Cinnamon was omitted from the recipe for Cinnamon Swirl Bread in the Food section last Wednesday. The corrected version is on Page E3. (Published 2/3/88)

No better scent emanates from the kitchen than the aroma of bread baking. Few tastes are more delicious than that of a hand-kneaded, yeasty and warm loaf of bread, or a rapidly blended batch of cornbread enriched with buttermilk, or biscuits made up with riced sweet potatoes to look like pillows.

These home-style American breads, be they coarse-textured and crusty, or tender and light, are culinary heirlooms which, it is to be thanked, are regaining popularity.

Fine-grained dinner rolls made from a satiny dough are now appearing in bread baskets along with thick slices of creamy white potato bread, nudging out the once-standard French baguette. Lovely, melt-in-your-mouth dinner rolls have been spotted gracing platesful of chicken fricassee, country ham, and roasted chicken. Plump bran muffins, nourishing and full of the taste of natural bran, get warmed or toasted up at breakfast, replacing the sugary danish and doughnut. The bran muffins that follow are made from an old, old recipe passed to me from my grandmother who, long ago, snagged the formula from a local baker's wife.

The medley of breads offered here is especially wholesome; they use pure, fresh ingredients and are quite satisfying to make. The quick breads -- sweet potato biscuits, buttermilk corn bread, bran muffins -- can be mixed to their oven-ready state in a few minutes, and thus become a luxurious addition to any meal. Freshly baked biscuits are enticing when served with a great plate of fried chicken and fixings; squares of corn bread go well with anything creamed, roasted pork or stuffed pork chops, or bowls of spicy chili, in addition to any bean-laden dish; and, the rich bran muffins are most welcome at Sunday brunch when served with an egg-based dish.

Both the potato bread and rolls make a pleasant accompaniment to Sunday supper; they freeze very well and can be entrusted to cold storage for a few weeks before rewarming and serving. Too, slices of potato bread are good toasted, buttered and slathered with jam. The cinnamon bread, cut into thick slabs, also makes good toast; stale bread slices dipped in a batter of beaten egg, milk and vanilla creates a fine french toast. Trimmed and buttered, week-old slices of cinnamon bread form the base for a wonderful bread pudding (simply cover over with an eggy custard batter and bake).

Herewith, recipes for some delightfully old-fashioned breads that never fail to please: CINNAMON SWIRL BREAD (Makes two 9-by-5-by-3-inch loaves)

A swirl of cinnamon-sugar winds its way through this simple white bread. As a variation, I like to sprinkle the tops of the bread with a crumble of brown sugar and cinnamon just before the loaves are sent into the oven. Baking loaves of this bread perfumes the house through and through.

6 cups unsifted all-purpose flour, approximately, plus additional flour, as necessary

1/3 cup granulated sugar

2 teaspoons salt

2 packages active dry yeast (each package is 1/4 ounce)

1 1/2 cups milk

1/4 cup water

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut up into chunks

3 large or extra-large eggs, at room temperature

FOR THE CINNAMON-SUGAR FILLING:

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened at room temperature

1/2 cup granulated sugar blended with 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon granulated sugar

In a large mixing bowl, combine 5 cups of the unsifted flour, sugar, salt and yeast. In a saucepan, heat the milk, water and butter to 125 degrees (very warm); the butter need not melt entirely. Remove from the heat and pour over the flour mixture. Add the eggs and beat well with a wooden spoon until a slightly sticky dough is formed. Beat in the remaining flour, blending it in with your hands, to make a fairly stiff dough. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured wooden board and knead for 8 to 10 minutes, adding additional flour as necessary, to form a dough that is smooth and elastic. Turn the dough into a lightly buttered bowl, coating all sides of the dough ball with a thin film of butter, cover with a sheet of plastic wrap or kitchen towel and let rise in a cozy, draft-free spot until doubled in bulk, about 2 hours.

