In last Sunday's recipe for Bourbon Pound Cake, the baking time should be 1 1/4 hours, not 30 to 35 minutes. BOURBON POUND CAKE (Makes a 10-inch cake) 1 1/2 cups unsalted butter 2 1/3 cups sugar 8 extra-large eggs 3 3/4 cups flour 4 teaspoons double-action baking powder 1/2 cup milk 2/3 cup bourbon (or other liquor such as scotch, dark rum or cognac) 2 teaspoons vanilla Cream the butter in a large bowl until pale in color, very light and fluffy in texture. Add the sugar, a little at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating for about 20 or 30 seconds after each egg is added. All this beating causes the final texture of the cake to be light and silken. Place the flour in a bowl and stir the baking powder into it. Set aside. Measure the milk, bourbon and vanilla and combine. The milk will curdle when the bourbon is added to it. Add the dry ingredients and the liquid ingredients alternately to the creamed butter (about a third at a time), beating only until just combined. Once flour is added to a cake batter, overbeating can cause the final texture to be coarse and grainy. When all the ingredients have been combined and the batter beaten until there are no lumps, pour into a large buttered and floured bundt pan. Bake in a 325-degree oven until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, about 1 1/4 hours. Allow cake to cool in the pan for about 5 minutes, then turn out onto rack to complete cooling.

Bourbon, the most noble of the whiskeys produced in this country, is more American than apple pie or southern fried chicken. As the label on one brand says, bourbon was "Born with the Republic."

Suffering a shortage of federal funds, in 1791 George Washington imposed an excise tax on whiskey. Feelings against the tax were so strong, particularly among Pennsylvania distillers, that tax collectors were tarred and feathered and troops were needed to quell the rioting. To avoid tax collectors, many distillers moved into Bourbon County, Kentucky (from whence the whiskey would later take its name), and continued production clandestinely. In the 18th century, the whiskey was produced from rye. Later, due to a failure in the rye crop, these distillers discovered that a great whiskey could be produced using corn as the primary grain base. Today, federal law requires any whiskey called "bourbon"' to be made from at least 51 percent corn.

In addition to the famous bourbons produced in Kentucky, excellent bourbons are being made in parts of Pennsylvania, Tennessee, as well as Virginia and Maryland.

Walking into a neighborhood liquor store, one may find as many as 15 brands of bourbon. Each has a unique flavor particular to its producer. Generally the older bourbons, those with the longest aging process and often the highest price, have the biggest richest flavor. On the other hand, inexpensive bourbons are likely to be coarse, harsh and unbalanced, and in cooking can easily detract from the final flavor of a recipe. Cook with a good-quality bourbon, one that tastes good to you. The alcohol content is of no relevance in any of the recipes below, as it volatilizes in the cooking process.

In a gastronomically frivolous mood one night, we served four bourbon dishes to some close friends for dinner. A small cup of chowder was first, then pieces of chicken that had been marinated overnight in bourbon and onion barbecue sauce and grilled over charcoal, and for dessert a bourbon-flavored pound cake accompanied by Bob's Bourbon Coffee. More American, even, than apple pie.

BOURBON CORN CHOWDER (Makes 4 quarts)

This is adapted from Barbara Kafka's corn chowder recipe from her new book, "American Food and California Wine." 1/2 cup butter 4 medium onions, peeled and coarsely chopped 4 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped 3 17-ounce cans cream-style corn 2 1/2 cups drained corn niblets 1 quart chicken stock 2 1/2 cups heavy or whipping cream 3/4 cup bourbon

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Melt the butter in the bottom of a large soup pot and add the onions and garlic. Saute' until tender and translucent. Add the two kinds of corn, the stock and cream and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally.

While the soup is heating, warm the bourbon in a small saucepan. Tipping saucepan away from your face, carefully ignite the bourbon with a lighted match. When the flame dies out, stir into the soup, taste, and season with salt and pepper. Simmer for 15 minutes before serving.

The butter will separate if this soup is stored in the refrigerator or freezer. Reheating will return the soup to normal.

BOURBON AND ONION BARBECUE SAUCE (Makes about 1 quart)

This sauce is as good with cold food as with hot. Moisten cold cooked fish or chicken with the barbecue sauce for cold sandwiches or reheating, or use as directed in your favorite recipes. 1/2 cup oil 2 medium onions, peeled and finely chopped 4 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped 3/4 cup tomato pure'e 3/4 cup bourbon 1/2 cup worcestershire sauce 1/4 cup soy sauce 1/4 cup brown sugar Juice of 2 lemons 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon paprika 1/2 to 1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

Pour the oil into a large saucepan and set over medium-high heat. Brown onions and garlic in the oil, add the remaining ingredients, stir and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 15 minutes.

BOURBON POUND CAKE (Makes a 10-inch cake)

Years of experimenting with this recipe have led me to believe it is best with bourbon or scotch; however, I have made it with dark rum or cognac. 1 1/2 cups unsalted butter 2 1/3 cups sugar 8 extra-large eggs 3 3/4 cups flour 4 teaspoons double-action baking powder 1/2 cup milk 2/3 cup bourbon (or other liquor) 2 teaspoons vanilla

Cream the butter in a large bowl until pale in color, very light and fluffy in texture. Add the sugar, a little at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating for about 20 or 30 seconds after each egg is added. All this beating causes the final texture of the cake to be light and silken.

Place the flour in a bowl and stir the baking powder into it. Set aside. Measure the milk, bourbon and vanilla, and combine. The milk will curdle when the bourbon is added to it.

Add the dry ingredients and the liquid ingredients alternately to the creamed butter (about a third at a time), beating only until just combined. Once flour is added to a cake batter, overbeating can cause the final texture to be coarse and grainy. When all the ingredients have been combined and the batter beaten until there are no lumps, pour into a large buttered and floured bundt pan or a buttered and floured 10-inch tube pan.

Bake in a 325-degree oven until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, about 30 to 35 minutes.

Allow cake to cool in the pan for about 5 minutes, then turn out onto rack to complete cooling.

BOB'S BOURBON COFFEE (Makes 1 drink) 1 ounce bourbon 1/2 ounce coffee liqueur Hot coffee Freshly whipped cream Bittersweet chocolate

Measure the bourbon and coffee liqueur into a mug or tempered glass. Fill almost to the top with hot coffee. Stir together. Spoon a generous dollop of whipped cream onto the drink, then grate some chocolate on top of the cream. Serve immediately.