If Donald Trump isn't going to be generous, or can't be, ex-wife Ivana Trump is going to be out there on the speaking circuit raking in big fees for herself. Although she has now signed with the William Morris Agency, she is not being advertised as speaking on a topic she knows best: being the dumped wife. Neither is there any indication that she will speak on her other area of expertise, shopping for $100,000 dresses in Paris and other fashion capitals.

Instead, the flier sent to "meeting planners" that announced the signing modestly describes the Czechoslovak blonde as "the personification of the 1990s' Renaissance woman." It went on to describe her as a world-renowned businesswoman, entrepreneur, author, fashion designer, philanthropist, athlete and mother. She is president of the Plaza Hotel and CEO of Atlantic City's Trump Castle, and was recently named "hotelier of the year." She reportedly "has several books" awaiting publication in 1991. It's amazing she ever finds time to shop or get her hair done. And how will she ever have time to travel and speak? Randy Chaplin, who was listed as the person to call at William Morris on Ivana's topics and fees, said he wasn't permitted to talk about either.

Out and About

The love-gone-sour legal battles between former Redskins superstar Joe Theismann and longtime housemate starlet Cathy Lee Crosby are getting tough. In December the former quarterback filed suit in federal court in Alexandria over property the couple own together in Santa Monica, Calif., and in Loudoun County. He wants to sell the Santa Monica house and buy full ownership of the farm for himself, but Crosby had refused to sign off on either property. Now Crosby has been heard from. She's filed suit in Los Angeles Superior Court seeking $4.5 million, claiming the golden-boy quarterback abandoned his promise to support her financially. The suit says the couple agreed six years ago to "forever combine their financial resources ... to financially support each other and to act in each other's best interests as friends, confidants, companions and advisers." She also wants a share of Theismann's 9.2-acre piece of land in the Virgin Islands and his condominium in South Bend, Ind. Douglas Fleming Jr., Theismann's lawyer, said his client's earlier lawsuit is about a private business agreement. "It was most unfortunate that the lawsuit was necessary, but the parties could not agree on a number of contested issues," Fleming said. "Ms. Crosby apparently has chosen to respond by alleging that Mr. Theismann owes her a support obligation. Ms. Crosby's allegation is completely without merit and will of course be vigorously contested by Mr. Theismann" ...

Signalman 3rd Class Bernie Schwartz (better known to civilians as actor Tony Curtis) was just one of the former sailors at last night's U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation dinner at the Grand Hyatt Hotel, along with actors Ernest Borgnine and George Peppard, Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, Secretary of the Navy Lawrence Garrett and former secretary Sen. John Warner (R-Va.). The foundation's 1991 "Lone Sailor" award for public service by a Navy veteran was presented to President Bush, who accepted via videotape, and to Adm. Arleigh Burke and Illinois Appeals Court Justice William White, one of the first black naval officers. The dinner raised $150,000 for the memorial's new visitor center on Pennsylvania Avenue, scheduled to open this summer ...

Rosemont, the historic Berryville, Va., home of the late senator Harry Flood Byrd Sr., is for sale with an asking price of $2.65 million. The 80-acre estate and 25-room, 9-bath manor house has been in the Byrd family for 61 years and has hosted such famous guests as Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon and Gen. George C. Marshall, as well as actors James Cagney, Bing Crosby, Van Johnson and Lucille Ball. The house was built in 1811, and a Greek revival portico with 10 monumental Doric columns was added in 1840 ...

D.C. shadow senator Jesse Jackson has come under harsh criticism from respected entertainer Harry Belafonte. In an interview in the February issue of Penthouse magazine, Belafonte suggests Jackson's dominance "has seriously impaired our ability as a people to look around ... to see if we shouldn't ... be developing 10 or 20 other people" as leaders. He said he wonders if Jackson "is truly out there to lead in the highest moral sense or if he's out there for personal gain" ...