In last Sunday's story on the Kilpatrick picnic, the amount of unflavored gelatin in the recipes was unclear. Here are the recipes with the correct amounts: POACHED SALMON IN ASPIC (20 servings) 2 cups dry white wine 2 8-ounce bottles clam juice 2 carrots, sliced 2 onions, sliced 1 stalk celery 3 tablespoons salt Bouquet garni (sprigs of thyme, marjoram, parsley, savory tied together with string) 1 whole salmon, 8 to 10 pounds 2 1/4-ounce envelopes unflavored gelatin Thinly sliced cucumber, sliced green olives, sprigs of parsley or fresh dill, thinly sliced lemons for garnish Make a court bouillon of the wine, clam juice, vegetables and seasonings. Boil together 20 minutes and pour into fish poacher. Lower salmon into hot stock adding enough water to barely cover fish. Simmer gently until fish flakes easily, about 5 to 10 minutes per pound of fish. Remove from heat and cool fish in stock. While fish is still slightly warm, move it to a fish platter. Remove skin and backbone carefully. Chill fish. Strain stock through cheesecloth. Soften 2 envelopes gelatin in 4 cups stock, reducing amount of gelatin proportionally if there is less stock. Heat gently to dissolve. Cool until syrupy. Coat chilled salmon with aspic and chill until set. Apply decorations of thinly sliced cucumber, sliced green olives, sprigs of parsley or fresh dill and thinly sliced lemons. Coat again with aspic. (If aspic becomes too stiff, soften by placing container in a bowl of warm water.) Chill and repeat, making a total of three coats of aspic. SALMON MOUSSE (10 to 12 servings) 3 1/4-ounce envelopes unflavored gelatin 1 1/2 cups bottled clam juice 2 15 1/2-ounce cans pink salmon 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/2 cup sour cream Olives, pimiento, parsley for garnish Soften gelatin in 1/2 cup clam juice and dissolve in 1 cup hot clam juice. Place in a blender half the gelatin mixture, 1 can of salmon and half of the mayonnaise and sour cream. Blend and repeat with second half of ingredients. Decorate a cold we

DUST ROSE on Rappahannock County, Va., roads last Saturday as cars streamed in 75 miles from the city for the start of James J. Kilpatrick's 11th annual Fourth Estate Field Day. "This is the most informal party known to man," said Kilpo (the political columnist's college nickname) as he waved guests toward a do-it-yourself card-table bar on the deck of the contemporary farmhouse, hub of the Kilpatrick compound spread across newly mown hayfields on the eastern slope of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

The invitation is always the same (witty), the menu is always the same (great), the guests are always mostly press (a mixed bag of celebrities and just good friends). "I wouldn't dare change it," said Marie Kilpatrick, who does the cooking for 150 people. It's a format that works so well it has become a genuine Washington tradition.

The invitation reads that the party "will be run off, swum off, or staggered off . . . tennis players come by 10 o'clock, swimmers at noon, boozers at one. Luncheon will be served promptly at two. Owing to last year's disgraceful episode, the high hurdles will not be held this year; new judges have been named . . ."

It is a five-acre-wide party where guests park in a field across from the hilltop ten-nis court, watch CBS newsman Fred Graham try to find the sweet spot on his tennis racket, or wander down to the greenhouse that serves as hothouse for Kilpatrick's orchid collection and home to a full-size swimming pool where children in all sizes are splashing.

Sweaty guests in headbands and ace bandages collapse under trees in small groups or socialize on the deck wonderfully shaded by a world-class chestnut oak.

The latest Kilpatrick grandbaby in pink dress is passed from lap to lap. Usually immaculate anchorman Ted Koppel has rumpled hair, shirttail out of his tennis whites and is trying to keep track of three rapidly moving pre-teens. Miss Manners, Judith Martin, in white victorian sailor dress, is seated primly on the grass discussing how mothers-in-law should be addressed.

Over paper plates, Martin Agronsky talks shop with the talk show competitors, Pat Buchanan of WRC, Jack Nelson, Los Angeles Times, and Betty Cole Dukert, Meet the Press producer.

Retired senator Harry Byrd and his wife, Gretchen, drove over from their home in Winchester where he is still tinkering with the balanced budget amendment.

Presiding over it all is artist Marie Pietri Kilpatrick, a small, fragile woman, a sculptor who turned to paint brushes when arthritis stiffened her elbows.

Tiny she may be, faint-hearted she is not.

It was Marie who said one day, "Why not have Ron and Nancy out again?" After all, they had been there before, so the invitation was extended to President and Mrs. Reagan in March 1981. Plans came to a halt when two weeks later, the President lay wounded in George Washington University hospital.

But it was to the Kilpatrick compound known as White Walnut Hill that the Reagans went for their first outing after the incident. With two week's notice, Marie put together the party, cooking a salmon-in-aspic luncheon for 20, plus feeding a White House auxiliary team and White House press herded behind a rail fence.

