For the backyard griller, the flavors of the globe are an endless source of inspiration. But since authenticity may not be the number one priority of a cook with a fiery hot hibachi and a hungry crowd, many of the recipes below use traditional ethnic recipes or spice blends as a springboard, resulting in adaptations that can be made from ingredients available in many supermarkets.

When using dry rubs, add just enough oil to make a paste to help the spices adhere to the meat, seafood or poultry before grilling. When using marinades, remove the meat, poultry or seafood from the marinade then pat it dry before grilling to help eliminate flare-ups. For food safety reasons, if you have soaked meat, poultry or seafood in a marinade, then you cannot use that same marinade as a sauce as well. Instead, make the marinade and divide it, setting aside one half for sauce and using the other half to marinate the meat, poultry or seafood. Or, once you have removed the meat, poultry or seafood from the marinade, boil the marinade in a small saucepan for at least five minutes.

Adobo

Makes approximately 11/2 cups

Adobo (ah-DOH-boh) means "marinade" in Spanish; in Mexican cuisine it can be either a dry spice mixture, a wet paste, a marinade or a sauce. Adobo sauce, a dark red piquant paste, is made from chili peppers. Chipotle (chih-POHT-lay) chilis, which are actually dried, smoked jalapeno chilis, are often canned in adobo sauce. Both the fiery chilis and the smoky sauce are valuable ingredients in many Mexican dishes.

According to Douglas Rodriguez in "Nuevo Latino" (Ten Speed Press, 1995), "this adobo is particularly suitable for poultry, giving it a nice smoky flavor." The sweet, spicy flavor of the ancho chili makes this adobo an excellent choice for shrimp as well.

Marinate whole chicken or chicken parts, pork butt or pork shoulder for up to 3 hours; marinate shrimp (shell on or off) for 20 minutes.

From "Nuevo Latino," by Douglas Rodriguez (Ten Speed Press, 1995):

11/2 tablespoons ancho chili powder

1/2 small onion, coarsely chopped

5 cloves garlic, finely chopped

2 canned chipotle chili peppers, with seeds

1 tablespoon dried rosemary

1/2 cup fresh orange juice

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Salt and black pepper

Place the chili powder, onion, garlic, chipotle chilis, rosemary and orange juice in a blender and puree on high speed until smooth. Transfer the mixture into a bowl and whisk in the oil. Add salt and pepper to taste. May cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Per 1-teaspoon serving: 16 calories, trace protein, 1 gm carbohydrates, 2 gm fat, 0 mg cholesterol, trace saturated fat, 26 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber

Chermoula

Makes 2/3 cup

This versatile Middle Eastern sauce (sometimes known as charmoula) is claimed by Moroccan, Greek, Middle Eastern, North African and Spanish cuisines. "Chermoula is not a daily preparation," according to Copeland Marks in "The Great Book of Couscous" (Donald I. Fine, Inc., 1994). "It is, in fact, a ceremonial or festive dish."

This version of chermoula (cher-MOO-la) results in a paste that can be rubbed on lamb, fish or chicken before cooking, served alongside after the food comes off the grill or spooned into couscous or rice.

Marinate lamb chops, butterflied leg of lamb, whole chicken, chicken parts or seafood such as whole red snapper or halibut fillets 1 hour before grilling.

From "Grilling: Where There's Smoke There's Flavor," by Eric Treuille and Birgit Erath (DK, 2004):

1 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves, loosely packed

1 cup cilantro leaves, loosely packed

4 cloves garlic, crushed

1 teaspoon paprika

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon ground coriander

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

2 tablespoons olive oil

Place all of the ingredients in a food processor or blender and pulse until a paste forms. May cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Per 1-teaspoon serving: 10 calories, trace protein, trace carbohydrates, 1 gm fat, 0 mg cholesterol, trace saturated fat, 2 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber

Chimichurri

Makes about 2 cups

Chimichurri (chim-ee-CHUR-ee) is the traditional accompaniment to South American grilled meats. Like marinara, salsas and other traditional sauces, no two chimichurri recipes are exactly alike, although you can count on four basics: parsley, garlic, olive oil and salt. Some cooks add grated onion to their chimichurri, while others throw in diced red bell pepper, fresh hot chilis, cilantro, rosemary, oregano, cayenne or even carrots.

Serve sauce with grilled steaks, beef of any kind, sausage, chicken or fish.

From "Miami Spice," by Steven Raichlen (Workman, 1993):

1 bunch fresh curly parsley, stemmed and minced (about 2 cups)

8 to 10 cloves garlic, minced

1 cup olive oil

3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1 teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 teaspoon salt, or to taste

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Combine the parsley and garlic in a food processor or mortar and grind to a coarse paste. Work in the oil, lemon juice, red pepper flakes, salt and pepper. Taste and add more lemon juice or salt if needed.

May cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Per 1-teaspoon serving: 21 calories, trace protein, trace carbohydrates, 2 gm fat, 0 mg cholesterol, trace saturated fat, 25 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber

Mojo

Makes about 2 cups

Mojo (MO-ho) is a citrus-based sauce associated with many cuisines, including Cuban, Spanish, South American and Caribbean. It can be made with sour orange, lime, grapefruit or lemon juices, or a combination of them. According to Linda Bladholm in "Latin and Caribbean Grocery Stores Demystified" (Renaissance Books, 2001), it can be used as a marinade, dipping sauce, salad dressing or accompaniment to grilled or roasted meats, fried fish, cold seafood or root vegetables.

Northern California cookbook author John Ash uses mojo with asparagus, but it also could be used as a marinade for seafood, pork tenderloin or chicken breasts. "Since the citrus gives it lots of acidity, do not over-marinate meats or fish," Ash advises.

Marinate seafood for 30 minutes and meats for 1 hour before grilling, or serve sauce alongside grilled asparagus.

From "Cooking One on One," by John Ash (Clarkson Potter, 2004):

11/2 cups fresh orange juice

1/3 cup fresh lime juice

1/3 cup olive oil

1/4 cup minced fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves

2 teaspoons minced garlic

1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint leaves

1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano leaves

1 teaspoon ground ginger

2 teaspoons salt

Place all of the ingredients in a blender or food processor and pulse until a smooth mixture forms. May cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Per 1-teaspoon serving: 8 calories, trace protein, 1 gm carbohydrates, 1 gm fat, 0 mg cholesterol, trace saturated fat, 49 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber

Mole

Makes about 11/3 cups

Mole (MOH-lay) is a spicy Mexican sauce, and every traditional Mexican cook has his or her particular mix. The combination can include onion, pumpkin or sesame seeds, garlic and chilies and, often, chocolate. This rub rendition of the traditional sauce results in a spicy, peppery blend that is sweetened with confectioners' sugar and mellowed significantly by the bitter cocoa powder.

Apply this rub liberally to chicken, preferably dark meat, or thick pork chops about 1 hour before grilling.

Adapted from "Latin Flavors on the Grill," by Douglas Anderson (Ten Speed Press, 2000):

3 tablespoons peanuts, unsalted

3 star anise

1/4 cup cocoa powder

1/4 cup confectioners' sugar

1/4 cup salt

2 tablespoons sesame seeds

1 tablespoon ground black pepper

1 tablespoon crushed red pepper flakes

1 tablespoon ancho chili powder

1 tablespoon chipotle chili powder

1 teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 1/2 teaspoons ground coriander

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram

1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

1/4 teaspoon ground allspice

In an electric grinder or with a mortar and pestle, grind peanuts and star anise. Combine remainingingredients. Store at room temperature for up to several months.

Per 1-teaspoon serving: 9 calories, trace protein, 1 gm carbohydrates, 1 gm fat, 0 mg cholesterol, trace saturated fat, 468 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber

Recado

Makes about 21/2 cups

According to Reed Hearon in "La Parilla: The Mexican Grill" (Chronicle Books, 1996) recado (ray-CA-do) means "complement": "Part marinade, part spice mix, recados do indeed complement the flavors of the foods they season."

Hearon advises marinating food briefly in a recado (the salt could dry out the food if it is left to marinate too long) and liberally oiling the grill before cooking, since the ingredients in recados tend to stick to the grill.

Achiote (ah-chee-OH-tay) is the seed of the annatto (uh-NAH-toh) tree and is also known as annatto seed. The brick-colored seeds are used by many food manufacturers to color everything from baked goods to butter. They also play an important role in Mexican cuisine -- especially in this recipe where they are the starting point for a recado.

"This mild, citrus-y red spice paste can transform the blandest of foods," says Hearon, noting that it comes from the Yucatan, where it typically flavors suckling pig.

Marinate bone-in chicken breasts, chicken thighs, bone-in pork chops, butt or shoulder for 1 hour before grilling.

