Sean "Puffy" Combs didn't find too many fans at New York's Apollo Theatre last week when he attended a performance by heavy metal band Korn. After the rockers left the stage, some audience members who spotted Combs started chanting, "Puffy sucks!" A witness reported that Combs waved to the crowd at first--but once he made out what they were saying, took his leave. . . .

The Brooklyn Academy of Music's Next Wave Festival is presenting "Party at the End of Time: '1999' Live," in which The Roots, Vernon Reid and other artists will perform the classic 1982 album "1999" by The Artist who was then known as Prince. Additional performers include N'Dea Davenport, Corey Glover, Coati Mundi, Angelique Kidjo, PM Dawn and Black Thought. Performances are Dec. 11 and 12. For information call 718-636-4100. . . .

A New Orleans rapper who performs in a bumblebee suit and calls himself Bum Beazy was arrested and charged last week with a series of robberies he allegedly undertook to raise money to record an album. James Lane, 20, who was captured after allegedly holding up a grocery store, admitted to robbing nine businesses in the New Orleans area, police said. . . .

Internet music sales are expected to top $5.2 billion in 2005, fueled by sales from record labels and the ease of ordering CDs and downloading tunes over the Internet, according to a new study. Online music sales hit $170 million last year, according to the study from research outfit Music Business International. The study said Internet sales will represent one-tenth of the total $46 billion music market in 2005, with downloaded music pegged to be worth $635 million alone. Artists such as David Bowie, George Michael and Public Enemy have already endorsed the use of MP3 technologies to provide downloadable music to consumers. An estimated 3 million CD-quality tracks are already downloaded each day, most of them for free; in response, music companies have teamed up to figure out how best to protect their copyrights and royalties. So far, record labels have made only tentative forays into selling music online. "It's turned the industry upside down," said Simon Dyson, a music market analyst at Market Tracking International, which produced the report for MBI. "Piracy is ahead of the industry instead of the other way around."