The recipe for Shanghai Scallion Pancakes in the Food section on April 16 contained an incorrect measurement. The corrected version follows: SHANGHAI SCALLION PANCAKES (Makes 12 6-inch pancakes) 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 cup boiling water 1/2 cup cold water 2 tablespoons dark sesame oil 1/2 cup scallions, minced Salt to taste Vegetable oil for frying Place the flour in a bowl and stir in the boiling and then the cold water. Knead the dough about 5 minutes until smooth and elastic. Form into a ball, pat with vegetable oil and wrap in plastic film. Set in a warm place to rest 30 minutes. On a lightly floured board, roll the dough into a square 1/4-inch thick and spread with about 2 tablespoons dark sesame oil. Sprinkle evenly with the scallions and salt to taste and roll up, pinching the seam tightly together. Cut crosswise into 12 equal rounds. Place a round, cut side down, on a lightly floured surface and using a rolling pin, roll it out into a 6-inch pancake. Heat a 1/4 inch of oil in a heavy skillet and fry the pancake over moderate heat, about 2 minutes per side or until golden. Watch that they don't brown too quickly. Repeat with remaining rounds, adding more oil as needed. Keep cooked pancakes in a warm oven until served.

The Chinese culinary tradition offers us few breads, and the ones it does often don't compare with the golden crusty loaves offered by many western cultures. Rarely baked, often steamed and sometimes fried, Chinese breads aren't always favorites with Americans.

The famous scallion pancakes of Shanghai, on the other hand, are not only universally likable, but easy to make and the ideal accompaniment to many Oriental dishes.

Though variations of scallion pancakes are known throughout China, Shanghai Scallion Pancakes are the most notable dim sum of Shanghai. They are crisp-fried breads that are traditionally made by rolling minced scallions up in a thin round of wheat flour dough that has been brushed with fragrant sesame oil. The roll is coiled around itself, pinwheel fashion, and rolled flat again before being pan fried to a golden crispness.

A quicker but just as tasty version follows in which the dough is rolled out in a single square. It is filled, rolled and sliced as is done in the preparation of cinnamon rolls. The slices are then rolled flat into pancakes and quickly fried until crisp and golden.

Scallion pancakes can be made several hours in advance and reheated in a hot oven just before serving. They can also be frozen, individually wrapped in plastic wrap, in their uncooked state, thawed overnight in the refrigerator and fried just before serving. Whether served with a simple family stir-fry or as part of a multicourse Asian meal, they will provide a chewy-crisp contrast to other dishes.

But don't limit their use to Oriental menus. Scallion pancakes go well with most soups and salads and with almost anything from the grill. Their filling can be varied by the addition of a little minced cilantro, garlic or fresh ginger. They can turn into a main course or an adjunct to a summer fruit salad by adding a little minced ham or Chinese lap cheong sausage along with the scallions. SHANGHAI SCALLION PANCAKES (Makes 12 6-inch pancakes)

2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1 1/2 cups boiling water

1/2 cup cold water

2 tablespoons dark sesame oil

1/2 cup scallions, minced

Salt to taste

Vegetable oil for frying

Place the flour in a bowl and stir in the boiling and then the cold water. Knead the dough about 5 minutes until smooth and elastic. Form into a ball, pat with vegetable oil and wrap in plastic film. Set in a warm place to rest 30 minutes. On a lightly floured board, roll the dough into a square 1/4-inch thick and spread with about 2 tablespoons dark sesame oil. Sprinkle evenly with the scallions and salt to taste; roll up, pinching the seam tightly together. Cut crosswise into 12 equal rounds.

Place a round, cut side down, on a lightly floured surface and using a rolling pin, roll it out into a 6-inch pancake. Heat 1/4 inch oil in a heavy skillet and fry the pancake over moderate heat about 2 minutes per side or until golden. Watch that they don't brown too quickly. Repeat with remaining rounds, adding more oil as needed. Keep cooked pancakes in a warm oven until served.