Former president Ronald Reagan and his wife, Nancy, will be in town at the end of March for ceremonies at George Washington University marking the 10th anniversary of the assassination attempt on Reagan's life. He will be presented with an honorary doctor of public service degree March 28 during ceremonies in Lisner Auditorium. The assassination attempt took place March 30, 1981.

Reagan was treated for his gunshot wound at George Washington University Hospital, where, as part of the Reagans' visit, a plaque honoring Nancy Reagan will be placed in the emergency room waiting area. It is to recognize her "courage and strength" during the president's hospitalization. It will also be announced that the hospital is establishing the Ronald Reagan Institute of Emergency Medicine. This will be only the second time the Reagans have been in town since they left the White House. They were here in November 1989 for the unveiling of their White House portraits. The White House press office said a meeting between President Bush and Reagan is not on the schedule but that it is not unlikely.

Out and About

There was just time for a little culture before the Super Bowl. Vice President Quayle, his wife, Marilyn, and their three children showed up Sunday afternoon at the Cineplex Odeon Outer Circle to see Mel Gibson's "Hamlet." There was a scattering of applause when the Quayle family arrived and, in the best of protocol, the audience remained seated at the Secret Service's request until the family left the theater at the end of the movie ...

Tony Award-winning classical actor Fritz Weaver, easily recognized from his numerous movie and television roles, will be coming to the Shakespeare Theatre at the Folger to play the title role in "King Lear," which will run April 23 through June 30. Weaver replaces Philip Bosco, who was scheduled to play Lear, and who now, according to the Folger, has a schedule that "precludes his appearing in Washington at this time." Weaver, who has been in several Broadway productions, worked under Folger Artistic Director Michael Kahn at the American Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford, Conn., where he played the title roles in "Hamlet" and "Macbeth," directed by Kahn. He has been in such films as "Creepshow," "Black Sunday," "The Demon Seed" and "Marathon Man," and the television miniseries "The Holocaust" and "The Martian Chronicles" ...

A responsible newspaper will correct a mistake, even if it takes 200 years to do it. On Dec. 25, 1791, the British newspaper the Observer reported on the death of "the celebrated German composer" Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, saying that he had died 10 days earlier in Vienna, Austria. In its correction, published Sunday, the weekly wrote: "We are now able to confirm that the composer died on Dec. 5 and was, in fact, Austrian. As today is his birthday, we should like to take this opportunity to apologize to the composer's family for any distress." Not being completely willing to accept all the blame itself, the Observer added, "We should like to point out that news traveled more slowly in those days and the previous day's Times {of London} committed the same error" ...