*What's Love Got to Do With It? Beach Boy Mike Love gave the Parents Music Resource Center $5,000 seed money for the campaign against rock "leerics."

*Operator, Get Me Central: Bruce Springsteen fans trying to place phone orders for tickets to his Aug. 5 show at RFK Stadium tied up phone service in the mid-Atlantic region for almost four hours. Almost 2 million calls were made for what eventually turned out to be fewer than 3,000 tickets. The other 50,000 were sold in less than two hours -- through regular ticket services.

*Wham!, Bam, Thank You Uncle Sam: Wham!, Britain's poster popsters, had two of the top three singles in Billboard's year-end wrap-up. The only ones to achieve that feat before: Elvis Presley in 1956 and the Beatles in 1964. Wham! also went to China, the first rock group to scale the Great Wall: The group lost $1 million, canned the film shot during the tour and closed the gates, at least for a while, when the government claimed Chinese youth attending Wham! concerts had gotten too excited for their own good.

*There's Gold in Them There Vaults: Two of the best records of the year came from dead artists (Sam Cooke and Hank Williams, represented in newly discovered nightclub and demo recordings, respectively). And CBS legitimized the Bob Dylan bootleg industry by releasing almost two dozen cuts previously available only on the sly.

*The Day the Music Lived: On July 13 Live Aid concerts rocked both London and Philadelphia, and thanks to television, 150 countries. One-and-a-half billion people watched for free; some gave money to fight hunger in Africa.

*Man of the Year: Irascible Bob Geldof was delightfully rude when everybody was looking to kowtow to him. Geldof never lost sight of the goal. Here's hoping Santa Claus brought him a recording contract for next year.

*Snooze Alert! MTV unveiled Video Hits 1, its adult video network. Besides the absolute worst veejays in the history of cable television (and that's saying something), VH-1 came across like the video version of the radio that gets five stations at the same time.

*If You Love Somebody, Set Them Free: With the exception of select superstars, radio and record companies seem to be pursuing a policy of equality but separateness in regards to black artists -- which may be why everybody who got on the charity bandwagon seemed out to lunch when "Sun City," a protest record that hits closer to home than Americans would like to admit, had great difficulty getting air play, even in major cities like Washington and Los Angeles.

*Knuckle-Under-Heads: Everybody connected with "Porn Wars" qualifies. The worst offenders: The National Association of Broadcasters, which tried to point the finger at anyone but itself; and the Recording Industry Association of America, which managed to hem, haw and harrumph its way through a congressional hearing and then offered a cosmetic compromise with so many escape clauses you'd think Houdini had written it.

*Not Fad Away: After Live-Aid, pop philanthropy seemed to be burning out in terms of specific causes, but the aftereffects bear watching, particularly in the manner in which artists address their music and their newly established populist position to effect changes in the world.