Little Tramp Note: Kevin Brownlow and David Gill, the British film historians who restored Abel Gance's "Napoleon," have unearthed a Charles Chaplin short film called "How to Make Movies." The pair edited it from Chaplin's instructions. The film will be premiered at the London Film Festival in November . . .

The Director and the Playwright Won't Have Any Arguments Note: Arthur Miller has written two, new one-act plays for two characters, "Elegy for a Lady" and "Some Kind of Love Story," and will be directing them at the Long Wharf Theater in New Haven this fall. A spokesman for the theater described the plays as continuing in the experimental vein Miller was exploring in "The American Clock," which had a disastrous excursion on Broadway two seasons back. Charles Cioffi, recently seen as the hard-ball-playing State Department representative in "Missing," is in the cast . . .

Serious Item for Trivial People or Trivial Item for Serious People Note: The London theater season is just under way and of immediate interest is a National Theatre revival of Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest." Most of the critical praise has been heaped on Judi Dench, whose name is something less of a household word here but who is arguably among the greatest actresses of her time. Her portrayal of the imposing Lady Bracknell caused The Observer critic, Robert Cushman, to gush: "This is probably the best acted Lady Bracknell there has ever been." The critic covers himself by saying the late Edith Evans' performance was a "happening" . . .

One More London Theatre Note: As further evidence of how closely related American and English professional theater are (only the respective Actor's Equities seem unable to fathom this) the Times of London reports that Trevor Nunn has told close friends he will quit his post as director of the Royal Shakespeare Company. Nunn is the man who brought "Nicholas Nickleby" to the stage and is currently in New York preparing the much-awaited "Cats." He told acquaintances, according to the Times, that he prefers to freelance as a director. No doubt. Considering the kinds of opportunities available in New York to the man who directs a Tony-award winning play . . .