Who knows what it really means for President Bush, but Congressional Quarterly's Insight Newsletter says Senate Minority Leader Robert Dole isn't backing his president as often as he used to. In 1989, he supported Bush 94 percent of the time, according to CQ's annual study of Hill voting records. But this year Dole was with the president only 80 percent of the time. He did, however, vote with what is termed the "conservative coalition" of Republicans and Southern Democrats 95 percent of the time. The 100-percenter in that vote category was Texas Republican Phil Gramm, who was loyal to Bush only 78 percent of the time.

Among Democrats with possible presidential stars in their eyes, Lloyd Bentsen, Sam Nunn and Chuck Robb voted with the conservatives: Bentsen, 89 percent; and Nunn and Robb, each 78 percent. Democrats have some clear ideological choices. At the other end of the list, Al Gore, the man who would be president if he could, was the senator most loyal to his party, supporting Democratic positions 93 percent of the time and opposing Bush 62 percent of the time. Tom Harkin, a name that sometimes comes up in the presidential candidate guessing game, voted against the conservatives 92 percent of the time and, at 78 percent, was second only to Paul Simon in opposing Bush the most in the Senate. Out and About

Effi Barry, the estranged wife of Mayor Marion Barry, is one of four Washingtonians to have made People magazine's "25 Most Intriguing People of 1990." She shares the distinction with President Bush, Gen. Colin Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Anthony Fauci, the National Institutes of Health's chief of AIDS research. Effi Barry is described as being the model of "wifely decorum," who stood by her man during the mayor's 6 1/2-week trial last summer and then said "enough" and moved out with their son, Christopher, to a Connecticut Avenue NW apartment. Pictured on a chaise longue wearing an elegant evening dress, she is quoted as saying: "I'm trying to do the right thing, and I'm just going to take it one step at a time" ...

Jim Sterba, veteran Wall Street Journal Asian affairs expert, was married Saturday to Pulitzer Prize-winning author Frances FitzGerald at St. James Church in Barbados. FitzGerald, a New Yorker writer, won her Pulitzer for her book about Vietnam, "Fire in the Lake." That book also won a National Book Award and the Bancroft Prize for History. She is also the author of "America Revisited" and "Cities on a Hill." Her mother is Marietta Tree, the first woman to hold the rank of U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Her father, the late Desmond FitzGerald, was a deputy director of the CIA. Sterba, who worked for the Washington Star in the late 1960s, was for a number of years a foreign and national correspondent for the New York Times. It is the first marriage for each ...

French filmmaker Roger Vadim, who has been wed to a series of beautiful actresses, has married for the fourth time to still another actress, Marie-Christine Barrault, 42, who achieved international fame in the 1975 film "Cousin, Cousine." Vadim, 62, was once married to sex kitten Brigitte Bardot and launched her career in the movie "And God Created Woman." Among his other brides were Oscar winner Jane Fonda, with whom he had a daughter, Vanessa; and actress Annette Stroyberg. He also has a son, Christian, with ageless beauty Catherine Deneuve. The wedding took place Friday outside Paris, and Vadim said Barrault seems to be the perfect woman: "Marie-Christine represents the exact, delicious synthesis of everything I've been looking for until now" ...

Milestone: Former First Lady Lady Bird Johnson was 78 on Saturday ...