CLASSICAL MUSIC

Violinist Jennifer Gordon -- concertmaster of the Northern Virginia Youth Symphony and by all accounts one of the most promising young musicians in Washington -- will give a recital today as part of the Phillips Collection's festival of Washington performers. She has been described as "already a professional," "at the virtuoso level" and "on her way to international recognition." Those who want good seats for the free concert are advised to arrive early.

Music of black classical composers will be featured in a lecture and concert this afternoon in the Smithsonian's Hall of Musical Instruments, beginning at 1 with the premiere of a work for cello and piano by Frederick Tillis: "Spiritual Fantasy No. 7: 'On My Journey Now.' " Other composers represented will include Hale Smith, David Baker, William Grant Still, William L. Dawson, Adolphus Hailstork and Undine Smith Moore.

Concertmaster William Steck will be the soloist in the Brahms Violin Concerto in this week's National Symphony Orchestra program. Also on the program, conducted by Mstislav Rostropovich: Copland's Third Symphony.

Chamber music of "The Great Russian Romantics" will be presented Thursday in the free "Music at Noon" series at Western Presbyterian Church.

Also worth noting: Mozart's Requiem, this evening at St. Thomas More Cathedral in Arlington; baritone Charles Williams as soloist with the Mount Vernon Chamber Orchestra, this evening at St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Alexandria.

DANCE

The Stuttgart Ballet -- one of Europe's leading ballet troupes and the world's major repository for the works of choreographer John Cranko -- returns to the Kennedy Center Opera House for the first time in seven years for a two-week run starting Tuesday evening. Cranko's "Eugene Onegin" opens the engagement; John Neumeier's two-act "A Streetcar Named Desire" follows; at the start of the second week, a repertory bill of ballets by Fokine, Bejart and Azari Plissetzki will also make its bow. Principal dancers include artistic director Marcia Haydee, and Richard Cragun, Birgit Keil, Susanne Hanke and Vladimir Klos.

A "Ballet Showcase" featuring Linda Kintz and Mark Mejia, dancers of the Kintz-Mejia Ballet Company, and guest artists Ingrid Fraley and Tomas Rahal, will take place at the Montgomery College Performing Arts Center Friday evening. The program will include premieres of two works by Mejia.

New Moves -- the team of dancer-choreographers Tish Carter and Nancy Galeota -- will wind up Mount Vernon College's "Spring Moves" festival Friday and Saturday evenings with a program featuring four premieres. Carter and Galeota will be joined by guest dancers Anne McDonald and Mary Buckley, along with singer Connie McKenna. The performances will take place in the college's Hand Chapel.

FILM

As part of its celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Director's Guild, the American Film Institute kicks off its tribute to Joseph Mankiewicz with the George Stevens film "Woman of the Year," which Mankiewicz produced.

Tuesday, the Smithsonian Resident Associates' tribute to three great Hollywood actresses concludes with a discussion of Sally Field, led by Prof. Richard Brown. Call for details.

Wednesday at 7:30, the American Satire series continues at the Library of Congress' Mary Pickford Theater with John Cassavetes' "Husbands," starring Cassavetes, Ben Gazzara and Peter Falk. Friday, the Real-Life America series continues with Albert Maysles' documentary "Salesman."

Tonight and Monday at the Biograph, Jim Jarmusch's masterful postmodernist comedy, "Stranger Than Paradise," in a double bill with Jonathan Demme's "Stop Making Sense."

Today and tomorrow at the Circle, George Stevens Jr.'s loving documentary tribute to his father, "George Stevens: A Filmmaker's Journey," in a double bill with the elder Stevens' "The More the Merrier." Tuesday and Wednesday, more Stevens: "Giant," the Texas epic starring James Dean and Elizabeth Taylor, in a double bill with "Shane," featuring what may be the greatest bar fight ever staged.

POP MUSIC

Today, you can kick off your shoes and dance a jig at Glen Echo, as a dozen Irish and Celtic bands from Washington and Baltimore kick off the annual Irish Folk Festival. Then rest up during the week, because on Saturday and Sunday, things get local and international with the 10th annual Washington Folk Festival, bringing together hundreds of Washingtonians from a wide variety of cultures and musical styles. Both these events are free and educational in the most enjoyable way.

Canadian singer-songwriter Jane Siberry, who's been compared to Laurie Anderson and Suzanne Vega, impressed the crowd at the 9:30 club in her local debut six months ago; now, with an intriguing new album just out, she comes to Georgetown University's Gaston Hall on Tuesday.

Two of the finest American independent rock bands come to the 9:30 club: Arizona's Meat Puppets expand on their visceral cow-punk exhortations on Wednesday, while North Carolina's Dumptruck come in on the heels of "Positively Dumptruck," one of the most vibrant albums of 1986.

Joe Henderson, whose funky, driving tenor saxophone playing incorporates elements of free playing into a be-bop outlook, is at the One Step Down Friday and Saturday.

THEATER

Harold Pinter's "Old Times" (at Arena's Kreeger Theater) takes a strangely mesmerizing walk down memory lane, as a middle-age husband, his wife and the wife's best friend recall their conflicting versions of the past. What's really going on is a raging battle for control of the present -- with the wife going to the victor. Sexual entanglements are also the subject of "Christmas on Mars" and "N.Y. Mets," two entertainingly offbeat comedies (playing in repertory at the Woolly Mammoth Theatre). The big musical in town is still "Dreamgirls" (at the National). CAPTION: Picture 1, The Meat Puppets come to the 9:30 club Wednesday. featuring what may be the greatest bar fight ever staged.

POP MUSIC Today, you can kick off your shoes and dance a jig at Glen Echo, as a dozen Irish and Celtic bands from Washington and Baltimore kick off the annual Irish Folk Festival. Then rest up during the week, because on Saturday and Sunday, things get local and international with the 10th annual Washington Folk Festival, bringing together hundreds of Washingtonians from a wide variety of cultures and musical styles. Both these events are free and educational in the most enjoyable way.

Canadian singer-songwriter Jane Siberry, who's been compared to Laurie Anderson and Suzanne Vega, impressed the crowd at the 9:30 club in her local debut six months ago; now, with an intriguing new album just out, she comes to Georgetown University's Gaston Hall on Tuesday.

Two of the finest American independent rock bands come to the 9:30 club: Arizona's Meat Puppets expand on their visceral cow-punk exhortations on Wednesday, while North Carolina's Dumptruck come in on the heels of "Positively Dumptruck," one of the most vibrant albums of 1986.

Joe Henderson, whose funky, driving tenor saxophone playing incorporates elements of free playing into a be-bop outlook, is at the One Step Down Friday and Saturday.

THEATER Harold Pinter's "Old Times" (at Arena's Kreeger Theater) takes a strangely mesmerizing walk down memory lane, as a middle-age husband, his wife and the wife's best friend recall their conflicting versions of the past. What's really going on is a raging battle for control of the present -- with the wife going to the victor. Sexual entanglements are also the subject of "Christmas on Mars" and "N.Y. Mets," two entertainingly offbeat comedies (playing in repertory at the Woolly Mammoth Theatre). The big musical in town is still "Dreamgirls" (at the National).Picture 1, The Meat Puppets come to the 9:30 club Wednesday.