Compagnia Aterballetto deserves its reputation as Italy's foremost contemporary dance company. Artistic director Mauro Bigonzetti uses his amazing dancers to project a fecund and kinky imagination. Saturday at the George Mason University Center for the Arts, Aterballeto "projected" Bigonzetti's versions of two Stravinsky-Diaghilev collaborations for the Ballet Russe, "Les Noces" (choreographed by Bronislava Nijinska in 1923) and "Petrouchka" (Michel Fokine, 1911).

Kinky as he gets, Bigonzetti never abandons his classical roots (he trained at the Teatro dell'Opera's School in Rome), much as Stravinsky never totally chucks tonality in either of these scores. When a pirouette crumples or a barrel turn descends into a somersault, it crackles with energy by virtue of contrast. It's like Stravinsky layering minor chords on top of major ones.

The "Les Noces" ("The Wedding") set is stark black offset by splashes of red. The monochromatic color scheme alludes to Nijinska's original austere production, as does the division of the stage between men and women. There the connection ends. Bigonzetti's vision is one of shifting designs. Set, lighting and dancers contribute equally. Bare arms on a black background appear as shafts of light. Shafts of light move quickly, like dancers. Arms become angles. Limbs form lines.

The work explores the underbelly of tying the knot. Where yesterday's daughters wept at leaving parents, today's brides dread high divorce rates. Bigonzetti's groom raises his bride, then drops her like a stone.

Bigonzetti begins both works in silence. A dancer provides the silent upbeat to the first nerve-jangling chord that opens each work. An arm swings out in "Les Noces," the Moor pirouettes in "Petrouchka" -- and then bam! On the downbeat, the dancer nails a pose as that high, shrill chord pierces the air.

Bigonzetti's "Petrouchka" takes place in a department store. The Ballerina wears a see-through blouse with nipples showing and disco boots. The Moor steals clothes off the racks and gets killed off instead of Petrouchka, who executes a victorious entrechat six with flexed feet. Valerio Longo, fabulous as the Moor, gives Petrouchka the finger. Bigonzetti gives us a rollicking good time.

Monochromatic colors and shafts of light are used in Compagnia Alterballetto's "Les Noces.""Les Noces" explores the sometimes rocky relationship between the bride and groom.