A shotgun blast came through the doorway leading to the offices of D.C. City Council members on the fifth floor of the District Building and three policemen - two armed with shotguns and the third with an automatic weapon - fired back.

"Then we heard someone just that they had a roomful of subjects inside," Sgt. Philip M. Trejchel testified yesterday in D.C. Superior Court. "A wounded person came out and Sgt. Traylor and others helped him down to the fourth-floor landing."

Trejchel said that during the brief exchange of gunfire, he fired one round from his 12-gauge shotgun through a frosted glass window at the shadow of a man holding "something long and thin."

He said Sgt. Richard Traylor was behind a table that had been shoved into the corridor outside the City Council's meeting chamber to act as a barricade, and that he fired from his automatic weaspon.

Meanwhile, two other officers apparently were trying to remove the body of Maurice Williams, 24, a reporter for radio station WHUR. Williams had been killed by a shotgun blast before police arrived.

Officer Terence B. Norman testified that since the two officers trying to retrieve Williams' body were in the line of fire from the area of the Council members officers, he fired three shots from his 12-gauge shotgun.

Trejchel and Norman were among several police officers who told a D.C. Superior Court jury yesterday about the noise, confusion and bloodshed that confronted them moments after Hanafi Muslim gunmen took over the top floor of the District Building March 9 and held it and 15 hostages until early March 11.

Events at the District Building are at the center of the government's efforts to vonvict 12 Hanafis on charges of murder and kidnaping arising from events there and from the takeover of the international headquarters of B'nai B'rith, the Jewish service organization, at 1640 Rhode Island Ave. NW, and of the Islamic Center at 2551 Massachusetts Ave. NW.

The 12 are accused of taking 149 hostages at the three sites as part of a plan to force officials to turn over to them five Black Muslims convicted of murdering seven members of the family of Hamaas Abdul Khaalis, 55, alleged leader of the plot.

Although several persons were injured at the other locations, the District Building was the only place where a death occurred.

Williams was shot and killed as the siege began. The two men charges with being directly involved were Abdul Muzikir, 22, also known as Marquette Anthony Hall, and Abdul Nuh, 28, also known as Mark E. Gibson.

Muzikir was the alleged triggerman, but all 12 defendants are charged with murder on the theory that they were acting in furtherance of a conspiracy.

The wounded person released following the exchange of shots in which Trejchel. Traylor and Norman participated was Robert J. Pierce, who was allegedly shot in the back by the Hanafis. He was helped from the area near the office of City Council Chairman Sterling Tucker by Carmencita R. Kinsey and Helen Keys, two District government employees.

Earlier yesterday, Officers Malcolm L. Hall and Carroll Hebron, the first to arrive at the scene, told how they had run up the stairs to the fifth floor and found Williams lying dead in the middle of the corridor and Mack W. Cantrell, a building guard, wounded near an elevator.

Hall said he knelt by Williams and placed his hand on his chest but found no sign of life. When he tried to join Hebron, who was giving first aid to Contrell, a shotgun blast from the hostage area forced him to take cover.

Hebron said when the blast came through the doorway, he saw it shatter glass at the fare end of they hallway where the outer office of Mayor Walter E. Washington is located.He said he dragged Cantrell onto a stairway and carried him down to safety.

Both officers said they heard screams and shouts from people inside the Council meeting chamber, where Council member Marion S. Barry was wounded.

Officer Donald C. Brooks, the mayor's bodyguard, told how had gone to the Council office area when he first heard shots and saw a man armed with a shotgun standing inside an inner office. Brooks and he then returned to the mayor's office and barricaded it.

The testimony came on a day when the 12 Hanafis reiterated their determination to continue a protest fast that they started June 16. All but Khaalis filed a motion with Judge Nicholas S. Nunzio, who is presiding, stating that they "will not agree to accept any form of medical treatment designed to maintain life support systems during this period of fasting."

Nunzio told them he would not "let them use their fast to defeat the purposes of this trial."

Both officers said they heard screams and shouts from people inside the Council meeting chamber, where Council member Marion S. Berry was wounded.

Officer Donald C. Brooks, the mayor's bodyguard, told how he had gone to the Council office area when he first heard shots and saw a man armed with a shotgun standing inside an inner office. Brooks said he then returned to the mayor's office and barricaded it.

[TEXT OMITTED FROM SOURCE] he testimony came on day when the 12 Hanafis reiterated their determination to continue a protest fast that they started June 16. All but Khaalis filed a motion with Judge Nicholas S. Nunzio, who is presiding, stating that they "will not agree to accept any form of medical treatment designed to maintain our life support systems during this period of fasting."

Nunzio told them he would not "let them use their fast to defeat the purposes of this trial."

On Thursday, Nunzio read them a warning that he would continue the trial even if they become so weakened that they cannot attend it.

"The court will consider that you have knowingly, intelligently and intentionally waived your constitutional right to be present at each and every portion of the trial," the judge said.

In another development, United Press International reported yesterday that Nunzio had cited former Superior Court Judge Harry T. Alexander for contempt of court earlier this week. Alexander is Khaalis' defense attorney. There have been several sharp exchanges between him and Nunzio since the trial began May 31.

Alexander said last night that he would "neither confirm nor deny" the report. Nunzio has ordered all attorneys in the case to keep matters discussed at bench conferences confidential. It was at a bench conference last Wednesday that the action reportedly was taken.