In last Sunday's "Table for Eight" column, the recipe for paella omitted two steps. When the rice is first added to the paella pan, it should be boiled rapidly for 10 minutes. Then the uncooked shrimp with the marinade should be added. PAELLA (8 servings) 1/2 pound fresh chorizos or Italian hot sausages 1 pound raw medium shrimp 1 tablespoon lemon juice 7 tablespoons olive oil 10-ounce package frozen tiny peas 18 small mussels 18 small cherrystone clams 1/2 pound lean bacon 8 chicken thighs 1 large onion, sliced vertically 1 green pepper, sliced vertically 4 cloves garlic, minced 3 cups chicken broth 1 cup beef bouillon 1 cup dry white wine 1 teaspoon dried saffron flowers (2 .2-gram vials) 1 bay leaf, crumbled 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon dried oregano Salt and pepper to taste 2 1/2 cups converted or short-grain rice 1 can artichoke hearts, drained, refreshed under cold water and halved 1/2 cup drained, seeded and chopped canned imported plum tomatoes 1 roasted red pepper, seeded, or a 4- or 5-ounce jar pimientos, cut into strips 2 lemons, quartered 5 tablespoons minced parsley Simmer the chorizos or Italian sausages in water for 10 minutes, drain and slice. Set aside. Peel and devein the shrimp, place them in a bowl and stir in the lemon juice and 3 tablespoons of the olive oil. Cover and refrigerate. Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil, drop in the peas and cook for 3 minutes. Turn the peas into a colander, refresh under cold water and refrigerate. Scrub and debeard the mussels and scrub the clams. Place the shellfish in a colander and set the colander in a large dishpan of cold water. After 10 minutes, change the water, repeating six times to rid the shellfish of sand. Drain the shellfish and refrigerate. Cut the bacon into a small dice and place in a large frying pan. Add the remaining 4 tablespoons of olive oil and saute' the bacon for 5 minutes. Add the reserved sliced chorizos or Italian sausages and saute' for another 5 minutes. Remove the

THIS MEAL consists of a series of "one-pots." It begins with a potpourri of raw vegetables served with drinks rather than at the table. The vegetables are dipped into a bagna cauda, a warm, deep-brown Mediterranean bath of olive oil, butter, garlic and anchovies. Then guests sit down to that most refined of casseroles, a steaming paella redolent with saffron, studded with shellfish, harboring wonderful bits and pieces of shrimp, Spanish chorizos and chicken thighs within the rice, and garnished with lemon wedges and parsley. Finally, there is a tray of exotic fruits to clear the palate and the senses. The fruits are accompanied by madeleines, light and lovely little French cakes flavored, preferably, with raspberries in the form of an eau de vie, framboise.

The bagna cauda, a dish from the Italian Piedmont that deserves to be better known, is best kept warm over a candle, although it is eminently edible even at room temperature. The trick is to get your guests to swish the vegetables around and stir up the garlic and melted anchovies that sink to the bottom of the bowl. I make bagna cauda half an hour before guests arrive and leave it over the smallest flame possible, with a flame tamer in between the pot and the heat. A nice, easy way to mince the large amount of garlic needed for this recipe is to start the food processor motor going and drop the garlic buds through the tube one at a time. As the garlic is minced, it is thrown to the sides of the bowl; thus the mush that usually results when the motor is pulsed is avoided. Most of the vegetables can be prepared a day in advance, although cucumbers are best peeled and seeded as close to eating time as possible since they seem to acquire a sliminess rather quickly. I can't think of a vegetable or green that isn't good with bagna cauda, so choices should be made by what looks fresh and good and by reasonableness of price.

Part of the paella can be cooked in advance, and all the ingredients can be prepared well in advance. However, the final cooking does require some last-minute attention, which the cook can give without guilt, knowing her guests are occupied in the living room with dipping their vegetables. The paella recipe may seem intimidating because of its length and the number of ingredients, but it should be a comfort to realize that once put together, nothing else is to be done.

