In last week's Weekly guide to nursing homes and long-term care facilitities in the metropolitan area, the listing for Oak Meadow Nursing Home in Alexandria should have said: "A waiting list is not kept but vacancies are filled by those who call when there is a vacancy."

A nursing home.

To move a friend or relative, or even onself, into a nusing home or long-term care facility is not an easy thing to do. The decision is full of emotion and confusion, and once it is made then the search for a home begins. Nursing homes vary widely in facilities, in services and in costs. Finding one that meets your needs and budget can be a drawn-out process.

Nursing home beds in Northern Virginia are in short supply and waiting lists are long, especially for those who must depend on Medicaid. For those who can pay their own way, the $30 a day average cost for nursing home care can rapidly wipe out any savings or other assets accumulated over a lifetime.

A guide to nursing and other longterm care homes in the metropolitan area has been complied by the Virginia Weekly. Included in this guide are key facts about costs, services and the availability of beds and a list of licensed nursing homes in the area.

With improved licensing standards throughout the metropolitan area and with high federal standards for homes taking Medicaid or Medicare patients, more nursing homes have upgraded their care and the safety of their environment. Some homes have better staff than others; some provide more pleasant surroundings than others.

The only way to evaluate and eventually choose a nursing home is to visit the home - prederably twice - once by appointment with the administrator who can give you a tour and explain the facility and its services; the other, an impromptu visit at meal or leisure time, These are good times to observe morale in the home, the rapport between staff and patients and the cleanliness of the facility.

Samuel Roberts, administrator of the Hebrew Home of Greater Washington, suggests visitors look at the public areas. "Is there room for recreation? Does the home look like a home and not a hospital? Are the patients' nails clean, hair combed, are they wearing their own clothing? These are the things you look for".

This guide will help you learn what to look for and how to look for it, but it is not intended to rate the nursing homes.

While there are alternatives to nursing home care, in many cases the physical or mental disabilities of an aged person are such that nursing home care becomes necessary. A physician can generally help decide when nursing home care is needed and at what level, but from then on you will be pretty much on your own in finding the right home.

Three agencies offer help in this search. They are: Alexandria, adult services division of the Alexandria department of social services (549-7888); Arlington, intake services, Arlington County department of human resources (558-2892); and Fairfax, Fairfax County department of social services (938-5300).

Few beds are readily available in the Northern Virginia area. Persons who can pay their own way will wait anywhere from a few days to a few months for a nursing home bed. With the exception of Alexandria patients, those dependent on Medicaid may wait six months or longer.

According to Ruth Nicholls, supervisor of social services in Alexandria, there were 55 Medicaid placements since January, 1976, and the average wait was two weeks. "The fact that we are smaller than Arlington or Fairfax might have something to do with it", she said.

"It's continual crisis," reported Susan Interranpe, nursing home finder with the Arlington County department of human resources. "A lot of people are at home who should be in nursing homes. We had one family looking for a bed April and we still hadn't found one for them in October. Financing a stay in a nursing home isn't as difficult as finding a bed."

"Many residents - and especially Medicaid patients - have had to leave the area for nursing home care," said Marky McDowell, a health planner with the Northern Virginia health planning commission. "We are sending our people to nursing homes in Maryland and in southwest and central Virginia."

This creates a difficult situation for nursing home residents and their families because regular visits to the home and excursions out of the home often affect morale and the success of the transfer of an elderly person from private to institutional life.

Of the 10,410 long term care beds in the metropolitan area, 2,379 are located in 19 facilities in Northern Virginia. Health planners in suburban Maryland, Northern Virginia and the District have approved construction of 1,577 more beds, 293 slated for Northern Virginia. These additional beds are scheduled for completion within the next three years. But even with the additional beds, there is considerable doubt nursing home needs will be met.

"We have about 34 nursing home beds per 1,000 elderly residents", said McDowell. "There is no federal standard for number of beds per elderly population, but we have tried to figure out what kind of unmet demand there is. Our most reliable data indicates that we would be meeting needs if we had 54 beds per thousand. When the new beds are available,. we will have about 43 beds per thousand."

Complicating the figures on how many more beds are needed is the trend toward providing in-home or other alternative care for the aged. Planners and county specialists in long-term care want day care and foster care programs developed to supplement such existing alternatives as visiting nurses, homemakers, Meals-on-Wheels, transportation programs and telephone visitor" programs. Should these programs become widespread, health planners estimate that 45 nursing home beds per 1,000 elderly residents would be sufficient. Four levels of care

Not everyone entering a nursing home needs the same kind of care: Some simply need a protective environment in which help is available to get out of bed or get dressed; others need professional nursing care supervision 24 hours a day.

A nursing home may provide one of more of four levels of care: Skilled, intermediate, personal or residential. Each home must be licensed by the state for the levels of care provided. Levels vary on the amount and degree of medical supervision and overall services. In addition, homes participating in the Medicaid or Medicare program must meet federal certification requirements.

