David and Nikki Goldbeck, authors of the new "American Wholefoods Cuisine," have outlined wholefoods programs for these common household situations: Busy Singles

* Keep a minimal wholefoods pantry stocked with condiments such as pepperocinis (pickled peppers), pickles, olives and other foods that keep a long time and help to vary a diet that leans heavily on salads and sandwiches.

* Freeze whole-grain breads and baked goods and keep a stock of whole-grain crackers. "The more good things you have in the house, the more good things you will tend to eat," says David.

* Take advantage of single dining--you can try small servings of expensive foods that large families can't afford.

* Invite coworkers or friends to dinner. Not only do you alleviate lonely meals, but if the person reciprocates, it decreases your cooking responsibility.

* Develop a small repertoire of recipes that you like and know how to make. You can modify these standard recipes as mood, budget and time allow. Single Working Parents

* Establish a pantry of wholefoods that store well.

* When you do find time to cook, make extra portions and freeze them in batches appropriate for a family dinner.

* Cook with your child. This increases your family time and your child's interest in and enthusiasm for food. "If they make it," says Goldbeck, "they'll eat it."

* Develop a short-order repertoire so that even if "time and interest and patience is limited," these foods are readily obtainable.

* Cook late at night when the house is quiet and use it as a relaxation technique. Large Families

* More family members means an increased chance that there will be interest in new food, so take the opportunity to experiment.

* Involve individual family members in menu selection, offering them a choice among alternatives, for instance.

* Encourage other family members to cook occasionally.

* Make sure that new foods are introduced among a selection of more familiar foods.

* "Never tell anybody that something is healthful," says Goldbeck. "The whole 'Eat your spinach' idea is what we're trying to get away from."