Tammy Haddad, who once executive-produced "Larry King Live," has been replaced as producer of "The Late Late Show With Tom Snyder," which she launched in January 1995 . . .

She is succeeded by Bruce McKay, who was producer of Snyder's "Tomorrow" show on NBC. McKay will oversee the production, planning and coordination of the CBS show, reporting to executive producer Peter Lassally . . .

"Tammy has been very valuable in developing and producing the show and we are very sorry to lose her," Lassally said in a statement yesterday. . . .

Haddad will remain for a transition period. She has retained a home in Washington during her stay in California. Her husband, Ted Greenberg, is the deputy independent counsel for the Mike Espy investigation here . . .

Haddad apparently wants to return to a job in news, especially in this election year, and sources say she's talked to all the networks in the couple of months since she first advised the Snyder people she was tired of the bicoastal commute . . .

Squire Rushnell, a former top ABC programming executive, has been named president and CEO of Nostalgia Television, effective immediately. He and retiring CEO Jack Helm will work together during the transition period. The network programs for adults 49 and over . . .

UPN, which is seen on Channel 20 here, is adding considerable comedy clout to the new fall schedule, announced yesterday . . .

Monday and Tuesday lineups will include five new sitcoms and a new drama hour called "The Burning Zone," while "Star Trek: Voyager" joins "The Sentinel" for an all-adventure Wednesday night . . .

Included in the revised lineup are new comedies with Sherman Hemsley, Malcolm-Jamal Warner and Robin Givens as well as "In the House," starring LL Cool J and Debbie Allen, which was canceled by NBC after one season. Its final play was Monday night, and for 20 appearances on the network it had averaged a 9.3/14 and was tied for 56th among 155 series seen on the networks this year . . .

Absent from next year's schedule will be "Nowhere Man," "Swift Justice," "Minor Adjustments" and "Paranormal Borderline" . . .

Here's the 1996-97 UPN schedule, with, as usual, new shows IN CAPS, and (N) indicating a new time slot . . .

Monday: "IN THE HOUSE" at 8; "MALCOLM & EDDIE," 8:30; "GOODE BEHAVIOR" at 9; and "SPARKS, SPARKS AND SPARKS," 9:30 . . .

Tuesday: Moesha at 8; "HOMEBOYS IN OUTER SPACE," 8:30; and "THE BURNING ZONE" at 9 . . .

Wednesday: "The Sentinel" at 8 and "Star Trek: Voyager" (N) . . .

As for the new shows:

"In the House" is the family sitcom about a former NFL superstar who rents his house to a once-wealthy socialite and her two children . . .

"Malcolm & Eddie" stars Malcolm-Jamal Warner as an aspiring play-by-play sports commentator whose tow-truck-driver roommate is "sometimes caught talking to his rundown rig." Their apartment in Kansas City is located over a bar, which will probably prove very convenient . . .

"Goode Behavior" stars Hemsley as a newly paroled con artist and Dorien Wilson as his son, who is hoping to be promoted to dean of humanities at a Chapel Hill university. Hemsley's daughter-in-law is a news anchor with a teenage daughter. Neither female role has been cast . . .

"Sparks, Sparks and Sparks" stars James Avery as the founder of a walk-in law firm in inner-city Los Angeles whose members also include his sons -- the ethical Terrence Howard and the shifty Miguel Nunez. Both are taken with Robin Givens, playing "a beautiful Stanford Law graduate" . . .

"Homeboys in Outer Space," set in the 23rd century, stars Flex and Mel Jackson as friends hopping "from one galaxy to another in their Space Hoopty, an intergalactic vehicle guided by a sassy onboard computer named Loquatia (Rhona Barrett)." John Webber plays Loquatia's mechanic; Kevin M. Richardson is Flex's "human-eating, cigar-loving humanoid" brother-in-law from the Vognarian planet . . .

"The Burning Zone" "depicts the struggle of science to keep up with perhaps the deadliest, most singleminded enemy known to man -- the virus." And stars Jeffrey Dan Morgan, Tamlyn Tomita and Denis Arndt as members of a scientific team "whose main goal is to overcome microscopic enemies before it's too late." Joining them in the fight, if it isn't already too late, is James Black as a CIA special agent . . .

Let's MakeOne last sally into the Sunday morning public affairs skirmish line, where this week's guests will mostly talk about Bob Dole's decision to leave the Senate . . .

On ABC's "This Week With David Brinkley," where the topic will be "Dole Reborn?," guests will include GOP Chairman Haley Barbour, Michigan Gov. John Engler (R) and California Gov. Pete Wilson (R). Plus Lewis Jordan, president of ValuJet Airlines . . .

CBS's "Face the Nation" will also discuss the Dole announcement, with Sens. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.) and John McCain (R-Ariz.), New Hampshire Gov. Steve Merrill and William Bennett . . .