Skilled care is the most intensive nursing care available outside an acute-care hospital. State regulations determine the minimum hours of professional nursing care per patient that must be provided and also stipulate when had how often a physician must be a part of care.

Intermediate care is a less intensive form of care. It does not require the same degree of professional medical supervision as skilled care.

Personal care refers to assistance in walking, bathing and dressing which is provided by a non-professional staff. It is a protective enviroment with assistance in daily living.

Residential or domiciliary care is room and board.

Three facilities in Northern Virginia are now offering "life care" for elderly citizens. Under the life care system, a person - or couple - moves into an apartment or room in the facility when healthy. He or she pays a monthly fee that includes rent, some supervised care and recreational activities. Should a resident become ill or infirm, her or she then has access to the nursing care beds at the facility. Usually there is not additional charge beyond the regular monthly fee for skilled care.

So long as a private patient is willing to pay for it, he can enter a nursing home and use any level bed available. That is, even if in intermediate or personal care bed is advised, a private patient can use a skilled bed. Medicaid patients can use only the level bed for which they have been medically certified. Costs

As nursing homes have upgraded their care to meet federal and state standards, the price of care increased. Today, rates in Northern Virginia nursing homes are from $750 to $1,200 a month for skilled or intermediate care; and from $425 (at a life-care facility which requires a buy-in fee) to $650 a month for personal for residential care.

Many private patients who enter nursing homes use their savings to pay the bill. Sometimes they sell their home and use that money to pay for care. When private patients outlive their assests, they can apply to Medicaid for help.

To be eligible for Medicaid coverage of nursing home bills, residents must show they have neither the income nor the resources to pay the bill. A son or daughter's financial situation does not count. The prospective nursing home resident must also be medically certified for skill or intermediate care.

In addition, Medicaid patients can use only Medicaid-certified beds. Nursing homes are sometimes unwilling to accept Medicaid patients because payments from local jurisdictions do not come close to meeting private patient payments. (Medicaid patients are not required to make up the difference.) Of all the metropolitan area jurisdictions, Virginia offers its nursing homes the most generous reimbursements.

While the District pays a miximum of $600 per patient per month for skilled care and Maryland pays $775 per month per patient for skilled care, Virginia pays an average of $1,024.80 per patient per month of skilled care. According to Bob Treibley, manager of provider reimbursement in Richmond, Northern Virginia homes generally receive payments above the state average. He estimates the Virginia Medicaid pays Northern Virginia homes 90 per cent of what a private patient pays.

Of the 12 Northern Virginia facilties offering skilled or intermediate care, only seven have been certified for Medicaid. A problem that private patients in non-Medicaid certified facilities face is a sudden need to transfer to new facilities if they outlive their assets and can no longer pay.

Medicaid does not cover personal care homes or beds. Those in need of financial help for these beds can apply for federal assistance through the Supplemental Security Income program, which is based on income and need and is available to the aged, blind or disabled. It is administered by the Social Security Administration.

Medicare, government-sponsored insurance through Social Security, is available to those 65 years old and older but is covers nursing home costs for a limited number of days and then only when the illness of condition is one that has previously required hospitalization. Many Medicare patients transfer directly from hospital to nursing home.

Few private health insurance plans cover extended or long-term care in a nursing home. The Guide

Basic information on each licensed home with more than 20 beds is contained in this Guide, including: Name of administrator, the levels of care available, whether there are private rooms, rates for semi-private rooms, whether the facility participates in or is certified for Medicaid or Medicare, and whether a waiting list is maintained.

For the most part, rates at skilled and intermediate are facilities do not include such extras as hand feeding or incontinent care, both of which are usually $1.50 extra per day. Laundry may of may not be included in a rate at any level. When extras are included in the basic rate, that fact is noted in the Guide.

BARCROFT INSTITUTE, 2960 Sleepy Hollow Rd., Falls Church; 536-200; administrator: Mary Kelleher.

A 7-year-old proprietary home with 120 beds on the intermediate level. No private rooms available now. Rates are $25 and $27 a day for basic care. Home participates in Medicaid. There is a short waiting list.

FAIRFAX NURSING CENTER, 10701 Main St., Fairfax; 273-7705; administrator: Charmaine Bainum.

A 13-year-old nursing home with 200 beds at the intermediate and skilled levels. These are private, semi-private and four-bed rooms. The home is certified for Medicare. Rates for a semi-private room are $30 a day. There is no wait at the present time.

GOODWIN HOUSE, 4800 Fillmore Ave., Alexandria; 578-1000; administrator* James Mehary Jr.

An 9-year old nonprofit retirement or life care facility under the sponsorship of the Episcopal diocese of Virginia. (There are no religious requirements for entry.) The home has 274 apartments, 60 skilled nursing care beds and 30 physical assistance beds. Ninety-eight per cent of the nursing care beds are filled by residents of the life care unit. Life care residents pay an initial $18,000 to $20,000 to move in, plus a monthly maintenance fee of $425. This covers care in the nursing unit if needed. Non-residents pay $44 a day for a skilled care bed when beds are available. The home is certified for both Medicaid and Medicare. A waiting list is maintained. The wait averages a year and a half to two years.