I use a 15-inch-diameter aluminum paella pan made by Leyse and available in most kitchenware shops. It has the needed six-quart capacity and can also be used for a saute' pan. However, a wok or a large saute' pan will work, as will a six-quart casserole, especially if it is wide and shallow. It is important that the rice, once it is added, is never stirred, since it will become soggy and unpleasant. The ingredients are pushed into the rice with a spoon. I have excellent results with converted rice.

The one thing that mustn't be stinted in a paella is saffron. It is useless to think that paprika can be substituted for even some of the saffron, for only saffron gives the distinctive flavor that is wanted. Saffron flowers are far preferable to powdered saffron, and once you accept the fact that you will need to spend almost $3 for this wonderful flavoring agent, the results absolutely justify the investment. Stores that stock saffron keep it behind locked doors. I bought excellent Spanish saffron flowers at Magruder's recently.

Many paella recipes call for precooking the shrimp, but I find that sinking the marinated raw shrimp into the rice avoids the rubberiness that shrimp take on when they are overcooked. It is very easy to peel and devein raw shrimp if you cut through the back of the shell with a good pair of kitchen scissors. The shell comes off and the black line is exposed with one motion. The line is then easily rinsed out. Chorizos are preferable to Italian sausages, not only because they are Spanish and thus authentic, but also because they add a nice color and flavor to the paella. Chorizos can be found at Latin and Spanish stores and almost always at Magruder's. Some recipes for paella list mussels and clams as optional ingredients, but to me they are essential. Mussels and clams are usually available in decent fish markets and are quite simple to cope with, especially if the mussels have been grown on strings, which keeps them mud- and barnacle-free. They cost a bit more but the difference is well worth the trouble saved. The easiest way to trim the beard (and mussels must be trimmed of their beards) is to hold the mussel with one hand, then grab the beard with a paring knife with the other hand, and pull down hard. If you can't find clams, double the numbers of mussels.

In choosing fruits, use your nose as well as your thumb, because a ripe fruit without perfume is not worth much. Madeleine molds are available in almost all cookware stores, and while buying two may seem like an indulgence, they pack compactly and are comparatively inexpensive. It is very nice to be able to bake the entire two dozen at one time, and this recipe is so sure-fire that I think the molds will get a lot of use.

BAGNA CAUDA WITH CRUDITES (8 servings) 1/4 pound unsalted butter 3/4 cup green olive oil 4 teaspoons finely minced garlic 1 can flat anchovy fillets, drained and chopped Raw vegetables: Very thin, tight-headed asparagus, the stalks peeled with a vegetable peeler Cucumbers, peeled, seeded and cut into sticks Zucchini, soaked, then scrubbed but unpeeled, and cut into sticks Whole red radishes or white radishes cut into sticks Tiny carrots, peeled, trimmed and cut into sticks Cauliflower, separated into florets Whole green beans, trimmed and strings removed with a vegetable peeler Scallions, trimmed, with a few inches of green remaining Cut the butter into 1/4-inch pieces and combine with the olive oil in a small heavy saucepan. Place over low heat and stir until the butter is melted but not foaming. Add the garlic and stir for a few seconds. Then add the anchovies and cook over lowest heat possible, stirring until the anchovies have dissolved. This will take from 10 to 15 minutes. Turn into a bowl and set over a warming candle if you have one. Serve with a variety of the above raw vegetables, arranged on a platter or a flat basket.

PAELLA (8 servings) 1/2 pound fresh chorizos or Italian hot sausages 1 pound raw medium shrimp 1 tablespoon lemon juice 7 tablespoons olive oil 1 package frozen tiny peas 18 small mussels 18 small cherrystone clams 1/2 pound lean bacon 8 chicken thighs 1 large onion, sliced vertically 1 green pepper, sliced vertically 4 cloves garlic, minced 3 cups chicken broth 1 cup beef bouillon 1 cup dry white wine 1 teaspoon dried saffron flowers (2 .2-gram vials) 1 bay leaf, crumbled 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon dried oregano Salt and pepper to taste 2 1/2 cups converted or short-grain rice 1 can artichoke hearts, drained, refreshed under cold water and halved 1/2 cup drained, seeded and chopped canned imported plum tomatoes 1 roasted red pepper, seeded, or a 4- or 5-ounce jar pimientos, cut into strips 2 lemons, quartered 5 tablespoons minced parsley Simmer the chorizos or Italian sausages in water for 10 minutes, drain and slice. Set aside.

