POP MUSIC

IT'S HARD TO BELIEVE, BUT THIS IS THE 25TH ANNIVERSARY OF SQUEEZE, the Brit-pop rock group built around the songwriting team of Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford. The band's history is peppered with potholes--awkward label switches, disbanding at the height of success--but it continues to record and tour sporadically. As its upcoming anniversary celebration will show, catchy pop tunes like "Tempted," "Cool for Cats," "Black Coffee in Bed" and "Pulling Mussels (From the Shell)" warrant comparisons to Lennon-McCartney craftsmanship.

--Richard Harrington

At Nation, 1015 Half St. SE. Sunday, 8 p.m., with Julia Darling and Nick Harper. $20. For tickets, call 800-551-SEAT. For information, call 202-554-1500.

ART

ALTHOUGH IMPRESSIONISM germinated in France in the 1860s, it wasn't until the turn of the century that American painters embraced the idea of loose brush strokes and the use of changing light in their works. Childe Hassam, Joseph DeCamp and John Twachtman were among the first to catch on. They became part of the Ten, a loosely knit group of American impressionists who exhibited together for 20 years, their final show taking place at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in 1919. Works of these three artists, as well as a handful of others, are currently on display in "American Impressionism: Selections From the Corcoran Gallery of Art," at Strathmore Hall. All 23 paintings are from the Corcoran's permanent collection.

--Nicole Lewis

At Strathmore Hall, 10701 Rockville Pike, North Bethesda. Until Nov. 8. Free. 301-530-0540.

CLASSICAL MUSIC

SOPRANO DAWN UPSHAW doesn't have a huge voice, she doesn't have an overwhelming, outsize personality on the operatic stage, and her cult is composed mainly of the quieter sort of vocal fan. But she is an incomparable singer of extraordinary directness and expressivity. Her singing in a vocal recital has the effect of a single bright light in a darkened room: It focuses, clarifies and eliminates the unnecessary. On one of the busiest concert nights of the season, Upshaw will give a vocal recital just outside of town. A very solid bet.

--Philip Kennicott

At George Mason University Center for the Arts, Braddock Road and Route 123, Fairfax. Friday at 8 p.m. $30-$40. 703-993-8888.

DANCE

TAIWAN'S CLOUD GATE DANCE THEATRE got its start in the imagination of a child--Artistic Director Lin Hwai-min had seen the film "The Red Shoes" as a boy and dreamed of a dancing life. The only way to make that real was to found his own company, which he did in 1973, forming the first modern dance company in a Chinese- speaking land. The troupe, last here four years ago, fuses American modern dance traditions with Asian movement styles drawn from theater and martial arts. The 90-minute "Songs of the Wanderers" explores Asian religious practices.

--Sarah Kaufman

At George Mason University Center for the Arts, Braddock Road and Route 123, Fairfax. Saturday at 8 p.m. $25-$35. 703-218-6500.

FILM

LIKE CARS, CAMERAS AND DISC PLAYERS, another thing the Japanese seem to make so well is animated films. They know some things that the people at Disney have never figured out. That brilliance is on display through Nov. 21 in the 17-film series "Masters of Anime" at the Freer Gallery of Art, and it can't help but advance the fortunes of one of the few big Japanese animated features to get a wide U.S. release, "Princess Mononoke," which opens Nov. 5. Next Saturday at 2 p.m., the Freer will show "Black Jack," which is about a rogue surgeon (!) who uncovers an international scheme to invent a superhuman species.

--Stephen Hunter

All films will be screened at the Freer Gallery's Meyer Auditorium, Jefferson Drive at 12th Street SW. Free. For a complete schedule, call 202-357-2700 (voice); 202-357-1729 (TTY).

THEATER

THE DISCOVERY THEATRE will present "Haunted Washington," an "original play for families with children," next Saturday. The play is based on legends of the area, including the ghost of an actor who was supposedly murdered at the National Theatre and buried beneath the orchestra pit.

--Lloyd Rose

At the Discovery Theatre in the Smithsonian Institute's Arts and Industries Building, 900 Jefferson Dr. SW. Saturday at 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. $10. 202-357-1500.