Both sides vulnerable

NORTH

{spade} A K 10

{heart} Q J

{diam} A 6 3 2

{club} J 9 6 2

WEST

{spade} 8 7 4 3

{heart} 5 4

{diam} 10 9 8 7

{club} 10 8 4

EAST

{spade} 9 6 2

{heart} 9 8 7 6 3 2

{diam} K 4

{club} K 3

SOUTH (D)

{spade} Q J 5

{heart} A K 10

{diam} Q J 5

{club} A Q 7 5

The bidding: South West North East1 {club} Pass 1 {diam} Pass 2 NTPass 6 NT All Pass Opening lead: {diam} 10

Today's West was Wendy, my club's feminist member, who thinks women are to men as lace needlepoint is to canvas. To be sure, Wendy made it a point to needle South after he went down at 6NT.

South played low from dummy on the first diamond, and East took the king and returned a diamond. South won with the jack and counted three diamond tricks, three spades and three hearts. To make the slam, he had to take three club tricks without losing one.

South therefore led a spade to dummy and returned a low club to his queen, and Wendy followed with the eight. South fell for it. He went back to dummy and led the jack of clubs, hoping to pin the 10 in Wendy's hand. East's king covered, but when Wendy produced the four, South had to lose the setting trick to her ten of clubs.

"Didn't think a woman could produce a textbook falsecard?" Wendy cackled.

South avoids the trap and saves 1,540 points if he counts the distribution of the concealed hands before he takes a view in clubs. After South's queen of clubs wins, he should cash the queen of diamonds, three hearts, two more spades and the ace of diamonds, leaving him with the J-9 of clubs in dummy and the A-7 in his hand. South will find out that East started with six hearts (West will discard on the third heart), two diamonds and at least three spades.

Since East had only 13 cards, he can have only two clubs. So South leads dummy's low club at the 12th trick and claims when East's king appears.

(c)2004, Tribune Media Services