NBC's "Meet the Press" features Senate Majority Whip Trent Lott (R-Miss.) and Minority Leader Thomas Daschle (D-S.D.). The Roundtable will include The Washington Post's David Maraniss, author of "Tell Newt to Shut Up," and Lisa Myers . . .

And "Fox News Sunday" features Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R-N.Y.), Dole policy adviser Vin Weber and House Majority Leader Richard Armey (R-Tex.). The newest kid on the block, which now doesn't expect to move into its permanent North Capitol Street digs until late summer, will broadcast from the Heurich mansion just off Dupont Circle on Sunday . . .

That's the good news. On Mother's Day, "Meet the Press" won the Sunday battle with an average of a 3.1 national rating and a 13 percent audience share (about 3.5 million viewers), compared with a 2.7/10 (3.3 million) for "This Week With David Brinkley," 1.5/6 (1.8 million) for "Face the Nation" and a 0.1/1 (190,000 viewers) for "Fox News Sunday." Each national ratings point represents 959,000 TV homes . . .

ABC research is quick -- some might say almost too quick -- to point out that Sunday's win was only the second for NBC's "Meet" since Jan. 1 and that, otherwise, "This Week" has won 13 of the past 14 weeks. Really, ABC! Isn't that kind of piling it on? . . .

Each of 11 top local anchorwomen is donating a suit from her personal wardrobe Monday evening to benefit D.C.-based Suited for Change, a nonprofit organization that provides professional attire and professional development seminars to low-income job seekers, free of charge. It has "suited" more than 800 women since it began in February 1994 . . .

The reception will be held at the Sheraton City Centre Hotel starting at 6:30 p.m. The hotel and Crestar Bank are hosts . . .

Suiting the occasion will be Channel 4's Doreen Gentzler and Wendy Rieger; Five's Tracey Neale and Cynthia Steele; Seven's Kathleen Matthews, Andrea McCarren, Christine McKendry, Mary Jo Walsh and reporter Gail Pennybacker; and Nine's Jan Fox, Andrea Roane and Kate Sullivan . . .

Funeral services for Robert A. Mead, an award-winning producer at both NBC and CBS News, will be tomorrow at 2 p.m. at the Money & King funeral home at 171 W. Maple Ave. in Vienna . . .

Mr. Mead died Tuesday at his home in Orange, Va., at the age of 61 . . .

He joined the CBS News bureau here in 1964 and served as Dan Rather's White House producer during the Nixon administration. He won an Emmy as producer of the CBS program "The Resignation of Spiro Agnew" in 1974 . . .

Mr. Mead left the network to serve as television adviser to President Ford and joined the NBC News bureau here in 1980. After six years in New York he returned to Washington as producer for NBC's weekend "Nightly News" . . .

He is survived by four children, a brother and former wife Sandra Mead Baughman . . .

Andy Rooney jetted back to New York yesterday with his cameraman/editor Bob Forte after an hour's interview in the morning with Jack Kevorkian. The controversial physician's attorney, Geoff Fieger, sat in . . .

"It was okay," said Rooney. "He didn't intrude too much." The commentator for CBS's "60 Minutes" said two chairs had been set up for the interview in the Detroit suburb of Southfield when the attorney dragged a third into view . . .

Kevorkian, who has aided the terminally ill in more than 20 suicides, earlier in the week had agreed to an interview with the newsmagazine, but only if Rooney conducted it . . .

Rooney was slightly puzzled by Kevorkian's insistence ("I was torn between flattered and nervous") but thinks "it was something I did that he liked" over the years . . .

The professionally grouchy commentator said Kevorkian proved "strangely fascinating" and "strangely likable. I kind of set out to see if he's a philosophical intellectual or a nut -- and he says he's both" . . .

"I can't imagine what it must be like, thinking about death all the time," mused Rooney . . .

He said "60 Minutes" executive producer Don Hewitt had called him Tuesday, saying, "It's the darnedest thing, we've been trying to get Kevorkian and he says he'll only talk to you" . . .

Rooney said the interview was relayed immediately to New York so it could be ready for Sunday's broadcast, which is already slated to include Mike Wallace's interview with William Pierce, author of "The Turner Diaries," the racist novel about the near future that is a favorite of right-wing militias and contains the recipe for the type of bomb used to blow up the Oklahoma City federal building . . .

"Don is quite high" on the Kevorkian interview, Rooney said, and the plan is for a regular 12-minute segment on the suicide doctor . . .

Rooney, a onetime newspaperman, has left the interviewing to others since the 1980s when he was a producer/host of many CBS News documentaries . . .

The Sunday deadline also earned Rooney and Forte a chartered jet flight back to New York yesterday, which doesn't happen very often at budget-conscious CBS News these days . . .