As August winds down, new shows are cropping up. Fox offers "The Complex" and NBC spotlights "Hawaii." Jane Pauley returns to the air with a new syndicated talk show. MTV presents its 21st annual music video awards. The Republican Convention begins on Monday. A&E looks at the life of a bounty hunter, while Dave Chappelle shows up on a Showtime special. On CBS, it's time for the Latin Grammys. Heather Graham suits up to join the cast of "Scrubs." And say hello to "Father of the Pride."

Mystery! Inspector Morse Iv:

The INfernal Serpent

Sunday at 9 p.m. on PBS

By the time cranky inspector Morse -- who, like fellow fictional sleuths Columbo and Spenser, acknowledges no first name -- wrapped up his final case in 2001, the saga had become the longest-running detective series on "Mystery!" After 13 years and 64 programs, Morse had done it all.

The rebroadcast of one of his earlier cases is worth watching, as John Thaw portrays the crotchety gent created by author Colin Dexter. Morse's methods are not steeped in DNA analysis, and he is not known for his social graces, but he gets the job done with resolve if not razzle-dazzle.

The jane pauley show

Weekdays at 10 a.m. on WJLA

Pauley, who left her anchor slot on NBC's "Dateline" just over a year ago, returns to television in this daily syndicated one-hour talk show.

Pauley said her show "is going to be fun, but can be serious, with topics that pique or tweak your imagination. We might talk to someone who has led a life of challenge but far beyond what we can imagine."

She likens the program to those of Oprah and Dr. Phil, aimed at presenting issues important to adult women.

"This will not be a news show but I think everybody responds to what people are thinking about," she said. "You watch Dr. Phil or Oprah if the topic interests you. And you'll like my show too."

Pauley is no stranger to daytime television: she began her network career as co-host, with Tom Brokaw, of "The Today Show" in the 1970s.

REPUBLICAN CONVENTION

Monday through Thursday

The Grand Old Party brings its political spotlight to the Big Apple. Madison Square Garden is the venue, and the networks and cable channels will carry highlights of the gathering, culminating in President Bush's speech on Thursday.

Scheduled coverage includes:

ABC: 10 to 11 p.m. live broadcast on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

NBC: 10 to 11 p.m. live broadcast on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Additional NBC coverage will air on MSNBC.

CBS: 10 to 11 p.m. live broadcast on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

PBS will carry three-hour live blocks each evening, beginning at 8 on Monday.

the complex: malibu

Monday at 8 p.m. on Fox

Take the home makeover reality show craze, add a competitive edge, toss in the couple factor and oh yes, remember to offer a nice cash prize.

Those are the elements of this new reality show, set in a cliffside apartment building in sunny Southern California.

Eight real-life couples, operating with unbudgeable budgets and tight deadlines, will compete for the chance to restore and redecorate one of four units. They will battle each other for control of the units while trying to increase the value of each of the rooms.

The fate of the wannabe renovators will be determined by a panel of experts -- including an interior designer, a real estate agent and an architect -- who will rank the rooms and decide who stays and who goes.

After the two-hour premiere, the show will air on Mondays at 9 starting Sept. 6.

LATIN GRAMMY AWARDS

Wednesday at 8 p.m. on CBS

With 43 categories, including two new ones, this award show's fifth annual airing will be carried live from Los Angeles.

Nominees Bebo Valdes, Diego El Cigala, Paulina Rubio and Roselyn Sanchez are scheduled to perform.

Presenters include Black Eyed Peas, Gael Garcia Bernal, Cheech Marin, Maria Menounos and Freddy Rodriguez.

The new categories are best singer-songwriter album and best Christian album (Portuguese language).

HAWAII

Wednesday at 8 p.m. on NBC

Long ago, in another century, Jack Lord's character chased crime in prime time on the Hawaiian isle.

Fast-forward to 2004 as the Honolulu metro police department is spotlighted for a new generation.

Michael Biehn plays the police force's storied detective, Sean Harrison. He teams with a newcomer to Hawaii, John Declan, played by Sharif Atkins.

But while Declan may be a savvy cop fresh from the Windy City, he's literally a fish out of water here -- because he cannot swim.

The two set about solving local crimes, using skills and knowledge particular to Hawaii.

The series is shot on location in Oahu.