Peel and devein the shrimp, place them in a bowl and stir in the lemon juice and 3 tablespoons of the olive oil. Cover and refrigerate.

Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil, drop in the peas and cook for 3 minutes. Turn the peas into a colander, refresh under cold water and refrigerate.

Scrub and debeard the mussels and scrub the clams. Place the shellfish in a colander and set the colander in a large dishpan of cold water. After 10 minutes, change the water, repeating six times to rid the shellfish of sand. Drain the shellfish and refrigerate.

Cut the bacon into a small dice and place in a large frying pan. Add the remaining 4 tablespoons of olive oil and saute' the bacon for 5 minutes. Add the reserved sliced chorizos or Italian sausages and saute' for another 5 minutes. Remove the bacon and sausage with a slotted spoon to a paella pan, wok or casserole with a six-quart capacity.

Dry the chicken thighs and brown them over high heat on all sides in the oil remaining in the frying pan. Remove the browned chicken to the paella pan.

Add the onions, green peppers and the garlic to the frying pan and cook, covered, over low heat until the onions are soft, about 10 minutes. Remove the vegetables to the paella pan, using a slotted spoon, and discard the fat remaining in the frying pan. (The dish may be done in advance to this point and cooled and refrigerated in the paella pan.)

Add the chicken broth, beef bouillon, wine, herbs and flavorings to the paella pan with the chicken, vegetables and sausage. Bring to simmer, cover and cook over low heat for 10 minutes. Remove the lid, bring the liquid to a rapid boil and add the rice, pushing it down with a spoon. Do not stir. Then bury the reserved peas in the rice along with the halved artichoke hearts, the tomatoes and the roasted red pepper or pimiento strips, pushing them down with a spoon. Again, do not stir. Finally, insert the shellfish into the rice, hinged side down. Reduce heat, cover the pan and cook for another 5 minutes. Remove the lid and cook for another few minutes, or until all the liquid has been absorbed by the rice and the clams and mussels have opened.

Garnish with lemon wedges, sprinkle parsley over all and serve immediately.

EXOTIC FRUIT TRAY (8 servings) 3 kiwis, peeled and sliced into thin rounds 1 pineapple, peeled, cored and cut into strips 1 cantaloupe, peeled, seeded and sliced into wedges 1/4 watermelon, rind removed, seeded and cut into chunks 1 papaya, peeled, seeded and cut into wedges 1 pint strawberries, washed and drained but not stemmed 2 limes, quartered

Arrange the fruits in a pretty pattern on a platter or tray, garnish with lime wedges and serve with madeleines.

MADELEINES (Makes 2 dozen) 2 tablespoons butter, melted Flour to coat the molds 1 1/3 cups flour 3/4 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 pound (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature 1/2 cup sugar 2 whole eggs 2 egg yolks 2 tablespoons framboise or other eau de vie or cognac 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract Confectioners' sugar

Brush two madeleine molds, each making 12 madeleines, with the melted butter. If you have only one mold, use half the butter and reserve the rest for a second baking. Sprinkle some flour into each indentation, shake the pan to distribute the flour, turn upside down and tap out excess flour.

Sift the flour and baking powder together and set aside. Cream the butter and sugar with an electric hand mixer until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, and then the egg yolks, beating thoroughly after each addition. Beat in the flour and baking powder mixture and then the eau de vie or cognac and the vanilla. Divide the batter among 24 indentations (or half the batter among 12 indentations) and bake at 425 degrees for 10 to 12 minutes, or until the tops are lightly browned. Turn the madeleines onto a cake rack, set them right side up and cool. If a second batch is needed, wash the pan, prepare it with batter and repeat. Just before serving, sprinkle them with confectioners' sugar.