Punch down the dough, and divide in half. On a lightly floured board, roll half the dough into a 10-by-10-inch square; smear 1 tablespoon (half) of the butter over the surface of the dough and sprinkle with 1/4 cup (half) of the cinnamon-sugar blend. Roll up the dough, jellyroll fashion, tucking in the ends. Fashion the dough into a loaf, plumping it up. Place the formed loaf in a well-buttered 9-by-5-by-3-inch loaf pan. Repeat with the remaining half of dough, rolling, filling with spiced sugar and forming into a loaf.

Cover the loaves of bread loosely with a sheet of plastic wrap and let stand in a warm spot until the loaf has risen just above the top of the loaf pan, about 1 1/2 hours.

Bake the loaves on the lower third level rack of a 375-degree oven for about 35 to 40 minutes, or until each loaf sounds hollow when gently eased from the pan and tapped on the bottom with your knuckles.

Remove the loaves from the pan and let them stand on wire cooling racks.

Baking note: To make the crumble topping mentioned previously, combine 1/4 cup tightly packed brown sugar and 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon. Just before the loaves go into the oven, brush them lightly with a little beaten egg white, and sprinkle half of the sugar evenly over the top of each loaf. If the loaves seem to brown too fast while they are baking, place a tent of aluminum foil over the top to protect them. SOFT DINNER ROLLS (Makes about eighteen 2 3/4-inch dinner rolls)

These rolls are light, fine-grained and buttery -- they are a tasty companion to such hearty fare as smothered chicken, roasted pork, pot roast and like food. While I love them fresh and hot out of the oven, the rolls do freeze quite well; wrap up the rolls individually, then arrange them, in one layer, in heavy food storage bags and freeze. Defrost the rolls in the refrigerator before reheating them in an aluminum foil pouch.

3 3/4 cups unsifted all-purpose flour, approximately, plus additional flour as necessary

2 teaspoons salt

1/4 cup granulated sugar

1 package active dry yeast ( 1/4 ounce package)

1 cup milk

1/4 cup water

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into chunks

1 extra-large egg, at room temperature

TO FINISH THE ROLLS:

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

In a large mixing bowl, combine 2 3/4 cups of the all-purpose flour, salt, sugar, and yeast. In a saucepan, heat the milk, water, and butter to 125 degrees (very warm); the butter need not melt entirely. Remove from the heat and pour over the flour mixture. Add the egg and beat well with a wooden spoon or paddle until a lightly sticky dough is formed. Add the remaining 1 cup of flour, several tablespoons at a time, and continue mixing until the dough is no longer sticky, using your hands as the dough stiffens up. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured wooden board and knead for 8 to 9 minutes, adding additional flour as necessary if the dough is especially sticky (depending on the weather -- humidity in the air -- and the absorption quality of the flour), to form a soft, supple, silky dough.

Turn the dough into a lightly buttered bowl, coating all sides of the dough ball with a thin haze of butter. Cover the dough with a towel or sheet of plastic wrap, set the bowl in a warm, draft-free spot, and let the dough rise until it has doubled in bulk, about 1 1/2 to 2 hours. Butter eighteen 2 3/4-inch muffin tins; set aside.

Punch down the dough on a lightly floured board; with your hands, roll out a long, thick sausage of dough. Cut the dough into 18 pieces. Out of each piece, form 3 round balls. Dip the balls quickly in the melted butter and arrange them, touching, in the muffin tin. Repeat with the rest of the dough gobs, filling up the remaining muffin tins.

Cover the tins loosely with sheets of plastic wrap, and set aside to rise until the rolls have doubled in bulk, about 1 hour 15 minutes.

Drizzle any remaining melted butter over the top of the rolls and bake them on the lower third level rack of a 400-degree oven for 15 to 18 minutes, or until they are golden on top and the rolls have retreated slightly from the edges of the muffin tins.

