Local Kudos Note: Marjorie Phillips and her son and daughter-in-law, Laughlin and Jennifer, will be presented with the 20th annual Swan Award June 12 in Nashville, Tenn., in recognition of their contribution to the arts through the Phillips Collection. The award is presented by the Tennessee Botanical Gardens and Fine Arts Center at Cheekwood, or plain ol' Cheekwood, as it is called down in Nashville . . . Gita Kurasik of Washington is one of six pianists chosen to take part in the Xerox Pianists Program. The program provides each pianist with the opportunity to spend two weeks in residence with an orchestra. Among the orchestras involved are the Detroit Symphony, the St. Louis Symphony and the Rochester Philharmonic . . . Miles to Go Before He Sleeps Note: The great jazz-trumpeter, Miles Davis, has been in ill health for some time, but his reception on his European tour, his first in 10 years, should raise his spirit. Tickets for his Paris concert were being scalped for $80 apiece . . . Silver Century Note: "On Golden Pond," for which Katharine Hepburn and Henry Fonda won Oscars, has just gone over the $100-million mark at the box office. Screenwriter Ernest Thompson also won an Oscar for the film . . . Art and Commerce Note: To real cine'astes, the ones who crane their necks trying to read the credits at the end of the film, the name of the cinematographer is as important as the name of the director. One of the best cinematographers in the business is Vilmos Zsigmond, among whose many credits is "Close Encounters of the Third Kind." Zsigmond's work will soon be seen on TV, but you will have to look fast. It's a 30-second commercial for Coca-Cola . . . Nothing Is Free Forever Note: Baltimore's Walters Art Gallery may become the second museum in the city to charge admission, pending the outcome of a museum board meeting Tuesday. The money raised would be used to help pay competitive salaries to its guards and maintenance workers. Robert Bergman, the museum's director, said he was "optimistic" that the city Board of Estimate would approve a request for additional money. City budget director George Piendak had said the board would find it a "lot easier" to approve the request if the museum began charging admission . . .