An obituary in Wednesday's editions of The Washington Post on Roland N. Bowie, 73, who died Monday, incorrectly stated the relationship between Mr. Bowie and his survivors. He was survived by five daughters, Valarie B. Kennard, of San Jose, Calif., Lois Davis, of Bladensburg, Carolissa Bowie, of Washington, Jacqueline Dacus, of Annapolis and Judy B. Bowie, of Washington, and three sons, Leroy Proctor Sr. and Robert S. Bowie Sr., both of Washington, and Roland N. Bowie Jr., of Alexandria. The Washington Post regrets the error.

Roland N. Bowie, 73, who earned the nickname "Dr. Bowie" in the 51 years he worked for the George Washington University Medical School, died Monday at Capital Hill Hospital. He had suffered from cancer.

Mr. Bowie earned that nickname one night in the 1950s, when the medical school hospital was located on H Street NW. He delivered a baby in the parking lot.

"I was helping more cars in the lot that night," he recalled on the occasion of his retirement in 1976. "I heard this moaning and groaning from one of the cars. A woman was in the back seat of a Diamond Cab, all alone. One of my kids was born at house, so I knew just what was happened. I told her she shouldn't waste energy hollering - she should grip hard and bear down. The cab driver had gone off to find a doctor and by the time he returned with one, a baby boy was born."

Mr. Bowie was born in Washington. He went to work at the university in 1925, and his first job was in the anatomy laboratory. At his retirement, he worked in the mail room.

Survivors include five sisters, Valarie R. Kennard, of San Jose, Calif., Lois Davis, of Bladensburg, Carolissa Bowie, of Washington, Jacqueline Dacus, of Annapolis, and Judy H. Bowie, of Washington, and three brothers, Leroy Proctor Sr. and Robert S. Bowie Sr., both of Washington and Roland X. Bowie Jr., of Alexandria.