Tourney Time! The men's NCAA Basketball Tournament begins, in a week that also includes the ACC championship game, and the start of the NIT men's and NCAA women's tourneys. Meanwhile, the Sci Fi Channel rolls out Frank Herbert's Children of Dune with a cast that features Susan Sarandon. PBS takes a detailed look at Domestic Violence in America. And HBO does the unorthodox, presenting Normal, a film centered on gender-switching and starring Tom Wilkinson and Jessica Lange.

MAFIA DOCTOR

Sunday at 9 on CBS

Danny Nucci, perhaps best remembered for a featured role in "Titanic," plays a young man from New Jersey who is impressed with the Mafia lifestyle he sees around him. The harsh reality of that life strikes home when his father finds himself the target of a hit. Nucci's character makes a Faustian bargain, of sorts, that spares his father's life and leads to his becoming a doctor indentured to the mob. The entanglement leads to a number of difficult personal and professional choices.

Paul Sorvino stars as the mob boss controlling the doctor's destiny. Olympia Dukakis plays his wife. The storyline is said to have been inspired by actual events.

BOOMTOWN

Sunday at 10 on NBC

The show that has been embraced by a number of critics but not that widely by viewers continues its early spring run with an episode titled "Storm Watch." Donnie Wahlberg, as Detective Stevens, finds himself involved in an internal investigation after two officers are gunned down while responding to a call, the apparent result of a tip from inside the precinct. The FBI locks down the station while Stevens helps sort out the suspects. One who looks good as the possible mole is Jason Gedrick's character, officer Turcotte. A possible, and unlikely, ally in the probe is Nina Garbiras, who plays news reporter Andrea.

AMERICAN MASTERS: ALICE WATERS

Wednesday at 8 on PBS

This installment of the PBS series tells the story of Alice Waters, who rocked the international world of food in the late 1970s by preparing a simple lunch--roasted garlic, grilled spring lamb, a salad of baby mixed greens and a perfect peach--for an elite culinary gathering. Henri Charvet, the famous French chef, sniffed, "Zhat is not cooking. Zhat is shopping!" Despite his opinion, Waters had created a "delicious revolution."

She and her now-famous restaurant, Chez Panisse in Berkeley, Calif., became a major force behind the way Americans eat and think about food, launching the explosion of local farmers' markets and redesigned supermarket produce departments. Her basic approach to meals revolves around naturally grown food prepared in basic fashions.

This film follows Waters through a year of seasonal shopping and cooking, each ending with a glorious meal--and shares with viewers both the recipes and vision of an artist and activist.

ON THE SPOT

Thursday at 9:30 on WB

Comic Tim Conway hosts this partially scripted, partially improvised half-hour comedy series that relies on the participation of the audience and the quick wit of cast members to move a story along. Each episode takes place at the Sun Spot Hotel, a kitschy Malibu hotel with quirky employees and guests.

It will be paired with "JKX: The Jamie Kennedy Experiment," which is moving back to the 9 p.m. Thursday time slot.

SEARCH FOR THE MOST TALENTED KID IN AMERICA

Friday at 8 on NBC

This talent-hunt program features youngsters from across the country competing head-to-head. Each week, candidates will be scored by a panel of celebrity judges who will pick one winner from each age category (3-7, 8-12 and 13-15), producing three finalists at the end of each show. These winners will then advance to the finals in Los Angeles to compete for a cash prize.

ED

Friday at 9 on NBC

This series moves into a new time slot for its final three episodes of the season, starting tonight. Now in its third season, the comic drama is produced by the same folks responsible for the "Late Show With David Letterman." The network hopes for a boost in viewership by moving the show from Wednesday and airing it an hour later.