HERMITAGE METHODIST HOME, 5000 Fairbanks Ave., Alexandria; 820-2434, administrator: Joseph Crowder.

A 14-year-old nonprofit nursing and retirement home (no religious requirement) with 225 residential beds and 121 nursing beds on the skilled level. Nursing home beds reserved for residents of retirement facility. They are not certified for Medicaid or Medicare. Waiting list for residential facility is 8 months to a year.

ILIFF NURSING HOME, 8000 Iliff Dr., Dunn Loring; 560-1000; administrator: D.G. Dennis.

Iliff has been in operation since 1929, but an all-new building was put up 10 years ago. It is a proprietary home with 130 beds at the skilled and intermediate levels; there are private, two, three-and four-bed rooms. Rates are $29.50 a day for a semi-private room, basic rate. The home is eligible for but not participating in Medicare and Medicaid programs. The home can usually accomodate a new resident within two or three days waiting time.

LEEWOOD NURSING HOME, 7120 Braddock Rd., Annandale; 258-9770; administrator: Dorothy Abel.

A 6-year-old proprietary home with 132 intermediate level beds in double or single rooms. A separate addition is being constructed and it will accomodate day care residents and weekend residents as well as adult nursing home residents. Rates are $35 a day for basic care in the nursing home, and $25 in the new home for adults. The home is participating in the Medicaid program; it is certified for but not participating in Medicare as yet. There are some vacancies.

MANOR CARE, 550 South Carlyn Springs R., Arlington; 379-7200; administrator: Peggy Davies.

This new Manor Care facility opened Jan. 4 with 200 beds. There are private, semi-private and three-bed rooms as well as "heritage" rooms, which are more elaborately furnished suites. The home has applied for Medicaid/Medicare certification for skilled and intermediate beds. Rates are $42 and $45 a day for private, $29 and $32 for semi-private, and $27 and $29 for three-bed rooms. "Heritage" rooms are $35 a day. Rates include room, board and general 24-hour nursing care. Ancillary services, such as hand feeding, are extra. There were many available beds when called.

OAK MEADOW NURSING HOME, 1510 Collingwood Rd., Alexandria; 765-6107; administrator: retired Army Col. Boyd Cooksley.

Operating since 1965, this proprietary home has 96 beds on the skilled and intermediate level. There are eight private rooms, the rest are doubles. Rates for intemediate care are $30 a day; skilled care is $35 a day all inclusive except for oxygen or catheter care. Oak Meadow is participating in both Medicaid and Medicare. A waiting list is kept but vacancies are filled by those who call when there is a vacancy.

OAKTON NURSING HOME, 10322 Blake Lane, Otakton; 281-4418; Administrator: C. Arthur Fowler, F.A.C.N.H.A.

A 23-year-old, proprietary home with 27 intermediate care beds. Most rooms are semi-private with a few private available. Minimum rates is $750 a month for all services except physician, medicine, hand feeding, blindness, paralysis, special diets and incontinency. The home participates in Medicaid. A waiting just is maintained with the average wait for a bed being up to three months.

POWHATAN NURSING HOME, 2100 Powhatan St., Falls Church; 538-2400; Administrator: Joan Kraynock.

A 10-year-old proprietary home with 160 beds on the skilled and intermediate levels. Rooms are private and semi-privates. Rates of $35 a day inclue in continent care. The home is certified for both Medicare and Medicaid but particpating only in Virginia Medicaid. A waiting list is maintained.

SLEEPY HOLLOW MANOR NURSING AND CONVALESCENT HOME, 6700 Columbia Pike, Annandale; 256-7000; Administrator: Mary Harrison.

A 15-year-old proprietary home with 226 beds at custodial, intermediate and skilled levels. There are private and semi-private rooms. Basic rates are $775 to $1,200 a month. The home does not participle in Medicaid or Medicare. They maintain a waiting list.

WASHINGTON HOUSE, 5100 Filmore Ave., Alexandria; 379-9000; Administrator: James Robertson.

A 4-year-old non-profit home with 255 residential beds in private rooms or apartments and 41 skilled care beds. Nursing care beds are available only to those who are already residents of Washington House. Residents pay same monthly fee for skilled care facility as they do for residential quarters. Rates are between $385 and $425 a month, Depending on age. No beds are certified for Medicaid or Medicare. No waiting list is maintained; vacancies are fill on first-call, first served basis.

WOODBINE NURSING HOME, 2729 King St., Alexandria; 836-8838; Administrator: Vivian Hewett.

This 11-year-old proprietary facility has 155 skilled and intermediate care beds in private, semi-private and 3-or 4-bed rooms; a 100-bed addition should be completed by March and will include day care facilities. Rates are $27.50 a day, with charges for extra care. The home is certified for and participating in Medicaid and Medicare programs. A waiting list is maintained, with waits for an intermediate bed being between two and three years for Medicaid patients; shorter waits for skilled care beds. Private patients have a shorter waiting time. MARYLAND FACILITIES

PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY

AMERICAN NURSING HOME AND CONVALESCENT CENTER, 9211 Stuart Lane, Clinton; 868-3600; administrator; Natalie Willwerth.