From "La Parilla: The Mexican Grill," by Reed Hearon (Chronicle Books, 1996):

2 tablespoons annatto seeds

1/2 cup water

1 tablespoon olive oil

3 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced

1/2 medium white onion, thickly sliced

1 teaspoon ground allspice

2 teaspoons ground black pepper

1/2 cup ancho chili powder

4 teaspoons kosher salt

1 tablespoon dried oregano

1/4 cup cider vinegar

11/2 cups fresh orange juice

1/4 cup fresh lemon juice

In a small saucepan, bring the annatto seeds and water to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat to low and simmer for 30 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to steep for 2 hours, or until softened. (Annatto seeds are a strong coloring agent, so keep spills to a minimum.)

In a small pan over medium heat, heat the oil. Add the garlic and onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes.

Drain the annatto seeds, discarding the soaking liquid. Place them in a blender or food processor along with the garlic and onion mixture and remaining ingredients and blend until smooth. May cover and refrigerate for up to 5 days.

Per 1-teaspoon serving: 5 calories, 1 gm protein, 1 gm carbohydrates, trace fat, 0 mg cholesterol, trace saturated fat, 83 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber

Romesco

Makes about 2 cups

Romesco (roh-MEHS-koh) is a sauce from Spain with many variations: Some are garlicky, some are rich with red peppers, some use hazelnuts in addition to almonds. This version relies on toasted almonds to give it a complex flavor and thick texture; the better the paprika, the better the sauce.

Serve sauce with grilled chicken, fish or asparagus.

From "The Spanish Table," by Marimar Torres (Doubleday, 1986):

1 large (1/2-inch) slice white bread

1/4 cup red-wine vinegar

1/2 cup whole almonds, blanched

1 cup coarsely chopped unpeeled ripe tomatoes

2 teaspoons Spanish paprika

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup fruity olive oil

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Place the bread and vinegar in a bowl and set aside.

On a rimmed baking sheet, toast almonds in the preheated oven for 15 minutes. Transfer the almonds to a plate to cool.

Finely grind the almonds in a food processor. Drain the bread but do not squeeze it. Discard the soaking liquid. Add the soaked bread, tomatoes, paprika and salt to the almonds and process until smooth. With the motor running, slowly add the oil until a thick sauce forms.

May cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Per 1-teaspoon serving: 17 calories, trace protein, trace carbohydrates, 2 gm fat, trace cholesterol, trace saturated fat, 14 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber

Tandoori

Makes about 2 cups

In India, tandoor is a clay oven in which meats are roasted over live coals with a special blend of spices. The blend of spices used on the meats is also known as tandoori and is combined with yogurt for a marinade, particularly appropriate for chicken. Many tandoori recipes include red or orange food coloring, which infuses the poultry or meat with its bright hue.

Marinate whole chicken, chicken thighs, bone-in or boneless chicken breasts, pork tenderloin or pork loin for up to 3 hours.

From "The Book of Sauces: Volume 2," by Anne Sheasby (HP Books, 2002):

1 red onion, cut into quarters

2 cloves garlic, peeled and coarsely chopped

1-inch piece fresh ginger root, peeled and roughly chopped

1 fresh red or green jalapeno chili pepper, cored, seeded and chopped

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 tablespoon ground coriander

1 tablespoon ground cumin

2 teaspoons garam masala*

1 teaspoon turmeric

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon olive oil

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves

1 cup plain yogurt, preferably whole-milk

Place the onion, garlic, ginger, chili and lemon juice in a food processor or blender and pulse until finely chopped. Add the coriander, cumin, garam masala, turmeric, cinnamon, oil, salt and pepper and process until a relatively smooth paste forms. Transfer the spice paste to a non-metallic bowl, add the cilantro and yogurt and mix well. May cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

*NOTE: Garam masala is an Indian spice blend available in some supermarkets and specialty stores.

Per 1-teaspoon serving: 4 calories, trace protein, trace carbohydrates, trace fat, trace cholesterol, trace saturated fat, 14 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber

Tikka

Makes about 1/2 cup

Tikka (TEE-kah), derived from the Hindu word tukra, meaning "spices," is an Indian mix often used on boneless pieces of meat. The finished dish -- the spicy meat, served on skewers -- is also called tikka. A tikka mix is similar to a tandoori mix (see preceding recipe) but is not combined with yogurt.

Skewer, then marinate, boneless pieces of chicken, pork or lamb 1 hour before grilling.

From "Curried Favors: Family Recipes From South India," by Maya Kaimal MacMillan (Abbeville Press, 1996):

1/2 cup olive oil

2 teaspoons minced garlic

1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger root

4 teaspoons ground coriander

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom

2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

11/2 to 2 teaspoons salt

Place all of the ingredients in a food processor or blender and pulse until a smooth mixture forms. May cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Per 1-teaspoon serving: 42 calories, trace protein, trace carbohydrates, 5 gm fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 1 saturated fat, 146 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber