Excerpts from the first book on Marion Barry will hit the newsstands this week in the February issue of Penthouse magazine. From the book by Washington writer Jonathan Agronsky, the chapter run in the magazine is a complete account of the fateful night the former mayor was arrested at the Vista Hotel. Agronsky, son of newsman Martin Agronsky, describes his book, titled "Marion Barry: The Politics of Race," as a "quasi-biography."

In the excerpt, Agronsky writes that the Vista Hotel sting had the rare personal approval of FBI Director William Sessions and that Attorney General Richard Thornburgh had given his verbal approval. Agronsky also writes that President Bush was approached by an unidentified "high ranking black leader" after the arrest to work out a plea bargain deal. According to what Agronsky describes as a "reliable source in the civil rights community," the president replied: "No, I'm not going to intervene. I want him to go to jail."

Out and About In the category of "life's most embarrassing moments": AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland was in Warsaw at the invitation of Solidarity to witness the swearing-in of Lech Walesa as Poland's president Dec. 22. Sitting there with the other VIPs, Kirkland, who doesn't speak Polish, couldn't hear his interpreter with all the noise. Being a savvy politician, Kirkland decided to watch everyone else: When they applauded, he applauded. At one point, the audience broke into a lively applause and Kirkland joined in. His interpreter quickly interrupted him with, "You can't clap now, he's praising you" ...

Hospital Report: Comic Rodney Dangerfield was hospitalized in Hollywood yesterday after a New Year's Eve performance at the Sunrise Musical Theater. According to a hospital spokesman, the 69-year-old entertainer would permit the hospital to say only that "he is here." The spokesman said tests were being performed and that Dangerfield's condition was stable ...

World chess champion Gary Kasparov has announced that he will donate his diamond-studded trophy in the shape of a "K" -- worth an estimated $1 million -- to a charity helping homeless Armenians. At yesterday's awards ceremony, Kasparov said to a standing ovation, "Feeling the responsibility of being one of them, I believe that this symbol of my victory should help them {Armenians}. That is why I have decided this trophy in the nearest future will be sold at a charity auction and all the money will be distributed among those people." Kasparov won the match Monday in Lyon, France, and received $1.7 million of the $3 million prize money in addition to the trophy ...

Sometimes even actors are autograph collectors. Martin Sheen, in the Dallas Morning News newsroom for an upcoming miniseries, "Touch and Die," in which he plays a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter, met the real thing: reporter David Hanners, a Pulitzer winner for a 1988 story detailing the investigation of a private airplane crash in poor weather. Hanners signed his autograph to Sheen: "To Martin: Don't fly when it rains" ...