Once called pine View Gardens, American came under new ownership in 1969. The home now has 265 intermediate and skilled beds in mostly double and some single rooms. The $25-a-day rate includes all care. The home is licensed and certified for Medicare and for Maryland and D.C. Medicaid. A waiting list is maintained; they are presently filled.

CARROLL MANOR, 4922 LaSalle Rd., Hyattsville; 864-2333; administrator: Mother Francis Michael.

A nonprofit home with a religious orientation (Roman Catholic), Carroll Manor is open to anyone. There are 228 licensed beds, intermediate and residential, in private and semi-private rooms. The home is certified for Medicaid. The highest rate is $800 per month for room, board and full nursing care. There is a waiting list.

GREENBELT CONVALESCENt CENTER, 7010 Greenbelt Rd. Greenbelt; administrator: Carol Powell, RN, NHA.

A 10-year old proprietary home with 132 skilled and intermediate beds. There are 11 three-bed rooms, 3 private rooms, and the rest are doubles. Rates begin at $34.50 per day, all inclusive. The home is certified for Medicare and Medicaid but accepts only Maryland Medicaid. A waiting list is maintained. There is 24-hour RN nursing care.

MADISON MANOR NURSING HOME, 5801 42d Ave., Hyattsville; 864-4477; administrator: Ellis Duke.

A 27-bed proprietary home offering intermediate care, the home has been in operation for 16 years. There are double rooms as well as three-bed and four-bed wards. Rates are $700 a month, all inclusive. The home participates in Medicaid but not Medicare. No waiting list is maintained; the home was filled when called.

MAGNOLIA GARDENS NURSING HOME, 8200 Good Luck Rd., Lanham; 522-200; administrator: William Greco.

A 13-year-old proprietary home, Magnolia Gardens has 104 intemediate and skilled beds in private or semi-private rooms. Rates are $27-a-day for basic care. The home is certified for Medicaid but takes only Maryland Medicaid patients. A waiting list is maintained.

MANOR CARE-ADELPHI, 1801 Metzerott Rd., Adelphi; 434-0500; administrator: Robert L. Bryant.

A seven-year old proprietary home with 210 beds at the skilled and intermediate levels, the home has private, semi-private and three-bed rooms. Rates are $28-a-day basic rate. The home is certified for Medicaid and Medicare but takes only Marland Medicaid patients. There is a waiting list for beds at all levels.

MANOR CARE - HYATTSVILLE, 6500 Riggs Rd., Hyattsville; 559-0300; administrator: Martha Arps.

A 12-year-old proprietary home with 151 beds at the skilled and intermediate levels, a the home offers rooms in private, semi-private and thee-bed accommondations. Rates range from $27 to $36-a-day for room, board and basic nursing care. They are certified for and participating in Maryland Medicaid and Medicare. There is a waiting list for Medicaid patients only.

MANOR CARE - LARGO, 600 Largo rd., Rte 202, Upper Marlboro; 350-5555; administor: Maggie Sybert.

This new proprietary facility started to accept patients Nov. 15. There are 120 skilled and intermediate care beds in private, semi-private and three-bed units. The home is planning to qualify for Medicaid and Medicare certification. Only licensed for 55 beds at this time. There are openings.

PAINT BRANCH HOME, 3120 Powder Mill Rd., Adelphi; 937-7447; administrator: Frederick Stoarck, Jr.

Operating for 10 years under its present management, this proprietary home offers 30 custodial care beds. Care is non-nursing but provides assitance with daily needs. Rooms are private, semi-private and 3, 4, and 6-bed wards. Rates are $15 to start, and go up depending on need for assistance.There was no waiting list when the home was called.

PRINCE GEORGE'S GENERAL HOSPITAL NURSING HOME (Extended Care Facility), Hospital Road, Cheverly; 341-3350; administrator: Sanford Wilcox.

In operation since 1968, this nursing facility is located close to Prince George's General Hospital. Patients can come directly from the hospital or from the community in general. There are 100 beds: 20 are special hospital beds for chronic illness; 70 are skilled care beds; 10 are intermediate care beds. Rates for skilled and intermediate beds are $32 a day including some extras. The home is certified for Medicare and Medicaid. The program emphasizes rehabilitation services for patient stays of six months or less.

REGENCY NURSING AND REHABILITATION CENTER, 7420 Marlboro Pike, Forestville; 736-0240; administrator: Jean Rock.

A 10-year-old proprietary home, Regency has 160 skilled and intermediate beds in private, semi-private and 3-bed rooms. The rates of $27 to $29 are for room and board only. The home is certified for both Medicare and Maryland Medicaid. There is a waiting list.

SACREd HEART HOME, 5805 Queens Chapel Rd., Hyattsville; 277-6500; administrator: Sister Mary Agnes.

