FBI Agent John Douglas, the "real-life" Jack Crawford of the heavily hyped new film "The Silence of the Lambs," is writing his own book. "Lambs" and "Red Dragon" author Thomas Harris interviewed Douglas while working on his bestsellers, and based his fictional Special Agent Crawford on him. Douglas was also the official FBI liaison to "Lambs" director Jonathan Demme and helped coach the film's stars Jodie Foster and Scott Glenn, who plays the Douglas character, on how to act as FBI agents. He even coached actor Ted Levine, who plays Buffalo Bill, the film's serial killer.

Douglas, a 20-year FBI veteran, heads the National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime, located at the FBI Academy in Quantico, and figures prominently in the novel and the new movie. Douglas has investigated more than 2,000 homicides and is a recognized expert on serial killers. He has had lengthy interviews with such famous criminals as Son of Sam David Berkowitz, Charles Manson, Richard Speck and Sirhan Sirhan. Douglas will organize his yet untitled Delacorte Press book according to the types of crimes he has dealt with. There will be a section on rape, one on assassinations, one on terrorism and several other sections on murder. Douglas is writing the book with successful Washington author John Greenya, whose most recent book is "Blood Relations" and who has also helped superlawyer F. Lee Bailey with his books.

Out and About

If baritone Malcolm Walker, who is making his U.S. debut Saturday when the Washington Opera production of "Manon" opens at the Kennedy Center, looks familiar to soap opera fans, there's a good reason. It's not that Malcolm is in a television soap, but because his twin brother, Nicholas Walker, plays Max Holden in the daytime soap "One Life to Live." Nicholas, the older brother by 10 minutes, was in town recently for a celebrity cooking demonstration at the Woodies in the Fair Oaks shopping center and has promised a return visit to see Malcolm perform sometime during the "Manon" run ...

Edvard Tchivzhel, associate director of the Soviet State Symphony, which has been on a six-week tour of the United States, defected Sunday afternoon before the orchestra performed at the Kennedy Center. The 47-year-old Soviet, his wife and 4-year-old son contacted U.S. immigration officials, who flew them to Greenville, S.C., to live with a family who had helped them make contact during the tour. Citing the unrest in the Baltics, Tchivzhel has applied for political asylum ...

Hospital Report: Rep. Les Aspin is in Denver's University Hospital in stable but serious condition after being admitted to Vail Medical Center Tuesday night suffering from breathing problems. He had gone to Colorado for a vacation. A spokesman for the hospital said the 52-year-old Wisconsin Democrat has hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which is described as an overgrowth of muscle tissue in the heart that impairs its ability to pump blood out of the exit valves. The condition can cause a buildup of fluid in the lungs. He is to undergo further tests and is expected to remain hospitalized through the weekend ...

Kirk Douglas, the 74-year-old Hollywood veteran, is in stable condition in a California hospital after the helicopter he was in collided with a stunt plane yesterday. Douglas suffered only cuts and bruises, a Santa Paula Memorial Hospital spokesman said; "he'll be doing just fine." Douglas was later transferred to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The helicopter's pilot, Noel Blanc, son of the late Mel Blanc, the voice of Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig and other famous cartoon characters, was in serious condition after surgery for a broken leg. The helicopter had just taken off for Los Angeles when it was struck by the plane about 40 feet above the ground, according to witnesses. Two people aboard the plane were killed ...