"The Godfather Part III" may be receiving mixed reviews around the country, but it beat out every other film this year by taking seven nominations yesterday for the 1991 Golden Globe Awards. Frequently a bellwether of the prestigious Academy Awards nominations, the Globes are selected by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. The dark final film in the Godfather saga was nominated for Best Dramatic Motion Picture as well as awards for best actor, Al Pacino; director, Francis Ford Coppola; supporting actor, Andy Garcia; and screenplay, written by Coppola and Mario Puzo. It was also nominated for original score and the original song "Promise Me You'll Remember."

Martin Scorsese's hit gangland film "GoodFellas," which has already won the Los Angeles Film Critics Association and the New York Film Critics best-picture honors, received five Globe nominations, including best picture. The second most nominations -- six -- went to Kevin Costner's "Dances With Wolves." Among them, it was nominated for best picture; with Costner nominated for both best actor and best director; and Mary McDonnell for best supporting actress. Out and About

It's a twist on discovering a star at Schwab's drugstore in Hollywood. Only Martin Feinstein, the Washington Opera's general director, could find a soprano at his dentist. It turns out that Feinstein's dentist, Bernard Kirshbaum, has a receptionist who works to support her singing lessons. Feinstein heard Patricia Wulf sing at the Prince George's Opera and asked her to audition. After heeding his advice to work on her high C, she auditioned again, and tomorrow she opens in the major role of Papagena in the Washington Opera's new production of "The Magic Flute" ...

Maryland's Gov. William Donald Schaefer, not considered a quiet man, says the thing he wants most when he is sleeping away from home in a hotel is a quiet room. Schaefer's comments are part of a survey of congressmen, mayors and governors in Lodging Magazine, the publication of the American Hotel & Motel Association. Virginia Gov. Douglas Wilder says he appreciates hotel employees who are not overbearing and recognize his need for privacy. The city's mayor-elect, Sharon Pratt Dixon, says she likes the in-room movies ...

For all those people who think former billionaire Donald Trump is down and out, the egocentric, mega-developer disagrees. In an interview yesterday in the Wall Street Journal, he said: "Mark my words, in 12 months I will be worth more than I was two years ago." And the man who loves seeing his name in print has apparently become more modest. He grumbled: "I'm a private guy. The newspapers shouldn't be doing a story a day on Donald Trump. There are other developers out there, and they're getting killed much worse than I am." That may be true, but they are not out and about as often with the blonde of the week ...

All the speculation that spy thriller author John le Carre will be out of business now that the Berlin Wall has come down is of little concern to the British writer. Speaking at a black-tie dinner recently in Tulsa, le Carre said: "I find myself reading my professional obituary. 'Poor old le Carre,' goes the refrain, 'what will he write about now that his Berlin Wall is down?' " In answering the question he said, "The vast industry of mutual surveillance that grew up alongside the industry of mutual destruction is not about to disappear. The spies, like the weapons, are here to stay. And proliferate, sooner or later, whether we like it or not" ...