A 50-year-old nonprofit Catholic facility, the home has no religious requirement for admission. The home has 102 beds and is certified for intermediate "A" levels of care. There are 100 private rooms. Rates are currently $25 per day. They are certified for Medicaid. There is a waiting list of one year to 18 months.

SUITLAND NURSING HOME, 2405 Whitehall St., Suitland; 736-8210; administrator: Rena Weber.

A 34-bed proprietary home offering intermediate level care. Suitland administrator Rena Weber refused to give any further information over the telephone. The home participates in Medicaid.

VILLA ROSA NURSING HOME, 3800 Lostford Vista Rd., Mitchelville; 459-4700; administrator: The Rev. Anthony Dal Balcon.

A nonprofit home run by the Scalabrini Fathers and Sisters, there is no religious requirement for entry. There are 59 intermediate care rooms in private and semi-private accommodations. Rates are $480 monthly ($510 for private) for basic care. The home has been operating since 1967; it does not participate in Medicaid or Medicare. There is a long waiting list, with waiting times of six months to more than a year. The home is planning an extension to 100 beds in mid-May. MONTGOMERY COUNTY

ALTHEA WOODLAND, 1000 Daleview Dr., Silver Spring; 434-2646; administrator: Ron Carsell.

A proprietary home in operation for 14 years, Althea Woodland has 52 beds offering care in the skilled, intermediate and domiciliary levels. There are private and semi-private rooms. Rates are $27.50 for semi-private and $32 and $34 a day for private rooms. The home was begun by Seventh Day Adventists, but there are no religious requirements for entry. A waiting list is maintained but the administrator said waiting time varied from no wait at all to two months.

ASBURY METHODIST HOME, 201 Russell Ave, and Herman M. Wilson Health Center, 301 Russell ave., Gaithersbury; 926-4900; administrator: Ronald H. Wilson; home administrator: A.W. Porterfield.

The home is under the direction of the Baltimore Methodist Conference, a non-profit voluntary corporation. There is a Baltimore Conference membership requirement for admission into the home.

The Asbury home has been in Operation for 50 years.It offers 180 domiciliary care beds, mostly in private rooms with some doubles for married couples. There is some supervised care. Rates are $317 a month and there is a waiting list to get into the home. The Wilson facility has 1200 beds at the skilled and intermediate level. Rates are $29.50 a day intermediate; $31.50 skilled, no extras. The Center participates in Medicaid and Medicare. It opened in 1975

Under construction is a 134-unit apartment complex for independent living. There is already a long waiting list for the new apartments.

BEL PRE HEALTH CENTER, 2601 Bel Pre Rd., Silver Spring; 598-600; administrator: Bob Sullivan.

A 14-year-old proprietary home with 98 skilled beds, the home has private, semi-private and ward accomodations. Bel Pre participates in both Medicaid and Medicare. Rates are $25 and $27 a day for basic care. There is a waiting list but personnel at the home said it was not usually a long list.

BETHESDA RETIREMENT AND NURSING CENTER, 8700 Jones Mill Rd., Chevy chase; 657-9686; administrator: Jeanetta Manuel.

A 10-year-old proprietary home, Bethesda-Silver Spring offers care at several levels: Retirement, general and skilled care. There are private, semi-private and two-room suit accommodations. The rates are $35 a day for skilled care, $33 for general and $94 for residential. The home participates in Medicare but not in Medicaid. There is a waiting list for certain kinds of accommodations, most particularly private rooms in residential or retirement care.

BROOKE GROVE NURSING HOME, 18430 Brooke Grove Rd., Olney; 924-4475; administrator: Ethel Nesbitt.

A nonprofit home affiliated with the Seventh Day Adventist Church (no religious requirement for entry into the home), Brooke Grove has 97 intermediate and skilled beds, some in private rooms, others in doubles and wards of four beds.The home has been operating for 26 years. Rates are $27 for intermediate care covering room, board, nursing care and laundry.

CARRIAGE HILL NURSING HOME AND CONVALESCENT CENTER 9101 2nd Ave., Silver Spring; 588-5544; administrator: Ruth Reynolds.

An eight-year-old proprietary facility that serves as a stepping stone between home and hospital, this 80-bed facility offers skilled care only. Rates are $27 to $38, depending on level of care and diagnosis. Presribed medications are extra. The home participates in Medicare but not Medicaid, and is certified by the Joint Commission of Hospitals. It also has a contract with Blue Cross of Maryland. The waiting list fluctuates, said a spokesman for the home, but the facility stays about 95 per cent filled.

CHEVY CHASE NURSING AND CONVALESCENT CENTER, 2015 East-West Hwy., Silver Spring; 587-2400; administrator: Harold Behrmann.

A 14-year-old proprietary home, Chevy Chase has 87 skilled care beds in double single and ward units. Rates are $30-a-day, all inclusive. The home is certified for Medicare and Maryland Medicaid. There is a waiting list, with waits usually a week or two at most.

CIRCLE MANOR NURSING HOME, 10231 Carroll Pl., Kensington; 949-0222; administrator: Patricia Spriggs.

