This week's scant selection of recent theatrical releases is pleasantly offset by some solid vintage films such as "Journey to the Center of the Earth" and Orson Welles' "The Lady From Shanghai."

THE FLAMINGO KID (Vestron, 1985)

Matt Dillon garnered good reviews as a rebellious 18 year-old cabana boy in his last summer before college. With Richard Crenna, Jessica Walter and Hector Elizondo.

JOHNNY DANGEROUSLY (CBS/Fox, 1984)

Strained gangster spoof about the rise of a young man (Michael Keaton) to the top (or is it bottom?) of the underworld to support his ailing mother. With Joe Piscopo and Marilu Henner.

NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (Media, 1985)

Gory but fairly intelligent chiller about a teen-aged girl menaced by a killer out of her dreams. Wes Craven directs; Heather Langenkamp, John Saxon and Ronee Blakely star.

MICKI AND MAUDE (RCA/Columbia, 1984)

Likeable bigamist Dudley Moore's carefully balanced love life becomes a comic nightmare when both wives (Ann Reinking and Amy Irving) deliver babies in adjoining rooms. Written and directed by Blake Edwards.

JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF THE EARTH (Playhouse, 1959)

An absent-minded professor (James Mason) leads an expedition from Victorian Scotland into a fantastic prehistoric world. Jules Verne's classic science-fiction story, wonderfully realized by a pre-"Star Wars" 20th Century Fox. With Pat Boone, Arlene Dahl and as many thrills as "Raiders of the Lost Ark."

THE VIKINGS (MGM/UA, 1958)

Lush, atmospheric spectacle starring Kirk Douglas and Tony Curtis as Norsemen battling over Janet Leigh and against an evil tyrant. With a spellbinding score by Mario Nascimbene.

THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY (MGM/UA, 1945)

Oscar Wilde's allegory about a young hedonist who sells his soul so that only his portrait ages and reflects his true wickedness. A fascinating, somber movie starring Hurd Hatfield, Angela Lansbury and the incomparable George Sanders.

THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI (RCA/Columbia, 1948)

A sailor hired to look after a millionaire's yacht and wife falls into a web of intrigue, lust and murder. Orson Welles directed and starred with wife Rita Hayworth. Their confrontation scene in a hall of mirrors is one of the most studied in film history.