Votes of area members of the Congress on key roll calls for the week ending March 11, 1977. SENATE

Warnke Nomination. By a 58-to-40 vote, the Senate confirmed President Carter's nomination of Paul C. Warnke to head the U.S. delegation to the strategic arms limitation (SALT) talks with the Russians. The vote in favor of the nomination, however, was less than the two-thirds Senate majority that would be necessary to approve a new SALT treaty.

Opponents charges that Warnke's long public record of opposition to many U.S. weapons programs undercut his credibility as a negotiator and indicated that he was a poor judge of Soviet aims and weaponry.

Supporters insisted that the opponents were quoting out of context recommendations that Warnke had made at various points over an eight-year period, and that the President was entitled to have the negotiator of his choice:

Voting to confirm Warnke as SALT negotiator: MARYLAND - Mathias (R), Sarbanes (D).

Water projects Amendment. By a 65-24 vote, the Senate adopted an amendment to a public works bill intended to force President Carter to spend funds appropriated by Congress for 19 water projects. The administration had proposed no funds for the projects, mainly dams and irrigation facilities location in the West, in its amendments to the fiscal 1978 budget.

Backers of the water projects amendment argued that a warning to the President was necessary. They claimed that only Congress could decide whether to cancel particular projects, and that the administration's list of [WORD ILLEGIBLE] projects had been compited "on the flimsiest kind of evidence."

Opponents of the water projects amendment essentially backed the administration's position that the projects posed serious economic and environmental questions that should be addressed before proceeding further. They made clear, however, that they did not support impoundment of appropriated funds.

Voting for water projects amendment: MARYLAND - Mathias (R), Sarbanes (D). HOUSE

Tax Cuts. President Carter's plan for $50 rebates survived a Republican effort to kill it. The House rejected by a vote of 194 to 219 an attempt to drop the rebates and provide instead cuts in individual tax rates in the lowest tax brackets.

Sponsors of the move argued that the lower tax rates would bring more permanent improvements in the economy and that the $50 rebate was too small to be of any use and was difficult to administer.

Opponents of the lower tax rates said that the rebate was the best way to inject stimulus quickly into the economy and that in combination with other portions of the administration's package it would improve the nation's economy.

Voting for the tax cuts in place of the tax rebates: MARYLAND - Bauman (R), Holt (R), Long (D), Steets (R).

Voting against tax rate cuts: MARYLAND - Bynots (D), [WORD ILLEGIBLE] (D), Mitchell (D), Spellman (D).