Dining Capsules

Restaurants previously reviewed by Eve Zibart:

HARD TIMES CAFE (1404 King St., Alexandria; 703-837-0050. Metro: King Street. Thirteen other area locations) -- This 25-year-old family-friendly local chain still serves up bargain bowls of chili -- Texas-style coarse ground, the family recipe; slightly sweet, cinnamony Cincinnati style; mushroomy veggie; and somewhat spicier, competition-style Terlingua Red -- and all the fixin's, from neutral spaghetti and cheese to potent jalapenos and chili vinegar, but nowadays it also serves up good grilled chicken, salmon and even some of those smaller, old-fashioned steaks you don't need to refinance for (not at all locations). Chili from $5.79, entrees $8.99-$10.99 (prices may vary slightly).

PASHA CAFE (3911 N. Lee Hwy., Arlington; 703-528-1111) -- This low-key, cheery and increasingly sure-footed neighborhood restaurant follows the spirit, if not the letter, of the nearby original cafe (now Portabellos, which shares ownership with Pasha). Easy-tempered, and with food just as easy to get along with, Pasha offers Middle Eastern and Mediterranean fare that ranges from the familiar dips and purees (notably a pungent-sweet blend of roasted peppers, walnuts and pomegranate called maramar, the all-in-one hummous shawarma with lamb and chopped tomatoes and the summer cooler zucchini pureed called kosa bel zabadi) to parsley-peppery tabbouleh, lightly spiced shrimp with dry-sauteed okra, fine artichoke ravioli in sun-dried tomato sauce and citrus-marinated salmon. Don't look for spice here, indulge in texture. Entrees $7.50-$19.95.

DIVINO (7345-B Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda; 240-497-0300. Metro: Bethesda) -- Be cool, at least in the beginning: The kitchen of this Argentine steakhouse and tapas lounge takes a little while to get warmed up, and there are plenty of cold tapas to choose from early in the cocktail hour (and often a little complementary tasting); but once the grill gets agoing, the going gets hot. Don't miss the custard-soft grilled sweetbreads, the skirt steak, mushroom mousse with white asparagus sauce, stuffed eggplant, marinated semi-boneless quail, lamb or venison and, surprisingly, fish of the day. Paellas come mostly for two, but there are some tapa-size versions, or try the lobster cazuela. Tapas $5-$8; entrees $14-$32.

SOBE SEAFOOD CO. (3100 Clarendon Blvd., Arlington; 703-528-0033. Metro: Clarendon) -- This South Beach-style (hence the name) may be a little more style-conscious than substantive, and the staff can get a little wired; but the kitchen is getting its rhythm down, and already pays unusual attention to presentation details. But pace yourself; most dishes are generous, especially the appetizers. Try the jerk shrimp, spinach-artichoke dip, crab-crusted salmon, not-too-marinated tuna or fried calamari. The Caesar salad dressing may not be egg-sactly authentic, but it's pretty good. Entrees $10-$20.

NAGE (19730 Coastal Hwy./Route 1, Rehoboth Beach, Del.; 302-226-2037) -- Think modern eclectic fare is getting cutesy? Sure it has; but try Kevin Reading's lemon-salt-seared scallops with "mustard seed toffee" or the pan-roasted grouper in "warm lobster gazpacho" and see what just one degree of irreverence can produce. The seafood nage is a little clumsy, but it's probably worth the occasional splash of lobster-tomato-fennel broth; and the tender, meaty frog's legs could start a revolution even here in chicken country. And the clams casino flatbread and white truffle french fries are a serious threat to resolutions. The salt levels can be a little high (must be that ocean breeze); ask for a light touch. Entrees $16-$28.

TAJITU (9 E. Patrick St., Frederick; 301-631-6800) -- This pretty, novice-friendly and unusually good Ethiopian restaurant gives "home cooking" a good name. Decorated in part to resemble an open-air patio, and with unobtrusively pleasant music, Tajitu feels like a friend's house, and the airy house-made injera and complex ground spices suggest a host's special attention. Among the best dishes are yabeg wot alicha, gingery sauteed lamb; rich, dark doro wot, with its traditional drumstick and boiled egg in reduced onions; kinche, a sort of tabbouleh salad; and the lentil and yellow pea stews. The layered, chili-hot (but not bitter) berbere sauce is an essential condiment. Leave time for coffee -- green beans skillet-roasted and ground to order, and steeped like incense. Entrees $8.50-$19.50.

CHLOE (2473 18th St. NW upstairs; 202-265-6592. Metro: Woodley Park-Zoo/Adams-Morgan) -- Chloe's food is good enough, and so moderately priced, that you'll probably go back, especially while the roof terrace is open. But the earlier the better; the noise level jumps quickly, and the trend radar goes up as soon as the sun goes down. (Of course, there's nothing wrong with licking your fingers in the VIP lounge, if you can make it look good.) Try the first-rate steak salad, the indulgent lump crab cocktail, duck bruschetta, barbecue ribs, teriyaki salmon or homey roasted chicken. Entrees $10-$19. Not wheelchair accessible.

LE VIEUX LOGIS (7925 Old Georgetown Rd., Bethesda; 301-652-6816. Metro: Bethesda) -- In a trend-driven town, consistency and resilience are rare virtues. For 25 years, this cheerily cluttered mini-inn has been serving up classics and old-fashioned continentalism with as much affection for tradition as for its customers. Regulars know to go for the delicate scallops -- and you'll never find escargots more garlicky than these. Entrees $24-$33. Wheelchair access limited.

RESTAURANT KOLUMBIA (1801 K St. NW; 202-331-5551. Metro: Farragut North or Farragut West) -- Jamie Stachowski's cooking isn't fusion, it's fascination: He's interested in so many styles and schools that he can't help making a little this and a little that. Sometimes it's fabulous: a torchon of foie gras just brushed with sea salt and aspic; a tart of fresh anchovies and oven-dried tomatoes; braised veal cheeks so tender they seem held together by memory alone; grilled squid with kalamata olives, mint, fried lemons and arugula; and lightly floured sauteed sweetbreads over baby spinach with pine nuts, capers and grapes. And even when the recipes are a little strange (lobster-she crab bisque slick with okra), they're always entertaining. Entrees $24-$35.

BISTRO 123 (Tysons Corner Center lower level, Route 123, Tysons Corner; 703-288-1369) -- It looks a little like a shopping mall cafe, with its bright shiny wood and repro-art decor, but someone's in the kitchen for the diner. And if bistro classics make you sing, head for the leg of lamb steak, the beets and goat cheese salad, pan-seared snapper and frog's legs, if only for the ethereal onion ravioli. Entrees $12.95-$29.95.

Shrimp with clams and mussels, potatoes and corn on the cob at Chloe in Adams Morgan.