A majority of British music fans believe that rock stars encourage young people to take drugs. A survey in the pop newspaper Melody Maker showed 65 percent believing that rock singers helped to incite drug use. An overwhelming majority--95 percent--believed that all or most rock stars take drugs regularly or have in the past. "The results of this survey show that the worlds of drugs and music will always be linked and consequently rock fans no longer consider drugs to be a big deal," Melody Maker suggested . . .

Gary Glitter, the '70s British rock star jailed this month for possessing child pornography, faces the threat of attacks from fellow inmates, a London newspaper reported yesterday. The Daily Star said security had been tightened around Glitter, who is in solitary confinement in a Bristol prison for his own protection after another inmate called for fellow convicts to "mete out a little jail justice." The flamboyant 55-year-old singer, who was tried under his real name, Paul Gadd, was handed a four-month term for the possession of a vast library of child pornography stored on his home computer. Prison officials had wanted to transfer Glitter to a minimum-security facility but abandoned the plan after learning that cameras had been smuggled in to take pictures of the jailed star. "So many people want to get to Glitter," one prison insider told the Star. "Some want to attack him because of his crimes, others want to take a picture of him without his famous wig. Then there's a few who want his autograph" . . .

Tex-Mex musician Doug Sahm's death last week was caused by heart disease, the New Mexico medical investigator's office has ruled. Sahm, who was a key player in the Sir Douglas Quintet in the 1960s and the Texas Tornados in the 1990s, was found dead in a hotel room in the mountain resort town of Taos last week. He was 58 . . .