She remembers the exact moment when she stopped being nervous and the whole operation became wonderfully ludicrous. It was when the security team, with bomb-sniffing dog, knocked on her door for the third time to once again "sweep" her house for explosives. Twice before they had trudged across her polished floors, inspected her bureau drawers and looked into closets. Each time, she and Hilda Alther, her longtime housekeeper, followed them with broom and vacuum.

When she opened the door the third time and found them standing there, this five-foot-tall woman who is close to the weight of a bomb-sniffing dog, looked up and said, "Enough." She told them they would have to go to the back door, remove their shoes and towel down the dog.

Her next vision was of five towering security men, sock-footed, tip-toeing through the rooms. One of them was carrying the sniffing black labrador.

Brown-eyed Marie, granddaughter of Corsicans, likes to tell the story that Napoleon said he could smell Corsica from vast distances at sea because the wind carried the fragrance of the wild herbs that mantle the rocky hillsides.

Now Marie has those same bushy herbs growing beside her driveway, and it was her home you could smell for vast distances last week as she basted hams with madeira and splashed vinaigrette into hot macaroni.

Jack, in khaki shorts, and his assistant, Jinnie Beattie, came over from his office in the original farmhouse for lunch in the antique-filled kitchen while Marie was cooking. Quietly, he cleared the table, moved to the sink, emptied the dishwasher, neatly shelved the glasses.

"I am one of the world's great dishwashers." This was said, almost shyly, by one of America's fiercest conservative warriors.

Outside, yellow shotgun shell casings sparkle like an occasional dandelion on the lawn, testimony to a tougher Jack's tenacious battle with a groundhog for possession of the lettuce.

"Marie was in tears last week over the lettuce," he said with the same outrage he reserves for Agronsky and Company, the TV show that much of Washington tunes to on Saturday evenings.

"You don't see any corpses, do you?" said son Sean Kilpatrick, who loaned his father the shotgun. "My father's weapon of choice is words." A groundhog appeared to be ahead in the argument with a master debater.

The flower and vegetable gardens, an outdoor gallery, are the province of Marie, the impressionist painter. Neatly raised beds of vegetables are accented with her marble and stone sculptures. Surrounding it all are fences with espaliered pear and apple trees.

Usually there are wine bottles attached to the fences with pears growing inside the bottles. But spring rains this year drowned the pollen from the blossoms. In past years, fruit ripened in the bottles, stems were cut, the bottles with the fruit inside carefully washed and inspected for bugs, dried thoroughly and then filled with brandy and stoppered. About six months later, pear brandy is ready for sipping.

The logistics of feeding 150 people out of a family kitchen are formidable--one of the reasons the menu never varies for the Saturday party. There is no team of caterers hustling behind the scenes of this party. It is all Marie's operation with the help of Alther. Wednesday is shopping day in Culpeper; Thursday, the hams are baked; Friday the macaroni salad is assembled and all the relatives and grandchildren are enlisted to chop and peel fruit for the watermelon baskets. By Friday night, they are out of space in her two refrigerators and food is placed on ice in picnic coolers. Saturday, Alther "fries" the chicken. Actually, it's a frozen version that is reheated in the oven and everyone loves it and wants the recipe.

In addition to the main dishes there are small rolls, a relish tray with olives, apple butter and homemade relishes that vary depending on the harvest from her garden. Dessert is Girl Scout cookies, a favor to the granddaughters who know a good customer when they see her.

Here are some of the favorite Kilpatrick recipes. The salmon in aspic was served for the Reagan luncheon. Some are the press picnic recipes, others are family favorites. POACHED SALMON IN ASPIC (20 servings)

Marie Kilpatrick used the army to help her with this recipe when she had lunch for the President. The communications team arrived five days in advance to set up equipment that keeps the President in touch with the world. They were put to extra duty in the kitchen. Whenever the whole poached salmon needed to be pulled from the refrigerator and given another coat of aspic, they came running and "hauled the whale" from the refrigerator for tiny Marie. 2 cups dry white wine 2 8-ounce bottles clam juice 2 carrots, sliced 2 onions, sliced 1 stalk celery 3 tablespoons salt Bouquet garni (sprigs of thyme, marjoram, parsley, savory tied together with string) 1 whole salmon, 8 to 10 pounds 2 ounces (2 envelopes) unflavored gelatin Thinly sliced cucumber, sliced green olives, sprigs of parsley or fresh dill, thinly sliced lemons for garnish

Make a court bouillon of the wine, clam juice, vegetables and seasonings. Boil together 20 minutes and pour into fish poacher. Lower salmon into hot stock, adding enough water to barely cover fish. Simmer gently until fish flakes easily, about 5 to 10 minutes per pound of fish.

