* Lead Indicator Note: One hopes the fellows in Foggy Bottom and at Langley in charge of looking for information on the state of the world read Variety last week. On the front page was this comforting news: "Beirut Cinemas Turn Corner as Biz Normalizes." It was quite a sharp corner since the principal movie palaces were in the no-man's land between East and West Beirut and were all destroyed . . .

* Man For All Seasons Note: He's a physician. He's a writer. He's a performer. He's a composer. He's a director for television and the stage. He's Jonathan Miller. Next spring he will be making his first foray into American regional theater since the 1960s. At the American Repertory Theater in Cambridge, Mass., he will stage Richard Brinsley Sheridan's "The School for Scandal" . . .

* Time Marches On Note: When Alan Bates and Julie Christie were young and free they were directed by John Schlesinger in "Far From the Madding Crowd." Now the three will be working together again, this time on a production for HBO of Terence Rattigan's "Separate Tables," a story of lonely middle-aged people coming together. The supporting cast -- if that is the way to describe them -- includes Claire Bloom and Irene Worth . . .

* Ghost Sonata Note: Through the miracles of modern technology those departed are not always completely gone. For example, on Yoko Ono's new album, "It's Alright," her late husband John Lennon can be heard playing guitar and on one cut calling his wife's name, "Yoko." The single from the album, with "My Man" and "Let the Tears Dry," is being distributed this week . . .

* Same Story, New Style Note: The problem of rock groups getting away from the stage through police, adoring fans and crazed groupies was immortalized by Richard Lester and the Beatles in "A Hard Day's Night." Now that problem is being shown in a more contemporary fashion. The rock group Journey is being featured in a home video game, which has the premise that the player is a member of the band with eight minutes to get from the stage to his limousine while trying to avoid autograph hounds, managers, promoters and other banes of the rock-star life. Of course, as he negotiates this perilous course Journey's music plays on the sound-effect track . . . The cartridge will be available starting in January . . .