After the Beach Boys performed at the Live Aid fund-raising concert, more than 22,000 calls jammed phone lines in 20 minutes. It was indicative of the response to the rock event seen and heard around the world. By show's end it was announced that $40 million in pledges had been made. An excerpt from The Post of July 14, 1985:

By Richard Harrington

Washington Post Staff Writer

PHILADELPHIA, July 13 --

The most common greeting today was "Hello, World!" and it seemed the whole world was watching on television as Live Aid benefit concerts here and in London raised tens of millions of dollars for hunger relief in Africa.

The concert ended here tonight 14 hours after it began with the same song it opened with, the USA for Africa anthem "We Are the World." Sung a cappella by Joan Baez in the morning, the song reappeared as a chorale under the guidance of its author, Lionel Richie, joined by Harry Belafonte, Chrissie Hynde, Baez, Sheena Easton, Dionne Warwick, Melissa Manchester, Kenny Loggins, Patti La Belle, Daryl Hall, a 50-member children's choir and most of the 36 acts that had performed during the day. . . .

In a triumph of technology and good will, the greatest entertainment package in rock history, ranging from such legendary figures as Bob Dylan, Mick Jagger, the Who, David Bowie, Tina Turner, Duran Duran and Paul McCartney to relative unknowns like the Hooters, came off on schedule and with neither technical snafus nor displays of ego from any of the participants. . . .

The 100,000 sunburned but festive rock fans at JFK Stadium and 72,000 others at London's Wembley Stadium were but a tiny part of a worldwide television audience of as many as 2 billion. . . .

"It's not just the greatest show on Earth," said concert organizer and Boomtown Rats lead singer Bob Geldof, "it's the greatest gig in the galaxy." . . .

Music was the subtext of the long day, but conscience was the motif of this rock/television extravaganza that was put together in 10 weeks and beamed live via 12 satellites to at least 90 countries and on a tape-delay basis to 50 more including the Soviet Union and China. . . .

Most of the electronic hopscotching was between London and Philadelphia. Prince Charles and Princess Diana, seated in the royal box with David Bowie and Elton John, opened the Wembley concert (at 7 a.m. EST) waving to the crowd as "God Save the Queen" was played; they were followed quickly by Status Quo performing "Rocking All Over the World."

Two hours later, actor Jack Nicholson introduced Baez to the Philadelphia crowd. "Good morning, children of the '80s," she shouted in greeting. Her presence was an obvious bridge between '60s political consciousness and commitment and the new wave of the '80s. . . .

"You are the world, you are the children," Baez reminded everyone, and everyone seemed to agree.

This series is available at www.washingtonpost.com