Remove from heat and cool fish in stock. While fish is still slightly warm, move it to a fish platter. Remove skin and backbone carefully. Chill fish. Strain stock through cheesecloth. Soften 2 ounces gelatin in 4 cups stock, reducing amount of gelatin proportionally if there is less stock. Heat gently to dissolve. Cool until syrupy. Coat chilled salmon with aspic and chill until set. Apply decorations of thinly sliced cuccumber, sliced green olives, sprigs of parsley or fresh dill and thinly sliced lemons. Coat again with aspic. (If aspic becomes too stiff, soften by placing container in a bowl of warm water.) Chill and repeat, making a total of three coats of aspic. BAKED HAM WITH MADEIRA

Marie Kilpatrick orders from Richmond the Gwaltney Pagan hams that are dry-cured and smoked with no water added. They are available in the Washington area at some supermarkets, sometimes only during holiday season. 1 whole ham, pre-cooked 1/2 cup madeira wine

Skin the ham and place uncovered in a 325-degree oven for 45 minutes. Begin basting with the wine. (Caution: madeira has a tendency to flame up.) Baste every 15 to 20 minutes, cooking the ham a total of 2 hours. Cool and refrigerate. Slice thinly and serve with rolls. MARIE KILPATRICK'S MACARONI SALAD

To give 150 people a taste, Kilpatrick cooks four pounds of elbow macaroni to the al dente stage, drains it and places it in a large container. Kilpatrick uses a large enamel canning kettle. Immediately, while the pasta is still hot, she sprinkles over it a homemade french dressing in proportions of 1/3 red wine vinegar and 2/3 olive oil mixed with salt, freshly ground black pepper and assorted minced herbs from the garden. To the base she adds lots of chopped celery, scallions, green olives and fresh dill. But the most important ingredient is chopped pimiento. She roasts her own homegrown red peppers in the fall, freezes them, then uses them liberally in this recipe to produce an almost rosy macaroni salad. A light touch of mayonnaise is added to bind the ingredients. SALMON MOUSSE (10 to 12 servings)

Kilpatrick often serves this for cool summer suppers with deviled eggs and potato salad. 3 envelopes (3 ounces) unflavored gelatin 1 1/2 cups bottled clam juice 2 15 1/2-ounce cans pink salmon 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/2 cup sour cream Olives, pimiento, parsley for garnish

Soften gelatin in 1/2 cup clam juice and dissolve in 1 cup hot clam juice. Place in a blender half the gelatin mixture, 1 can of salmon and half of the mayonnaise and sour cream. Blend and repeat with second half of ingredients. Decorate a cold wet fish mold with olives, pimiento and parsley. Add the fish mixture and chill overnight. Unmold to serve. CAPONATA ALLA SICILIANA (6 servings)

This works well as a cold vegetable or an antipasto with an Italian dinner. It will keep for over a week in the refrigerator. 2/3 cup olive oil 1 large eggplant, peeled, cut into 1-inch cubes 1 1/2 cups diced onions 1 cup diced celery 16-ounce can plum tomatoes, diced 1/4 cup red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon garlic salt Black pepper, freshly ground 1 teaspoon sugar 1/2 cup black olives, chopped 2 tablespoons capers, drained

Heat half the olive oil in a skillet. Saute' eggplant until lightly browned. Remove and add rest of olive oil. Saute' onions 10 minutes. Add celery and tomatoes, cook 20 minutes over low heat. Add vinegar, eggplant and remaining ingredients. Cover and cook over low heat 15 to 20 minutes, stirring frequently. Cool and chill. CHICKEN MARENGO (4 to 6 servings)

This dish, said Kilpatrick, supposedly originated on the battlefield when Napoleon's chef found himself with nothing to serve for dinner. He scrounged the chicken, wild mushrooms and tomatoes. Wine, of course, was a staple. A classic was born. The beauty of the recipe is that it improves with age and is best made, then refrigerated, the day before it is served. 3 pounds chicken parts or breasts 3 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 large onion, sliced 1/2 pound mushrooms, sliced 2 tablespoons flour 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1/2 to 3/4 cup dry white wine Salt

Lightly brown chicken parts in butter and oil in a heavy frying pan. Remove to ovenproof casserole. To the skillet juices add the sliced onion, and cook until golden. Add mushrooms and cook 2 more minutes. Sprinkle with flour and remove from heat. Add tomato paste, wine and salt to taste and return to heat, stirring until sauce bubbles. If sauce is too thick, add more wine. Pour over chicken, cover and bake at 350 degrees 20 to 30 minutes. If refrigerated before cooking, return to room temperature before baking. CUCUMBER IN ASPIC (6 to 8 servings) Salt for sprinkling on cucumbers 2 cups peeled, diced cucumbers 3 envelopes (3 ounces) unflavored gelatin 1 cup cold chicken stock 1/4 cup white (or red garlic) vinegar 2 tablespoons fresh dill or 1 tablespoon dried 2 slices onion, chopped 1/3 cup parsley 1 1/2 cups sour cream 1/4 cup mayonnaise Hot pepper sauce to taste

Salt cucumbers and let stand 20 to 30 minutes. Sprinkle gelatin over cold stock and vinegar. Stir over low heat until dissolved. Add dill. Drain cucumber and pure'e in blender with onion and parsley. Add gelatin, blend to mix. Chill until thick and syrupy. Beat in sour cream, mayonnaise and hot sauce. Pour into chilled wet mold and refrigerate. Unmold to serve.