Open daily from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., and on Sundays from 4 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Parking in small lot behind restaurant. Accepts Bankamericard, American Express and Central Charge. Accessible to wheelchairs.

We had a delicious and somewhat exciting dinner at Shahrazad one Tuesday evening. Just as we were seated, loud Arabic music started to play and a belly dancer appeared in the small area between out table and some others.

Our children were entranced. The dancer had bangles on her hips, bells on her toes, snake-like arm bracelets up to her shoulders, and lots of flowing scarves. She was a sedate rather than exotic dancer. We all enjoyed her shimmies and shakes, and especially her costume.

Once the entertainment was over, we looked at our surroundings. Shahrazad's ceiling is covered with billowing striped cloth, gathered to make the room look like a tent. Tables were covered with apricot cloths the lighting was dim. The room was divided into dining areas by large white leather banquettes.

The menu, like the decor and dancing, is Middle Eastern, with two American dishes available - roast beef and roast chicken. Given the beautiful decor and the live entertainment we were almost afraid to look at the prices, but Shahrazard is moderately priced. Except for the kabobs (shrimp, beef or lamb at $6.25 to 6.50), the entrees were $3.95 to $5.25 and included such tempting dishes as cous cous, krusa (squash stuffed with ground lamb), stuffed grape leaves, kibbeh (ground lamb) with cracked wheat and pine nuts), and malfuf (cabbage stuffed with ground lamb).

We started by sharing two appetizers, humos (ground chick peas) at $1.25 for a large order and stuffed grape leaves at $1.50. Both were accompanied by a large basket of hot pita bread. Our children wouldn't even try the grape leaves; they dipped pita bread in the humos once, and decided to munch on plain pita bread instead. We thought both dishes were excellent, although one small order of humos would have been enough to start the meal.

Salads came with a very tart lemon dressing - too tart for me, but my daughter, 11, announced it was the best salad she'd ever had.

For entrees we all tried a different Arabic dish. My son, 9, a meat and potatoes man, had lamb sheesh kabbob at $6.25. It was nicely flavored and broiled; there was nothing about it to scare a non-adventureous eater. My daughter tried kifta - lamb meat balls with tomato sauce and rice - for $4.50. The meatballs were light and well seasoned. After giving everyone a taste she was able to finish the course.

I had mouzzaleh - baked eggplant and rice in tomatoe sauce - at $4.75. It was so good I finished every drop. My husband hedged his bets and tried the 1,001 Night platter, for $5.95, which promised a taste of everything including sheesh kabob. He was disappointed. There wasn't enough of what he really liked the sheesh kabob, mouzzaleh and kibbeh) and too many stuffed grape leaves, which he'd already had as apetizer.

For dessert we shared one baklava, 75 cents, and one mhelalegah pudding, 65 cents. No one liked the pudding - it was bland and very starchy tasting. Those with a sweet tooth loved the baklava, concoction of pastry, nuts and honey. Arabic coffee is also available at 75 cents a cup.

The service was friendly and unrushed. Although our children hoped she would, the belly dancer did not return for encores.

Our tab for dinner, which included a half liter of white wine ($2.75) and two giner ales (40 cents each) came to $29.10.

Open daily from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., and on Sundays from 4 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Parking in small lot behind restaurant. Accepts Bankamericard, American Express and Central Charge. Accessible to wheelchairs.