Katie Couric, slated to replace Deborah Norville as co-anchor of the "Today" show later this month while Norville is on maternity leave, revealed yesterday that she, too, is pregnant ...

Couric, 34, is the wife of Jay Monahan, an attorney with Williams & Connolly here. The baby, expected in July, will be the couple's first ...

She is national correspondent for "Today," but since the start of the crisis in the Persian Gulf last August, has been focusing on the Pentagon, her longtime beat for NBC News. She spent some time in Saudi Arabia last year for the network ...

Norville expects her child the first week in March ...

Couric said yesterday she will join Bryant Gumbel as co-anchor on the NBC morning show probably through April, when Norville is due to return, before returning to her assignment as national correspondent until early summer ...

Couric had so far revealed her pregnancy to only a few close friends, but yesterday, after rumors began circulating in New York, she reluctantly decided to go public ...

She and husband Jay "are thrilled and excited by the prospect," she told a reporter. "Both of us are from large families -- I'm one of four children and Jay is one of seven" ...

News divisions big and small continue to adjust to the dictates of the Persian Gulf War ...

Channel 5 here announced yesterday that starting this weekend it is moving its Sunday night news half-hour back to 10 for the first time since March 1988, when parent Fox Broadcasting expanded its Sunday primetime programming ...

"Comic Strip Live" will air at 11 p.m. starting Sunday following the 10 o'clock news -- anchored by Ron Gardner -- and the half hour of Sports Extra ...

WTTG general manager Tom Herwitz said yesterday the switch was "the sensible thing to do. If we have a 10 o'clock news during the week our Sunday show should be at 10. ... It's especially important now given the situation in the gulf. We're just delighted -- it will give the people in Washington a chance to get up-to-date an hour earlier on Sunday" ...

He pointed out that news audiences are way up since the crisis -- and that Wednesday night's news hour drew a 17 Nielsen rating in the first half hour ...

PBS's "MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour," meanwhile, announced yesterday that starting tomorrow evening at 6, it will air a regular one-hour edition, anchored by Judy Woodruff ...

The past two weekends, because of the outbreak of the war in the gulf, the PBS program -- co-produced by WETA and WNET in New York -- has been on the air Saturdays and on one Sunday ...

The Woodruff-anchored program will apparently be a regular Saturday feature for the duration ...

Channel 26 yesterday said no decision has been made about scheduling of the two cooking shows -- "Louisiana Cookin' " and "Today's Gourmet" -- that are being preempted by the NewsHour. The programs are part of a 6-to-8 block of food preparation half-hours so "the block will have to be reshuffled somehow," according to a WETA spokesman. A decision is expected early next week ...

Speaking of the PBS news program, the sixth annual Congressional Staff Survey, conducted by the Fleishman-Hillard Inc. public relations firm, has named the NewsHour "the most credible of the network evening news programs" ...

A survey of senior aides in 351 congressional offices last month showed 27 percent named the NewsHour, 22 percent "ABC World News Tonight," 19 percent "CNN World News Today," 13 percent "NBC Nightly News" and 12 percent "CBS Evening News." Another 8 percent named other programs or did not have an opinion ...

Barry Chase, vice president for programming at PBS, is leaving later this month to develop new programming and production projects ...

Chase -- reportedly backed by PBS president Bruce Christensen -- had been a top candidate for the new PBS super programming chief's job that finally went to former Corporation for Public Broadcasting program director Jennifer Lawson last year, after opposition to Chase surfaced from powerful regional PBS networks ...

Chase and Lawson had worked well together when she was at CPB but insiders said that it was "inevitable" that Chase would eventually want to move on after Lawson's appointment ...

During some 15 years at PBS Chase was responsible for dozens of important programs and series -- including "Frontline," "Eyes on the Prize," "Vietnam: A Television Story" and the recent triumph "The Civil War" ...

In Other News

NBC management got the good news yesterday that eight of the local units of the National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians voted to accept the network's four-year contract offer, which has been on the table since last March ...

However, four locals -- three in Chicago and a small one in new York -- rejected the offer. NABET's negotiating committee said ratification by all 12 units is required. The union notified NBC of the vote and said it would try to schedule meetings "to resolve the rejected contracts" ...

Voting was light among the 2,000-plus NABET members. The overall vote was 853-342 with the majority of those approving the contract in engineering and technical jobs, which comprise most of the membership at the network. NABET also represents news writers and producers at NBC ...

The Washington unit voted in favor of acceptance ...

Channel 4 producer Margie Ruttenberg also got some cheering news yesterday. The former Channel 7 producer had not been included in the nomination of WJLA's late-night series "Marion Barry: His Day in Court," for a local Emmy submitted by Seven to the local chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences last week ...

Under NATAS rules, each Emmy nomination can include only three names. "Marion Barry" anchor Dale Solly, editor Joy Galane and a third party (whom nobody at Seven yesterday could recall) were listed with the nomination that was submitted Jan. 25 ...

Ruttenberg had produced and helped create "Marion Barry" under the direction of then-news director Bob Reichblum ...

When she learned that current news director Gary Wordlaw had left her name off the nomination for the program when it was submitted with many others last week, she complained to Wordlaw, who told her that because she now worked for a rival station in the Washington market, her name would not be included ...

"I didn't think that was a valid reason," Ruttenberg said yesterday, especially, she said, when the news director also refused to let her submit a nomination independently because the series concept was owned by WJLA ...

Ruttenberg then wrote to Fran Murphy, chairman of the local NATAS awards committee, formally contesting the WJLA application ...

At Murphy's behest, Wordlaw agreed to look further into the matter and yesterday, in a memo to WJLA news staffers, he said Ruttenberg would be included on the nomination, along with the special series's anchor Solly and editor Galane ...

In his memo, Wordlaw spelled out his directive that if a person in the news unit goes to a competing station in the market the name would not be included. The rule does not apply to freelancers or talent subsequently working outside the market ...

"That's the rule every place I've ever worked," Wordlaw said yesterday. He said he had no input for the original nomination. "It was prepared by middle managers; top management doesn't have a role in such selections," he explained ...

"Marion Barry: His Day in Court" aired at midnight on WJLA from June 4 until the August verdict in the mayor's drug and perjury trial ...

Linda Ringe was executive producer of the program. Ruttenberg was producer of the 11 p.m. news at Seven until she resigned in November to become producer of the "7:30 Headline News" at Four for broadcast weeknights on WFTY ...

"I was real disappointed," Ruttenberg said yesterday. "The opportunity to win an Emmy comes once in a lifetime" ...

After the announcement by Wordlaw yesterday that she was included, the producer said, "I think it was the right thing to do. I'm very pleased" ...

Murphy, herself a freelance producer, said "this type of question has never come up before in 33 years at the local nominations that I know of" ...

This year's nominations for news and other categories will be judged by local units in New York, Miami, Los Angeles and Philadelphia. The finalists will be announced in early April and winners at the annual dinner in early June ...

News nominations will be judged by the New York local, according to Murphy ...

Thank goodness, they're still thinking globally while acting locally out at Channel 26: In December WETA staffers collected 2,037 pounds of paper, a saving of 17.1 trees. Total trees saved at WETA since March 1990: 208 ...

And finally, for you TV Column fans who just wouldn't feel right without a couple of Ratingzzz this morning, "The Movie Awards" on CBS Wednesday night between 9 and 11 averaged a 9.5 national Nielsen rating and a 15 share. So did the earlier "48 Hours" program on the war in the gulf. Captain Airwaves, after a long bout with his abacus, insists that as a result CBS wound up with an overall primetime rating of 9.5/15 ...

NBC won the night with a 13.3/21, ABC did a 12.7/20 and each ratings point represents 931,000 TV homes ...