Movies with titles like "Lesbian Lolita" and "Playgirls," featuring explicit and sometimes acrobatic sex, flickered across a screen yesterday before five Fairfax County civic association members and four local Baptist churchgoers.

The nine did not flinch. Two yawned. Another, a young college student, began balancing her checkbook during the 1 1/2 hours it took to show the home-movie quality films in a darkened courtroom at Fairfax County General District Court.

All nine had volunterred to view the eight nine-minute films confiscated from 25-cent peep shows at Crotan Books Inc., an adult bookstore at 8653 Richmond Hwy. The store was charged with eight counts of renting obscene films, and the nine persons were ready to testify that those films violated their community standards of decency and were therefore obscene.

"I think sex is just like sod," said volunteer Jacqueline Wells after viewing the films. "It's okay on the lawn, but when you bring it in and throw it on the living room floor, it's dirt, filth. There's a place for everything.

"We didn't (watch the films) because we enjoyed it, that's for sure," Wells said.

Fairfax County Commonwealth's Attorney Robert F. Horan Jr., in a continuing attempt to rid the county of adult book stores and movies, had charged the store corporation rather than an individual in order to strike at the financial source of the business, he said.

"The name of the game when you're talking about obscene material is money," Horan said in court yesterday. "You have to take the economic profit out of their activities. It's hard core pornoraphy for economic gain."

To convict an individual or corporation under Virginia's obscenity statute, it must be proven that the material violates a particular community's standards using guidelines set by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Taking the material as a whole, it must appeal to prurient interests, be patently offensive to the community and be without literary, artistic, political or scientific value to be deemed obscene.

But controversy usually arises in obscenity cases over what is considered a community, what its standards are and who is qualified to determine those standards.

In yesterday's case, four volunteers were from the Engleside Baptist Church in Mount Vernon and five were from local civic associations. Many of the nine have been in regular contact with police on the adult bookstore problem and were asked by police to testify.

What about those who may have different attitudes about obscenity and weren't asked by police to testify about community standards? Horan was asked by a reporter outside the courtroom.

"So?" the prosecutor replied. He said the volunteers accurately represented a cross-section of the community around the bookstore.

During yesterday's trial, Stanley M. Dietz, Crotan's attorney, argued that "nothing was depicted in those films that doesn't go on in the modern family's bedroom. In all goes back to your individual taste." Dietz said he had successfully defended Crotan in Fairfax twice, before.

The films themselves are vitually without plot. Some are so dark and crowded with participants that it is difficult to tell what is going on, but they show a wide variety of sexual activities.

Horan asked only one of the volunteers to testify: Donald Dinger, 41, am active member of the Mount Vernon High School PTA and founder of the Mount Vernon Civic Association.

Under Horan's questioning, Dinger said he had discussed community standards with friends - particularly the effects of movies on children. He said he had also attended an X-rated movie, "Misty Beethoven," which he said has been playing in his neighborhood 43 weeks, to help determine what his community's standards are.

Dietz objected to Dinger's testimony, arguing that he could not qualify as an expert on community standards. "Just because he's talked to his friends doesn't qualify him, just his little circle of friends," he argued.

Judge Robert M. Hurst overruled the objection and said, "Without me knowing what the community standards are, I can't apply them."

Dinger said that to the average person in his community the films "definitely" would show a shameful and morbid interest in sex, depict sexual conduct in a patently offensive way and go beyond the customary limits of candor in describing sex.

Judge Hurst found Crotan Books guilty on all eight counts and sentenced the corporation to the maximum fine of $1,000 for each offense.

Dietz said the fine would hurt Crotan. He said he will appeal the decision in a Circuit Court jury trial in the belief that juries are usually more favorable toward book stores than judges.