The Express Lane recipe for Lemon Chicken Breasts with Mushrooms on Sept. 29 had an incorrect listing for potassium content. The corrected recipe is: LEMON CHICKEN BREASTS WITH MUSHROOMS (4 servings) 2 whole chicken breasts, cut in half, skin and fat removed 1 tablespoon tub margarine 1/4 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced 1 tablespoon chopped scallions 1 lemon 2 tablespoons sherry or white wine Saute' chicken breasts in margarine until brown. Remove from skillet. Saute' mushrooms and scallions in skillet. Cut half of the lemon into slices and add to mushroom mixture. Squeeze juice from the other half of the lemon. Add juice and wine to mushroom mixture. Return chicken breasts to skillet, spooning mixture over them and reheat for about 5 minutes. Be careful not to overcook. Nutrition information per serving: 187 calories, 5.9 grams fat (53 calories), 1.4 grams saturated fat (13 calories), 1.8 grams monounsaturated fat (16 calories), 2 grams polyunsaturated fat (18 calories), 67 milligrams cholesterol, 94 milligrams sodium, 244 milligrams potassium, 3 grams carbohydrate, 28 grams protein.

Government agencies and health organizations continue to urge Americans to cut down on their intake of fat and cholesterol to help prevent diseases such as heart disease and cancer. But the food industry has yet to support this advice by informing consumers about just what they are eating, say Senators Howard M. Metzenbaum (D-Ohio) and Paula Hawkins (R-Fla.).

That's why the two senators introduced legislation last Tuesday which would require that food manufacturers state on their labels the total number of calories, as well as amounts of fat, sodium and cholesterol that the product contains.

Called the Nutritional Information Labeling Act of 1985, the proposed amendment to the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act also asks manufacturers to list the specific name of the fat or oil used ("and/or" labeling would be prohibited) and a quantitative breakdown of the types of fat (saturated, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated).

The bill is being endorsed by the American Heart Association and the American Cancer Society and two consumer groups, Public Voice for Food and Health Policy and the Center for Science in the Public Interest.

At the present time, nutrition labeling is voluntary. Only manufacturers whose products carry a nutritional claim are required to list a nutritional breakdown of their food.

According to Roger Coleman, spokesman for the National Food Processors Association, voluntary labeling has thus far been successful. "We've NFPA always taken the stance that we can do better on a voluntary basis than if we're locked into a rigid formula," he said. Coleman pointed to current NFPA figures which indicate that 65 percent of the products manufactured by 140 major food companies contain sodium labeling, and that slightly more than half of all food products already contain nutritional labeling.

It's all how you look at the numbers, however. Ellen Haas, executive director of Public Voice for Food and Health Policy, said that the percentages show that the government's voluntary sodium labeling policy doesn't work.

Metzenbaum said that the bill's labeling requirements are "not so difficult" for companies to provide, pointing to two products, Kraft Mayonnaise and Planter's Sunflower Seeds, which already provide consumers with complete fat and cholesterol information. Coleman, who said he had not yet seen the details of the Metzenbaum-Hawkins bill, said there is a "heavy cost" to manufacturers in performing the analyses necessary to make these label declarations, particularly the breakdown of fats.

Metzenbaum also pointed to two products, Keebler's Club Crackers and a Hostess apple pie, as examples of the confusion created by "and/or" labeling, in which manufacturers are not required to list the specific type of fat in their products. This labeling exception was originally granted to manufacturers in the late 1970s, due to fluctuations in price and availability of fats and oils, according to the FDA.

Metzenbaum said that the ingredient label from the Hostess pie reading "made with partially hydrogenated vegetable and/or animal shortening (contains one or more of the following: soybean oil, cottonseed oil, palm oil, beef fat, lard)," makes it virtually impossible for those trying to avoid specific types of fats to do so.

Public hearings on the legislation begin on October 10, and it may be a while before any legislation is passed, but in the meantime, here is an Express Lane meal followed by information similar to that being requested in the Nutrition Information Labeling Act. You will need pepper, tub margarine and vegetable oil on your shelf before heading to the store. If your express lane allows another item, make sure to pick up some garlic to add seasoning to the baked zucchini.

EXPRESS LANE LIST: chicken breasts, mushrooms, scallions, lemon, sherry or white wine, zucchini, tomatoes, green pepper, garlic (if your express lane allows another item). LEMON CHICKEN BREASTS WITH MUSHROOMS (4 servings) 2 whole chicken breasts, cut in half, skin and fat removed 1 tablespoon tub margarine 1/4 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced 1 tablespoon chopped scallions 1 lemon 2 tablespoons sherry or white wine

Saute' chicken breasts in margarine until brown. Remove from skillet.

Saute' mushrooms and onions in skillet. Cut half of the lemon into slices and add to mushroom mixture. Squeeze juice from the other half of the lemon. Add juice and wine to mushroom mixture.

Return chicken breasts to skillet, spooning mixture over them and reheat for about 5 minutes. Be careful not to overcook.

Nutrition information per serving: 187 calories, 5.9 grams fat (53 calories), 1.4 grams saturated fat (13 calories), 1.8 grams monounsaturated fat (16 calories), 2 grams polyunsaturated fat (18 calories), 67 milligrams cholesterol, 94 milligrams sodium, 504 milligrams potassium, 3 grams carbohydrate, 28 grams protein. From "The Living Heart Diet" by Michael E. DeBakey, Antonio M. Gotto, Jr., Lynne W. Scott, John P. Foreyt (Simon and Schuster, $19.95) BAKED ZUCCHINI (6 servings) 1 pound zucchini, sliced 1/4 cup sliced scallions 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 3 tomatoes, chopped 1/4 teaspoon pepper 2 cloves garlic, minced (optional) 1/2 green bell pepper, chopped

Saute' zucchini and scallions in oil. Place in casserole and top with remaining ingredients. Cover and bake 30 minutes at 350 degrees.

Nutrition information per serving: 43 calories, 2.4 grams fat (22 calories), 0.3 grams saturated fat (3 calories), 0.6 grams monounsaturated fat (5 calories), 1.5 grams polyunsaturated fat (14 calories), 0 milligrams cholesterol, 4 milligrams sodium, 232 milligrams potassium, 1 gram protein, 5 grams carbohydrate.

From "The Living Heart Diet" by Michael E. DeBakey, Antonio M. Gotto, Jr., Lynne W. Scott, John P. Foreyt (Simon and Schuster, $19.95)