A portion of the proceeds from the Woodstock '99 double CD and home videos will benefit a national rape hot line. The three-day music festival, which was the scene of looting and rioting on its final night, was also marred by reports of sexual assaults. A spokesman for Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) said the money also will be used to expand the group's outreach and educational programs.

"We felt we had to do something to make sure this never happens again," said co-promoter John Scher.

Scher explained that he chose RAINN in part because the organization was supportive in the weeks following the festival. "The RAINN people were very good with us," he said. "They helped us come to terms with what happened."

Scher said that Woodstock, which drew an estimated 225,000 concertgoers, has yet to turn a profit, but he wanted to make a difference. "Hopefully, this will help somebody," he said. "It's the right thing to do" . . .

Duran Duran has won a libel suit against the Sun, the British newspaper, over an article that claimed the band was paying people to pose as fans. MTV News reports that a London High Court ruled that the July 1998 article, which suggested that the band "had reached an all-time low" by paying passersby to act as Duran Duran fans for a U.K. TV film, was indeed damaging to the band . . .

The Who is in the early stages of making its first studio album since 1982, says vocalist Roger Daltrey, 55 . . .

Shut out of tonight's sold-out "Buena Vista Social Club" concert with Ibrahim Ferrer and Ruben Gonzalez? Tickets go on sale tomorrow for their return, Feb. 7 at Constitution Hall.