THE SUBJECT IS GARDENS

I THOUGHT YOUR FEATURE ARTICLES

and photographs of local gardens in the May 6 Spring Home & Design issue were lovely, especially the photographs of the 1810 brick farmhouse.

The beauty of the photographs was spoiled for me, however, when I read "some stones are hundred-year-old grave markers." I could have wept at the cruelty of removing headstones from graves, though I know it is frequently done.

As a family genealogist, I am unable to find any of the burial places of my ancestors of the 1600s and 1700s in Maryland, and the tombstones I so desperately need are very likely being used as steppingstones in gardens. For many of us with ancestors who were neither famous nor infamous, these stones with their dates are the only way we can prove that the people existed, in spite of all the "family lore" we might have.

Many graves that appear to be forgotten are not. They are final resting places for honorable people who pioneered this country, and every grave should be respected.

The owners of the 1810 farmhouse in Georgetown, whether they caused the stones to be put there or not, should be interested enough in history (and righting a wrong) to furnish the D.C. and Maryland historical societies with data from the stones, as should all other readers who are current owners of these valuable pieces of history.

ELIZABETH Y. BURKETT

Falls Church

THANK YOU FOR MENTIONING THE national Capital Dahlia Society in the May 6 issue of the Magazine. However, there was one inaccuracy. Tubers are not sold in the fall, and never at a national show. Dahlia tubers and plants are sold in the early spring through June.

Our last plant and tuber sale of the season was held on June 14. All proceeds from the sale will go to cover costs of the National Dahlia Show, to be held September 22-23 at the new Fairview Park Marriott Hotel in Falls Church. The public is welcome at all our monthly meetings.

SUSAN M. FINCH

Editor, Dahliagram

National Capital Dahlia Society

Washington

A THOUSAND ACRES IN MIDDLEBURG?

Ancestral boxwoods in Warrenton? C'mon! What about the rest us when "Washington Moves Outdoors"?

I have an eighth of an acre in Reston but have managed to delight a few passersby. Inspired outdoor spaces exist without Lutyens benches and Adirondack chairs. There are certified wildlife habitats in back yards in Cabin John!

And my great-grandfather left his boxwoods in England.

ELLEN SWANGO

Reston

PIGEON'S BEST FRIEND

MICHAEL WELZENBACH'S WASHINGTON

pigeon story {J Street, April 22} reminded me of the compassionate New Yorker I saw in the middle of heavy traffic on Seventh Avenue near 12th Street.

He appeared to be in the middle of a ritual dance that included waving his hat like a matador. When he finally reached the safety of the sidewalk, he pointed to the pigeon at his side and explained, "That's one lucky pigeon."

LILA SNOW

Chevy Chase

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