When Labor Secretary Elizabeth Dole became one of the first members of President Bush's Cabinet to leave and took the position of president of the American Red Cross, there was speculation that she was going for the money -- the Red Cross job pays $200,000, a pretty good increase since a Cabinet secretary makes $99,500. Dole put that rumor to rest by announcing yesterday, her first day on her new job, that she will work the first year without salary.

Dole, who was also secretary of transportation during the Reagan administration, explained that "volunteers ... are the heart and soul of the Red Cross, and the best way I can let volunteers know of their importance is to be one of them -- to earn the patch on my sleeve. Therefore, during my first year as president, I will accept no salary." Dole is the first woman president of the Red Cross since the organization's founder, Clara Barton, who volunteered her services. Dole will presumably begin drawing her salary next year.

Out and About

Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf is really a celebrity now that he has made Spy magazine. In the article, the Persian Gulf War commander is shown in a photograph from the upcoming book "Harry Benson's People," in which celebrities such as Burt Reynolds, Helen Gurley Brown and Jerry Falwell are photographed in or on their beds. "Stormin' Norman," his troops will be thrilled to know, sleeps under a camouflage bedspread ...

Jewell Robinson, who is an understudy in Arena Stage's new production about the effects of AIDS on a black family, "Before It Hits Home," is the sister of television anchor Max Robinson, who died of AIDS in 1988. Robinson performed the role of Maybelle Saturday and is expected to substitute for Sandra-Reeves Phillips again Feb. 15, when the lead actor will be away for a previously scheduled performance. Robinson said she is dedicating her work in the production to the memory of her brother. She is also to be a guest panelist on Arena's Signature Series forum about AIDS on Feb. 17. She has another brother in the Washington area, Randall Robinson, the head of TransAfrica ...

Hospital Report: Rep. Silvio Conte is recovering at the National Institutes of Health, where he had a blood clot removed from the right side of the brain Friday. NIH would not list his condition. The 69-year-old Massachusetts Republican awakened Friday with flulike symptoms and then began to experience a loss of feeling in his left hand. He was rushed to NIH for immediate surgery. His recuperation is expected to last through the February Presidents Day congressional recess ...

Actress Suzanne Somers, who grew up in a family in which several members were alcoholics, spoke to a group of Washington women at a breakfast yesterday at the Four Seasons Hotel on the effects of addiction on families. Somers, who is to testify today before the Senate subcommittee on children, family, drugs and alcoholism, spoke at the breakfast hosted by Gail Berendzen, wife of former American University president Richard Berendzen. Among the guests were Kena Shoval, wife of the Israeli ambassador; Dottie Blackmun, wife of Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun; Andy Stewart, wife of the late Supreme Court justice Potter Stewart; Honey Skinner, wife of the transportation secretary; and Annie Glenn, wife of Sen. John Glenn ...

President Bush was obviously in good humor when he joked with reporters yesterday. He was enjoying the unseasonably warm weather while jogging on the track at the Naval Observatory, carefully ignoring reporters' questions. On one of his last laps, Bush held up his fingers in a "V" symbol and asked, "Know what this is?" One reporter suggested "Peace?" and another, "Victory?" "It's how Julian {sic} Caesar ordered four or five beers," Bush explained. You probably had to be there ...