Before John Lennon and Paul McCartney were the Beatles they were the Quarrymen, and they cut a single. And only one copy was made. One side is Lennon singing "That'll be the Day." The other is a McCartney and George Harrison ballad caled "In Spite of All the Danger." The only copy of the disc is in the hands of Duff Lowe, who played piano for the Quarrymen, and now McCartney wants to buy it, according to The Times of London. The former Beatle has offered $12,000, but Lowe is not ready to sell. Says Low, "Paul won't get it for a song . . ."

Better cash in a savings bond if you want to see the Royal Shakespeare Company's much heralded production of "Nicholas Nickleby' in New York next fall. The record-breaking price for the best seat in the house is $50. And since the play is more than eight hours long, given in two separate full length performances, it will cost you a hundred bucks to see the whole thins. The "Nickleby" ticket prices are far and away the most expensive in Broadway history. The current top price for a non-musical play is $30 for "The Little Foxes . . . "

How do you raise money to get your movie made? Well, you could rent an airplane and fly around Cannes with an advertisement announcing your picture and the name of the star, even if the star has yet to read the script (if there is one) much less sign the contract. That's what took Roger Moore by surprise at the recent festival. His name was seen flying above the Crosette advertising a remake of "Gunga Din" . . .

The acrimony from the split of the Bee Gees from the Robert Stigwood organization has spilled over into the pages of Variety. (People in show biz carry on feuds in Variety the way intellectuals carry on feuds in The New York Review of Books.) The brothers took out a full-page ad in the July 1 issue, at a cost of $1,300, to say that they "have never apologized" to Robert Stigwood or ever will, and to set forth the terms of their settlement. They also invited Freddie Gershon, president of RSO Inc. to challenge the statement, if he "wishes" . . .

Last week's Limelight column profiled a young actress appearing in "Amadeus." The actress' name is Caris Corfman, not Corsman as it was spelled in the article . . . We're forry -- uh, sorry . . .

How times change: When Bernardo Bertolucci's "Last Tango in Paris" opened in 1973 its brutal language and graphically simulated sex caused a furor and set a new standard of what was allowable in a general release films. This week the film after some re-cutting was given an R-Rating . . .