Black newspaper publisher Calvin W. Rolark asked the D.C. Office of Human Rights yesterday to investigate whether blacks have been unfairly discriminated against in the hiring and promotional practices of the Corporation Counsel's Office.

Corporation Counsel John R. Risher Jr. disclosed last month that during the past year, the number of blacks in the counsel's office had slipped from 18 to 16, despite his assurances a year ago that he would try to hire more blacks.

In more figures, the number has dropped even further. There are now 14 blacks among 98 attorneys in the office. As of Jan. 1, the latest date for which figures were previously available, there were 16 blacks among 101 lawyers.

Risher, who said yesterday that he would soon be hiring two more blacks for the office, defended his won efforts to recuit and advance blacks while at the same time trying to improve the image of the office, which is the principal lawyer for the city.

"My figures on minority hiring do not make me particularly happy," said Risher, who is black. "I'm not unhappy when I took at the quality of the attorneys I have here."

Since being appointed corporation counsel by Mayor Walter E. Washington in March, 1976, Risher has hired 19 lawyers, of whom three have been black and one a Latino.

Among the lawyers on his staff, there have been 26 promotions during that period. Of these promotions, Risher said yesterday, three have gone to blacks and the other 23 to whites, including four to white women.

Risher has five division chief positions, one of which is vacant and the other four of which are held by whites. As of January, there were four blacks among the 42 persons in upper level jobs (GS-14 and above). There are three now.

Rolark, who is editor publisher of The Washington Informer and a longtime community activist said yesterday that his complaint was filed out of concerns that little had been done to improve black hiring in the office since the city was granted limited home rule in 1974.

"It's one of those thins that has been inherited though the years," Rolark said. "But we haven't moved anywhere."

James W. Baldwin, director of the human rights office, acknowledged the filing of the complaint but would give no further detials because the case is under investigation. Baldwin said figures on how the Corporation Counsel's Office and complied with its won affirmative action guidelines could only be obtained after a written request was submitted.

Risher has said repeatedly that his efforts to recruit blacks have been hampered by competition from better paying and more prestigious private firms and federal agencies, by the heavy caseloads and by the small nonlegal support staffs in his office since the city was granted limited home rule in 1974.

"It's one of those things that has been inherited though the years," Rolark said. "But we haven't moved anywhere."

James W. Baldwin, director of the human rights, office, acknowledged the filing of the complaint but would give no further details because the case is under investigation. Baldwin said figures on how the Corporation Counsel's Office had complied with its own affirmative action guidelines could only be obtained after a written request was submitted.

Risher has said repeatedly that his efforts to recruit blacks among the 42 persons in upper level jobs (GS-14 and above). There are three now.

Rolark, who is editor publisher of The Washington Informer and a longtime community activist said yesterday that his complaint was filed out of concerns that little had been done to improve black hiring in the office since the city was granted limited home rule in 1974.

"It's one of those things that has been inherited though the years," Rolark said. "But we haven't moved anywhere."

James W. Baldwin, director of the human rights office, acknowledged the filing of the complaint but would give no further details because the case is under investigation. Baldwin said figures on how the Corporation Counsel's Office had complied with its own affirmative action guidelines could only be obtained after a written request was submitted.

Risher has said repeatedly that his efforts to recruit blacks have been hampered by competition from better paying and more prestigious private firms and federal agencies, by the heavy caseloads and by the small non-legal support staffs in his office and higher paying paralegal jobs available in other sectors of city government.

He also said that blacks and others have been discouraged because some of his new hirings must be made on a temporary basis. The City Council has mandated that he must reduce the number of lawyers in his office by at laest 10 Oct. 1. "The fact of the matter," Risher said yesterday, "is that as I was coming through the pass, I got ambushed."

Slaughter, a 1976 graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, said he applied for a job in the counsel's office but was turned down. Slaughter was subsequently hired as an attorney in the U.S. Treasury Department.

"I believe race was a factor in my not getting hired," he said. "I believe they have one black attorney (in the division he applied to) and may not have wanted any more."

Risher said he was not familiar with Slaughter's situation.