A four-year old proprietary facility with 86 intermediate level beds. Rooms are private, semi-private and Wards. Rates are $18 to $27 (depending on whether the resident is in A or B level intermediate) and include room and board, all nursing care, recreational activities and special diets. The home is participating in Medicaid for Maryland residents. A waiting list is maintained.

COLLINGSWOOD NURSING CENTER, 299 Hurley Avenue, Rockville; 762-8900; administrator: Thomas L. Callahan.

A 3 1/2-year-old proprietary home with 157 skilled and intermediate level bes, private and semi-private rooms. Rates are $34.50 to $41 a day. The homes is certified for both Medicaid and Medicare. Bed availability varies.

COLONIAL VILLA, 12325 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring; 622-4600; administrator: Donna Gordon.

A 10-year-old proprietary home owned by Seventh Day Adventists with 91 skilled and intermediate beds. There are a few private rooms, mostly semi-private rooms and some four-bed wards. Rates are $29 a day for basic wards. Rates are $29 a day for basic care. The home participates in bothe Medicaid and Medicare. There is a waiting list with placements sometimes within a day or two and sometime with in several weeks.

FAIRLAND NURSING HOME, 2101 Fairland Rd., Silver Spring; 384-6161; administrator: Fay Lucas.

An 18-year-old proprietary home with 83 skilled and intermediate beds. There are a few private rooms, mostly semi-private rooms. Rates are $28 a day for room, board and basic nursing care. The home participates in Medicaid and Medicare. No waiting list is maintained; the home was completely full when called.

FERNWOOD HOUSE, 6530 Democracy Blvd. Bethesda; 530-9000; administrator: Karen Jones.

Fernwood was 3 years old in January. There are 81 skilled and 19 intermediate beds in semi-private and private rooms. Rates are $37 a day semi-private and $46 a day for a private room, which covers room, board and general nursing care. The home is certified for Medicare. A waiting list is maintained.

FRIENDS HOUSE NURSING HOME. 17340 Quaker Lane, Sandy Spring; 924-4900; administrator: Robert Mills.

Friends is a 4-year-old non-profit home sponsored by the Baltimore Yearly Meeting of Friends. There are nor religious requirements for entry, however. The home maintains 45 skilled and intermediate beds in mainly double rooms. Rates are $30 a day basic fee. The home participates in Medicaid. There is a six-months wait.

HEBREW HOME OF GREATER WASHINGTON, 3121 Montrose Rd., Rockville; 881-0300; administrator: Samuel Roberts.

A nonprofit sectarian home in operation since 1914, the Hebrew Home has 266 skilled and intermediate beds. Ninety per cent of the rooms are private. Rates are $1,100 a month but vary according to ability to pay. The home participates in both Medicaid and medicare and reports that 80 per cent of residents are on Medicaid. There is a waiting list with an 18-month waiting time.

KENSINGTON GARDENS NURSING HOME, 3000 McComas Ave., Kensington; 933-0060; administrator: Charlotte Sesocks.

The proprietary home has been in existence for 30 years, and management changed nine years ago. Kensington has 170 skilled and intermediate beds in semi-private and private rooms. Rates are $29.50 a day basic rate. The home is certified for both Medicaid and Medicare.

MANOR CARE OF WHEATON, 11901 Georgia Ave., Wheaton; 942-2500; administrator: Dee Wilcher.

A 16-year-old proprietary home with 97 skilled, intermediate and residential beds. Rooms are private, semi-private and four-bed ward. Rates are $29.50 though $40.50 a day for basic care. The home is certified for both Medicaid and Medicare. There is a waiting list.

POTOMAC VALLEY NURSING HOME, 1235 Potomac Valley Rd. Rockville; 762-0700; administrator: Sally Robbins.

A 12-year-old proprietary home with 126 skilled and 42 intermediate beds, Potomac Valley has private, semi-private and four-bed wards. Rates begin at $28.50 a day for basic care and activities. The participate in both Medicaid and Medicare. A waiting list is maintained.

RANDOLPH HILLs NURSING HOME, 4011 Randolph Rd., Wheaton; 933-2500; administrator: Harvey Wertleib.

A 10-year old proprietary home with 95 skilled and intermediate beds, the home has semi-private rooms. Rates are $28 a day all inclusive except laundry. The home is certified for Medicaid and Medicare. A waiting list is maintaing with waits usually a few days to a couple of weeks.

ROCKVOLLE NURSING HOME, 303 Adclare Rd., Rockville; 279-9000; administrator: Robert Parker.

When fully operational, this nonprofit, church sponsored but non-sectarian home will have 100 beds. Eighteen to 24 beds are due to open Presently. Skilled and intermediate "A" beds in private and semi-private rooms will be available. The home is planning to participate in Medicaid and Medicare. Rates are $28 for semi-private, $36 for private. Rates include incontinent care and hand feeding.

SHARON NURSIN HOME, 18201 Marden La., Olney; 924-4475; administrator: Carl Howe.

