Due to a production error, some copies of today's Food Section, printed in advance, were printed incorrectly. In those copies, the local roti round-up is on the front page and is repeated inside. Also in those copies, errors occurred in the front-page stories about lasagna, roti in Trinidad and wine. * Text is missing from the front-page portion of the story on Trinidad's roti. It should read: Simply unfold the top section of waxed paper so a bit of roti peeks out, munch and unfold again, pushing the roti higher and higher up in the bag as you go. If you've ordered a chicken roti, you'll have the additional challenge of contending with the bones. But that's just considered a part of the experience and a part of the bargain--and at about $1.75 apiece, roti is a delicious and memorable bargain. Here are some roti recipes for those who remember how good they tasted in Port of Spain and for those who are curious to try roti for the first time.Those recipes are on page E5 of today's Food Section.

When you want a quick lunch to go, here, you order a roti, the wholesome stuffed pancake that is Trinidad's answer to the Big Mac. Roti stands and shops are as much a part of the urban foodscape here as the Golden Arches are in New York or the District.

Wherever you happen to be, roti will not be far. A roti stand welcomes you to Trinidad as you turn out of the airport parking lot, and in downtown Port of Spain, the pungent curry scent of this island specialty pervades the air as densely as the music of Trinidad's renowned steel bands.

Don't ever try to tell a Trinidadian that you've tasted roti on Grenada or any of the other Caribbean islands--he'll laugh in your face. "Roti was invented in Trinidad," he'll insist.

Actually, he may well be right. Roti is the generic Indian word for bread, and the flat Indian-style bread now used for making the island's specialty was brought to Trinidad by the thousands of East Indians arriving to work on sugar plantations after slavery was abolished on the island in 1834.

The tradition of accompanying their meals with bread was well established for these immigrants, who presumably discovered that wrapping their curries in roti was a handy way to bring lunch to the fields.

Today most roti stands and shops have at least five types of curry available, including shrimp, chicken, beef, goat and pumpkin. In addition to typical curry-blend spices, fillings are usually spiked with a few drops of Angostura bitters, a secret potion created and manufactured on Trinidad.

You're free to mix and match fillings, and if you want to do it like the islanders, ask for a dollop of amchar before the bread is folded envelope-fashion around the stuffing. This sour tamarind paste is a great distraction from the slightly incendiary powers of the curry.

Eating roti in high Trinidadian style is a challenge to the uninitiated. First of all, you must be walking. Secondly, you must not remove the stuffed pancake either from the waxed paper wrapped tightly around it or from the brown paper bag. Simply unfold the top section of waxed paper so a bit of roti peeks out, munch, and unfold again, pushing who are curious to try roti for the first time.

In Trinidad, instead of butter, a thin layer of dal (lentil or pea puree) is often folded into the bread before it is fried. ROTI PANCAKES (Makes 6 pancakes) 2 3/4 cups unbleached white flour 1 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 5 tablespoons chilled butter, cut into bits Approximately 1/4 cup melted clarified butter (or 2 tablespoons each of butter and oil)

Sift 2 1/2 cups of the flour, salt and baking powder together. Cut in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add about 10 tablespoons of cold water, or just enough to create a kneadable, not sticky dough.

On a floured board, knead the dough for 5 minutes. Place it in a bowl for 30 minutes, covered, in a warm place. (Dough will not rise significantly.) Knead the dough until smooth and shiny, an additional 3 or so minutes. Divide the dough into 6 equal parts. Form balls and then flattened discs and set aside to rest for another half hour.

Roll each disc into a circle with a 6-inch diameter. (If the dough is still very elastic, let it rest a while longer.) Brush on the melted butter and sprinkle on a thin dusting of flour. Fold the circle in half, then in quarters. With your fingers, reshape the dough into a round disc and then roll it out on a floured board to a diameter of about 9 inches. Repeat with each piece.

Brush a griddle with melted butter and heat until a drop of water will sizzle. Cook each roti over medium-high heat until the top bubbles and there are spots of brown on the bottom, about 1 minute. Grease the griddle and turn the roti to brown on the other side. If large air bubbles form, pound them down with a spatula. Wrap the roti in aluminum foil, keeping them warm until needed. (Roti may be rewarmed by placing them in a 250-degree oven for about 1 minute.) POTATO-CHICK PEA FILLING (Fills 6 roti) 2 tablespoons clarified butter (or 1 tablespoon each oil and butter) 1 teaspoon ground turmeric 1 1/2 pounds potatoes, peeled and diced into 1/2-inch cubes 1 tablespoon ground coriander seed (preferably freshly ground in a mortar or spice grinder) 3/4 cup cooked chick peas 1/2 teaspoon finely minced garlic 1/2 small green pepper, minced 1/4 teaspoon thyme 1/2 teaspoon salt Fresh ground pepper to taste Chopped chili pepper and Angostua bitters to taste (optional) Optional garnish: tamarind paste

In a large saucepan, heat the butter. Stir in 1/2 teaspoon of the turmeric. Dry the cubed potatoes with paper towels and fry them over medium heat for 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Add the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of turmeric, the coriander, chick peas, garlic, green pepper, thyme, salt and pepper and cook for 1 minute. Then add 1 cup of water and the chopped chili and Angostura bitters to taste, if desired. Stir to blend and cook, covered, over medium heat until the potatoes are soft, about 12 to 15 minutes.

To prepare roti, spread a thin layer of tamarind paste on the bread, if desired. Then place about 1/2 cup of the filling down the center. Fold over one third of the bread and then the other third, envelope fashion, and place the roti on a plate with the seam down.

SHRIMP CURRY FILLING (Fills 6 roti) 1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns 1/4 teaspoon crushed hot red peppers (optional) 1/2 teaspoon black mustard seeds 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds 2 1/2 teaspoons coriander seeds 1 large bay leaf 1/4 teaspoon thyme 3 tablespoons clarified butter (or 2 tablespoons oil and 1 tablespoon butter) 2 medium-sized onions (about 12 ounces), finely chopped 1/4 cup finely chopped chives or scallion greens 1 teaspoon turmeric 1 1/2 teaspoons finely minced garlic 2 teaspoons peeled and finely minced ginger 1 1/4 pounds small shrimp, peeled, cleaned, and halved 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice Salt and Angostura bitters to taste (optional)

Optional garnish: tamarind paste

In a mortar or a spice grinder, grind the first seven ingredients to a powder. Set aside. In a large saucepan, melt the butter. Saute' the onions until golden. Add the chives or scallions, ground spices, turmeric, garlic and ginger and cook an additional minute. Add 1 cup of water and bring to a boil, mixing well. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes. (Sauce should be thick.) Add the shrimp and cook over medium-high heat, stirring constantly, until the shrimp are done, about 3 to 5 minutes. Add lime juice and, if desired, salt and Angostura bitters. Adjust seasonings.

To prepare roti, spread a thin layer of tamarind paste on the bread, if desired. Then place about 1/2 cup of the filling down the center. Fold over one third of the bread and then the other third, envelope fashion, and place the roti on a plate with the seam down.