC News; Veterans Affairs Secretary Edward Derwinski; Frank Fahrenkopf, former chairman of the Republican National Committee; and Dave Gergen, editor at large of U.S. News & World Report ...

Celebrity hairdresser Robin Weir is back on the job after spending two weeks at St. Joseph's Hospital in Baltimore, where he was being treated for ulcerative colitis. Weir said yesterday that two weeks without solid food thinned him down considerably, but added that when he received a handwritten get-well letter from former client Nancy Reagan, "that got me extra jello from the nurses" ...

Longtime Reagan spokesman Mark Weinberg, who was with the former president at the White House and has worked for him in California, has announced he is returning to Washington. After 10 years with the Reagans, Weinberg said he will be setting up a communications consulting firm in partnership with Florence Grace, who also has worked at the White House. The company is to be called Weinberg Grace Communications ...

Hospital Report: Oscar-winning actor Burt Lancaster is reportedly resting comfortably at Los Alamitos Medical Center, where he was admitted Friday after suffering a stroke. The 77-year-old star, who won an Academy Award for his performance as an evangelist in "Elmer Gantry," has some speech impairment and weakness on his right side, according to a family spokesman. Lancaster has starred in more than 60 films, most recently "Field of Dreams," "Local Hero" and "Atlantic City" ...

Elizabeth Taylor certainly does have star power. People magazine has done another cover story on her in the current issue, her 29th cover on that magazine ...

Hang on to the toasters and wall plaques and hold off checking to see where the bride has registered for her china: According to a Hindu leader in Bali, the long-awaited wedding may not have been legal. The leader says that the Mick Jagger-Jerry Hall nuptials were illegal because parts of the Balinese wedding ceremony were merely imitated. Jagger and his publicist have yet to be heard from on this new development in the long relationship ...