A 24-year old nonprofit home sponsored by the Brooke Grove Foundation, a private nonprofit corporation, Sharon Nursing Home has 43 intermediate beds in double and single rooms. Rates are $25 a day for basic care. The home is certified for Medicaid. A waiting list is maintained. The wait is from a week to two months.

SLIGO GARDENS NURSING HOME, 7525 Carroll Ave., Takoma park; 270-4200 administrator; Margaret Taggart.

A 7-year-old proprietary home connected to the Seventh Day Adventist Church but not owned by them, Sligo Gardens has no religious requirement and maintains 100 skilled care beds in private, semi-private and ward accommodations. Although certified for Medicaid and Medicare, the home is cutting back on Medicaid participation. There is a waiting list and three were no vacancies when the home was called.

SYLVAN MANOR HEALTH CARE CENTER, 2700 Barker Street, Silver Spring; 565-0370; administrators: Morton and Sanford Rosen.

A 14-year-old proprietary home, Syivan Manor has 29 beds at skilled and 7 beds at Intermediate "A" level. Rates are $29 a day semi-private and $32 for private rooms. Incontinent care is extra in some cases. The home is certified for Maryland Medicaid. No waiting list is maintained.

UNIVERSITY NURSING HOME, 901 Arcola Ave., Wheaton; 649-2400; administrator: Robert Hagerman Jr.

A 12-year-old proprietary home, University has 150 skilled and residential care beds in private, semi-private and four-bed accomodations. Rates start at $29 a day for basic care. The home is certified for Medicaid and Medicare and is also participating in Veterans Administration, Health Maintenance Organization and Civilian Health and Medical Program Uniform Services programs. A waiting list is maintained for skilled beds.

WILDWOOD HEALTH CENTER, 5721 Grosvenor La., Bethesda; 530-1000; administrator: Shirley D. McKnight.

A proprietary home that came under new management three years ago, Wildwood has 180 skilled and intermediate beds in semi-private and private rooms. Rates are $27-a-day for basic. The home is certified for Medicaid and Medicare.A waiting list is maintained.

THE WESTWOOD RETIREMENT HOME, 5101 Ridgefield Rd., Bethesda; 657-9111; administrator: Sandra Lilly.

An 11-year old proprietary home, the Westwood has 69 residential beds, all with private room and bath. Rates are $39 to $45 a day and include meals, daily maid service, housekeeping, 24-hour nursing supervision, room service, limousine service and recreational activities. There is no waiting list. DISTRICT FACILITIES

ARMY DISTAFF HALL, 6200 Oregon Ave. NW. 966-3073; Administrator and apartment house manager. Wyly Jones.

A privately supported nonprofit facility in operation since 1962, Army Distaff Hall is available only to women 62 years old or older who are the widows, mothers, mothers-in-law or sisters of career Army personnel. There are 282 apartments plus 48 beds which offer supervised personal care to residents when required. Admission fee ($5,500 to $15,500) plus monthly service fee ($104 to $239). For personal assistance, rate is $400 a month plus cost of meals. There is a waiting list of 18 months to five years depending on the apartment.

BAPTIST HOME OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 3700 Nebraska Ave. NW; 363-9644; Administrator: William Harris.

A nonprofit, church-sponsored philanthropic home, Baptist Home has been in operation since 1880. Prospective residents must be 62 years old or older or infirm; priority is given to Baptists but being a Baptist is not a requirement for entry. There are 40 intermediate care beds and 36 residential care beds. Rates are $905 a month adjusted to a resident's ability to pay. The home is certified for Medicaid patients at the intermediate level. There is currently a one year wait for admittance.

A new facility, called Thomas House, opened Jan. 1, for residents over 62 years old who are able to maintain themselves in their own apartments. There are 205 one-bedroom and efficiency apartments. Rates are $375 per month for single occupancy, which includes an evening meal and 10 days of free nursing care per year, along with housekeeping service and recreational activities.There is currently no waiting list for the apartments. An additional 58-bed nursing care unit is scheduled to be completed this fall, and Medicaid and Medicare have been applied for.

D.C. VILLAGE, 2 Village La. SW; 629-8423; acting executive director: David Schwartz.

Operated by the District government, D.C. Village has a maximum capacity of 700 beds at the intermediate and skilled level. Only 496 of these beds are in use. There is a temporary freeze on admission in an attempt to lower the population to meet Medicaid standards.More beds will become available as repairs and additional staffing is accomplished. The rates at D.C. Village are $36 a day for intermediate care, $57 a day for skilled care, all inclusive.

ELIZABETH R. SHOEMAKER HOME, 2701 Military Rd. NW; 362-7430; director: Mary Taylor.

An endowed home with 20 residential beds in private rooms, this facility is for indigent, unmarried women over 60 years of age who can care for themselves. There are no specific rates. There were vacancies when called.

EPISCOPAL CHURCH HOME, 1515 32d St. NW; 338-1040; administrator: Garland Lewis.