Turn out the rolls onto a wire cooling rack. Serve the rolls warm, with sweet butter. POTATO BREAD (Makes two 8 1/2-by-4 1/2-by-3-inch loaves)

Each plump loaf of potato bread has a soft creamy interior, and lightly crisp crust. Warmed riced potatoes and the water in which the potatoes were cooked combine to make a bread that freezes beautifully.

Potato bread is good toasted, buttered, and topped with a fruit conserve or fruit butter.

3 medium baking potatoes, peeled and cut into quarters

Water to cover

5 to 5 1/2 cups unsifted all-purpose flour, approximately, plus additional flour as necessary

3 tablespoons granulated sugar

2 1/2 teaspoons salt

2 packages active dry yeast (each package is 1/4 ounce)

1/2 cup milk

7 tablespoons solid shortening

Place the potato quarters in a saucepan, pour on enough cold water to cover, place the lid on the saucepan and set over moderately high heat. When the water boils, reduce the heat to moderate and cook the potatoes until they are very tender. Remove the potatoes with a slotted spoon to a ricer, and rice them; keep warm. (There should be about 1 1/3 cups of potatoes.) Reserve the potato-cooking water.

In a large mixing bowl, combine 4 cups of the flour, sugar, salt, and yeast. Place the milk in a saucepan. Measure out 1/2 cup of the water in which the potatoes have cooked and add it to the milk. Heat both liquids until they reach 125 degrees (very warm). Remove from the heat and add the warm potatoes and solid shortening; stir well.

Add the potato mixture to the flour mixing, blending well with a wooden spoon or paddle.

Add the remaining 1 1/2 cups of flour a little at a time, to form a fairly stiff dough (the dough will slacken up a bit after the first rise), adding only as much flour as it takes to form a firm dough. Turn out the dough onto a wooden board and knead for 10 to 12 minutes, or until resilient and bouncy. Turn the dough into a buttered bowl, coating all sides of the ball of dough with a film of butter.

Cover the bowl with a sheet of plastic wrap or a kitchen towel and set in a warm spot to rise until doubled in bulk, about 2 hours.

Punch down the dough on a lightly floured board, cut in half, and shape each hunk of dough into a loaf. Place each loaf in a well-buttered 8 1/2-by-4 1/2-by-3-inch loaf pan.

Cover each loaf with a sheet of plastic wrap, and let rise in a warm spot until doubled in bulk, about 1 1/2 hours.

Bake the loaves on the lower third level rack of a 400-degree oven for 10 minutes, lower the oven temperature to 350-degrees and bake for about 25 to 30 minutes longer, or until each loaf sounds hollow when gently eased from the pan and tapped on the bottom with your knuckles.

Remove the loaves from the pan and let them stand on wire cooling racks. Serve the bread slightly warm or at room temperature. SWEET POTATO BISCUITS (Makes about 1 1/2 dozen biscuits)

Sweet potato biscuits are rich and flavorful; the dough is tinged by a measure of ground cinnamon and freshly grated nutmeg, both of which scent it softly. A bread basket filled with these biscuits is a fitting partner to a big platter of fried chicken, grilled pork, roasted duck or turkey.

2 cups unsifted all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

3/4 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

6 tablespoons solid shortening, cut into chunks, cold

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into chunks, cool

1 tablespoon granulated sugar

1 cup mashed sweet potato, at room temperature

1/3 cup whipping cream, cool

Thoroughly combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon and nutmeg in a large mixing bowl. Scatter over the chunks of shortening and butter and, using 2 round-bladed knives, cut in the fat until it is reduced to small shreds. With your fingertips, further break down the bits of fat until they are reduced to small pea-sized bits. Stir in the granulated sugar.

Blend together the mashed potatoes and whipping cream. Using a few swift strokes, blend the potato mixture into the flour mixture, forming a moderately soft dough. (Add a tablespoon or so of additional whipping cream if the dough seems unusually dry.)

Roll or pat the dough on a lightly floured wooden board to a thickness of 3/4-inch. Cut out biscuits using a 2-inch square cutter (or substitute a 2-inch round cutter). Lay the biscuits, 1 1/2-inches apart, on a lightly buttered baking sheet.

