POP MUSIC

THE SILKY-SMOOTH SINGER paired with a chanting deejay is a tried-and-true formula in reggae dance hall, and right about now the hottest smooth/rough duo is Tanto Metro and Devonte,

whose "Everyone Falls in Love" is the reggae crossover jam of the summer. Deejay Tanto Metro borrows from both the Spice Girls and dance-hall hitmaker Beenie Man, while Devonte's soaring contributions are nothing short of sublime. "Everyone Falls in Love" is booming on jeeps and reggae sound systems from the D.C. suburbs to downtown Kingston; hear it live on Wednesday, when the duo performs along with Beenie Man.

--Alona Wartofsky

Wednesday at 11:30 p.m. at D.C. Live, 932 F St. NW. $20. 202-347-7200.

ART

THE EVOLUTION OF ABSTRACT ARTIST JUDITH ROTHSCHILD (1921-93) can be traced at a current retrospective of her work, "Judith Rothschild: An Artist's Search," at the Phillips Collection. Influenced by Picasso and Miro early on, she later admired Matisse, whose cutout style she evokes in her vibrant large-scale works "Death of Patroklos" and "The Gothic XI" (now in the National Gallery's collection). Her surroundings often inspired her work; included in the show is "Lieutenant Island," a stark landscape created near her Wellfleet studio in 1966.

--Nicole Lewis

At the Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. On weekdays there is a suggested contribution of $6.50; weekend admission is $6.50. Through next Sunday. 202-387-2151.

FILM

SCIENCE FICTION MEETS SCIENCE FACT in the Smithsonian Associates' wholly infectious Thursday series "Invisible Invaders on Film and TV." This week, John Henderson, a bio-weapons expert, will show clips from such septic fare as "The Omega Man" and "The Andromeda Strain," then discuss the real-life viability of these fictional scenarios. The series continues a week from Thursday with an examination of the teeny-weeny terrors of TV's "X-Files." Flu shots to follow.

--Rita Kempley

At the S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW., Room 3035. Thursday at 6 p.m. $16. 202-357-3030.

CLASSICAL

UNDER THE BATONS OF ANTHONY AIBEL, Leslie B. Dunner and Takao Kanayama, the National Symphony Orchestra will present three free performances this week at the Carter Barron Amphitheatre. Thursday's family concert features music from around the world, including works by Tchaikovsky and Bizet. Friday's concert highlights music inspired by Spain, opening with Gershwin's "Cuban Overture" and closing with Rimsky-Korsakov's "Capriccio Espagnol." Works by Brahms and Beethoven will appear on Saturday's bill.

--Nicole Lewis

At the Carter Barron Amphitheatre, 16th Street and Colorado Avenue NW. Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m. Free; no tickets required. 202-467-4600.