A nonprofit residential, long-term care home under the supervision of a board of governors who are members of the diocese of Washington, the home requires all residents to be members of the Episcopal diocese.There are 52 residential beds. The home has been operating since 1958. The rates are based on cost of care and the applicants' ability to pay. There are currently some vacancies.

LISNER HOME, 5425 Western Ave. NW; 966-6667; administrator: D. Migas.

A privately funded home for women, there are 70 residential beds and 10 nursing care beds for residents of the home only. The home has been in operation since 1941. Because of the private funding, there are no set rates. The home does not participate in Medicaid or Medicare.

LITTLE SISTERS OF THE POOR, 220 H St. NW; 543-8663; administrator: Sister Bernadette.

A 105-year old nonprofit facility run by a Catholic order. The only requirement for entry is that a person be over 60 years of age and poor. There are 133 intermediate beds. The home participates in Medicaid. There are 350 people on the waiting list.

MARY CORRINE NURSING HOME, 1887 Monroe St. NW; 483-5099; administrator: Ralph Cooke.

A 10-year-old proprietary home, Mary Corrine has 25 intermediate level beds in semi-private rooms. Both Medicaid and Medicare patients are accepted. Rates are $650 a month. No waiting list is maintained.

MAR SALLE CONVALESCENT CENTER, 2131 O St. NW; 785-2577; executive director: Sally Mills.

A 14-year-old proprietary home, Mar Salle has 202 skilled and intermediate beds in both private and semi-private rooms. Rates are $29 to $35 a day inclusive. The home is certified for both Medicaid and Medicare. When called, the home had 50 patients waiting for Medicaid beds. There was no waiting list for private patients.

THE MASONIC AND EASTERN STAR HOME OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 6000 New Hampshire Ave. NE; 882-9300; administrator: George Worth.

A nonprofit home for members of the Order of the Eastern Star and Masonic Order, the facility converted to 67 skilled and 67 intermediate beds as of Dec. 1. There are no rates. The home is not certified for Medicare or Medicaid. There is a waiting list.

METHODIST HOME OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 4901 Connecticut Ave. NW; 966-7623; administrator: Elsie Lesko.

A nonprofit home run by the Methodist Women, residents must be members of a Methodist church in Washington or suburban Maryland for 10 years to enter the home. The facility has been in operation for more than 80 years and has 94 beds, 29 of which are intermediate care, the rest are residential. Nursing care beds are available only to residents. There are no set rates. The home accepts Medicare but not Medicaid residents. There is a long waiting list.

NATIONAL LUTHERAN HOME FOR THE AGED, 18th and Douglas Streets NE; 529-6122; administrator: The Rev. Richard Reichard.

A nonprofit home run by the Virginia and Maryland synods of the Lutheran Church in America and the Potomac Conference of the Eastern District of the American Luthern Church, the facility has three admission plans, two of which give preference to Lutherans. Lutherans may enter by the trustee plan or assistance plan (for the indigent). Non-Lutherans can enter in the boarding plan which is a pay-as-you-go plan. There is a one-time admission charge under this plan of between $1,000 and $2,500, depending on assets, plus a monthly maintenance fee of $900. The home has 300 intermediate and skilled beds, the majority of them in single rooms. They are certified for Medicaid and Medicare. There is a waiting list for those needing nursing care.

PRESBYTERIAN HOME OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 3050 Military Rd. NW; 363-6116; administrator: Dr. K. Warriston McCracken.

A nonprofit home run by the Presbyterian Home Corporation, this facility has 80 residential and nursing care beds. Nursing beds are available only to residents. Rates are a $1,000 admission fee and a buy-in fee starting at $6,000 plus monthly maintenance charge of $465, including meals and utilities. The home is not certified for Medicaid or Medicare. There is a long waiting list. The home is building an addition with more residential and nursing type beds.

STODDARD BAPTIST HOME, 1818 Newton St. NW; 667-5511; administrator: Leon Ferguson.

A nonprofit home with no religious requirement for entry, Stoddard has been operating for 74 years. There are 60 residential beds in private, semi-private and three-bed rooms. The cost of care is $400 monthly adjusted according to ability to pay. The home hopes to expand and offer health care eventually. There is no waiting list at the present time.

WASHINGTON HOME FOR INCURABLES, 3720 Upton St. NW; 966-3720; administrator: David Matlack.

A nonprofit home operating since 1889, the facility has been at its present location since 1924. There are 122 skilled care beds and 56 intermediate care beds, almost all are in private rooms. Current full charge rate is $900 a month, plus charges for medically ordered ancillary services. The home is certified for Medicare and Medicaid. There is a waiting list.

WISCONSIN AVENUE NURSING HOME, 3333 Wisconsin Ave. Nw; 362-5500; administrator: Ann Philbin.

A 3-year-old proprietary home, the facility has 400 skilled, intermediate and residential care beds in private and semi-private rooms. Rates go from $27 a day for residential care in a semi-private room to $40 a day for skilled care also semi-private. The home is certified for Medicare but not Medicaid. No waiting list is maintained.