Bake the biscuits on the lower third level rack of a 450-degree oven for 12 to 14 minutes, or until puffed and lightly browned (watch the biscuits carefully as they have a tendency to brown very quickly.

Remove the biscuits to a wire cooling rack with a spatula. Serve the biscuits warm.

Baking note: The flour that I use in many biscuit recipes, and in this one for sweet potato biscuits, is White Lily unbleached flour. White Lily produces a light, tender biscuit; the flour is made from soft winter wheat and has a lower gluten strength than regular all-purpose flours. White Lily flour is available at Westlawn Supermarket (300 Annandale Rd., Falls Church, 237-5612) in 5-pound sacks for $1.05. BUTTERMILK CORN BREAD (Makes one 8-inch square corn bread)

This corn bread is solidly built: buttermilk, stone ground yellow corn meal, white flour and egg make up a fine-grained bread that cuts into neat, moist squares. Too, this corn bread can be flavored with freshly chopped herbs, such as minced thyme leaves, finely chopped sage leaves, or snipped chives. Prepare the herb, then toss well with the dry ingredients so that it mingles evenly in the batter (omit the sugar called for if using an herb in this recipe).

1 cup unsifted all-purpose flour

1 cup yellow corn meal, preferably stone ground

3 tablespoons granulated sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup buttermilk, at room temperature

1 extra-large or jumbo egg, at room temperature

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled

2 tablespoons solid shortening, melted and cooled

Thoroughly combine the flour, corn meal, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Beat together the buttermilk, egg, melted butter and melted shortening in a small bowl. Pour the liquid ingredients over the dry ingredients and combine both with a wooden spoon or paddle, using a minimum of strokes.

Pour and scrape the batter into a lightly buttered 8-inch square pan. Spread the batter evenly in the pan with a flexible spatula or palette knife.

Bake the bread on the lower third level rack of a 425-degree oven for 18 to 20 minutes, or until the bread lightly pulls away from the sides of the pan and a wooden pick inserted in the center of the bread withdraws clean and dry.

Cool the bread in the pan on a wire rack for several minutes, then cut into squares and serve warm, with whipped butter. FAVORITE BRAN MUFFINS (Makes about a dozen 2 3/4-inch muffins)

This recipe for bran muffins has been in my file for many, many years; the formula produces a light (almost light as cake) muffin, fortified with bran and enriched with a full cup of sour cream. The muffins reheat and freeze very well, but they are absolutely irresistible when tucked into a cloth-lined basket and served forth warm from the oven.

1 cup unsifted all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened at room temperature

1/4 cup light brown sugar, firmly packed

1 extra-large egg, at room temperature

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1 cup sour cream, at room temperature

1/4 cup light molasses

1 cup bran (Miller's bran is available in bulk at health food stores, and in boxes and plastic bags at most chain grocery sores that stock health foods -- do not substitute bran flakes cereal)

Sift the flour, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon onto a large sheet of waxed paper; set aside.

In a large bowl of an electric mixer, cream the softened butter on moderately high speed for 2 minutes. Beat in the brown sugar; beat 1 minute. Blend in the egg and vanilla, and continue beating on moderate speed for 1 minute. On low speed, blend in the sour cream and molasses, scraping down the sides of the bowl well with a rubber spatula to keep the batter even. By hand, stir in the bran and the sifted dry ingredients, blending just until the particles of flour have been absorbed, and not a moment longer. The batter will be slightly lumpy, and that's OK.

Divide the batter between 12 buttered and floured 2 3/4-inch muffin tins, filling each cup about two-thirds full. Bake the muffins on the lower third level rack of a 400-degree oven for 15 to 18 minutes, or until well-risen, plump, and a wooden pick inserted into the center of a muffin emerges clean and dry (also, the baked muffins will pull away slightly from the edges of the tin).

Let the muffins cool in the tin about 45 seconds, then gently remove to a wire cooling rack. Serve warm.