NOT EVERYBODY NOTICES THEM, lurking at doorways, hovering over thresholds, guarding bridges. Most of us are so used to them that we walk on by. But every week since September 7, The Washington Post Magazine has presented a "Creature Feature," a photograph of a local animal statue, painting or sign. Now it's time for readers to guess where those animals came from. THE PRIZES :

First place: $1,500 Second place: $750

Third place: $250

T H E R U L E S

Pictured on the opposite page are 30 local creatures that have appeared in The Washington Post Magazine. These animals were photographed in the District of Columbia within the last year.

1. If the creature is located on a private home or business, you must record its exact street address (for example, 1234 A Street NW). If it is located on a public site that does not have an exact street address, such as a public monument or a park, you must name that place (for example, Lincoln Memorial or West Potomac Park).

2. You must write your answers on the official entry blank printed on this page or on a copy of the entry blank.

3. Employes of The Washington Post and their families are not eligible.

4. Entries are limited to one per person.

5. No telephone inquiries about the contest will be answered.

6. Entries must be received at The Washington Post by Monday, August 3, 1987, at 5 p.m. Entries should be addressed to: Creature Feature

The Washington Post Magazine

1150 15th Street NW

Washington, D.C. 20071

T H E J U D G I N G

1. Decisions of the judges are final.

2. Some creatures whose photographs have appeared as "Creature Features" may have identical or similar counterparts in other locations of the city. For example: The Magazine may have photographed a stone owl on a roof at 1234 A Street NW, but there may be another identical owl on 6789 New Jersey Avenue. In this event, the only correct answer is 1234 A Street NW. All other answers will be considered incorrect.

3. In some cases, the creature has been relocated, altered or removed since it was photographed. For example: Last October The Magazine may have photographed a marble koala bear at 1234 A Street NW, but the house may be undergoing renovation and the bear may have been temporarily put in storage. In this event, the correct answer is 1234 A Street NW. All other answers will be considered incorrect.

4. The winner will be the contestant with the most correct answers, that is, with the most correct street addresses and correct names of monuments, parks, etc.

5. In the event of a tie for first place, the entry blank with the most correct answers and the earliest date of receipt at The Magazine will be awarded first prize. For example, a contestant who gets all 30 answers right and whose entry blank arrives on July 1 will be awarded first prize over the contestant who gets all 30 answers right and whose entry blank arrives on July 15. The July 15 contestant will receive second prize. The same formula will apply to a second-place and a third-place tie, with the number of correct answers being the first determining factor and the date of receipt being the second factor. If the contestants are still tied, the prizes will be shared.

6. All awards are final. Winners will be announced in the October 11 issue of The Washington Post Magazine.

REMINDER: No telephone inquiries about the contest will be answered. This entry blank will not appear in subsequent issues of The Magazine.