Director Oliver Stone has garnered his share of Oscar nominations, and awards, for "Platoon" and "Born on the Fourth of July," and in a few weeks he'll stake his claim for next year's ceremony with "The Doors." Stone's look at '60s rock star Jim Morrison has been shown to selected members of the press in the past week or so, but with unusually tight security: For one thing, Stone's publicist has insisted that no writers who cover rock-and-roll be permitted to see the movie. A screening was held for Rolling Stone magazine, which is putting Morrison on the cover of an upcoming issue -- but while the magazine's movie staffers were invited, its music writers and editors were banned. At a Los Angeles screening held this week, writers were made to promise that their guests wouldn't be fellow journalists, others were quizzed about their relationships with personal friends they'd planned to bring, and some guests were vetoed. "Those kind of restrictions are almost unheard of," says another publicist, who adds that he's spoken to many staffers at Tri-Star Pictures who aren't happy with a policy that makes it appear as if "The Doors" has got something to hide, especially when it comes to re-creating the band's music. Naturally, a few music writers have managed to sneak into the film; their consensus seems to be that Val Kilmer is quite good as Morrison, and that the movie is half brilliant ("As serious a film as has ever been made about rock-and-roll, and one with a vivid sense of myth") and half ludicrous ("a lot of cliched, hoary, overfamiliar stuff about the tortured artist") ...

Another project shrouded in secrecy gets underway early next week, when Steven Spielberg begins shooting his "Peter Pan" update, "Hook." As is par for the course when it comes to Spielberg, sets will be closed and the script has been tightly guarded -- but still, a few details have managed to escape from the set of the film, which stars Robin Williams as an aging Peter Pan, Dustin Hoffman as Captain Hook and Julia Roberts as Tinkerbell. A crucial segment of the film, it seems, finds Peter desperately needed in Never-Never Land, where he hasn't been for decades, but at first he can't remember who he is, and later he finds himself unable to summon enough happy thoughts to get airborne. (This section, said one who's read the script, is "slow going.") Eventually, of course, Peter finds his way back and confronts his old nemesis -- but those scenes won't be shooting for some time, because Hoffman doesn't work for a couple of months.

Memo Mania A new internal memo addressing the health of the movie industry has leaked from the offices of Walt Disney Studios, from which last week leaked Chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg's widely circulated musings that were the talk of Hollywood. But the latest leak is a parody, obviously written by disgruntled Disney staffers, that only purports to be Katzenberg's master plan for these tough times. "We intend to save money by paying our employees even less," it reads. "Our underlying philosophy of cheapness lends itself especially well to lean times." The parody goes on to say that all employees must take an 88 percent pay cut, since the company's head, Michael Eisner, saw his compensation drop from 1989's $50 million-plus to last year's "paltry" $11 million. It also takes aim at the studio's tendency to hire actors who've been in slumps ("we should be ... at the back door of the Betty Ford Clinic with a pen and contract in hand") and its hands-on approach ("we offer all the creative freedom in the world, as long as you produce what we think the public will buy ... and it doesn't cost extra").