Gerald G. Warren has set ideas about campaigning. "I'm not a buttons and bows man," said the former assistant county attorney who is running for the Republican nomination for Montgomery county executive.

"I don't believe in going out and interfering with traffic to give out campaign literature. That went out in the 50s. I've spoken to civic associations when I've been invited, I've filled out questionnaires promptly when I've gotten them, and I've received some endorsements.

"I think I can win this way, now and in November."

If Warren is right, Republican party regulars in Montgomery County are in for a surprise. At the moment, most party workers are expecting Richmond Max Keeney to be the party's nominee to fill the seat being vacated by Republican County Executive James P. Gleason.

According to several Republican observers, Warren, a 37-year-old Poolesville resident, has run such a low-key campaign that he barely has been noticed. "One of the things about this county is that the Republican primaries are won by precinct leaders," said state senator Howard A. Denis, the only Republican in the County's legislative delegation.

"Warren's campaign just hasn't got" ten through to the precincts or to the electorate," Denis added.

What Denis sees as a liability however - Warren's unfamiliarity with the party structure and the party's unfa- miliarity with him - Warren sees as an asset.

"I think people are going to be impressed by the fact that I'm a completely emancipated candidate, that I owe nothing to no one," Warren said. "I'm the only one of the Republican candidates who is out there every day representing all of the people of this county [when I'm] in court."

His opponents, Keene, and Albert Ceccone, "don't offer Republicans a choice," he continued. "I can appeal to the voters the Democrats normally appeal to, the true middle-class people."

"That's the whole point of this race, to show that the middle-class, the guy like me making between $16,000 and $25,000 a year is invaluable and indispensable. We've got to have a voice and stop this spend, spend, spend, tax, tax, tax syndrome," he said.

Warren said that he would have three major priorities if elected county executive:

Firing Police Chief Robert J. diGrazia and restructuring the county police department.

Making the school system raise its own tax revenues, instead of relying on county levies.

Implementing a referendum placed on the November ballot by the Tax Relief Inititative for Maryland, a referendum that would sharly cut back the county's property tax rate.

Some observers say that Warren is close to many rank-and-file members representing most of these officers re-

Warren said that he would have three major priorities if elected county executive:

Firing Police Chief Robert J. diGarzia and restructuring the county police department.

Making the school system raise its own tax revenues, instead of relying on county levies.

Implementing a referendum placed on the November ballot by the Tax Relief Inititative for Maryland, a referendum that would sharply cut back the county's Property tax rate.

Some observers say that Warren is close to many rank-and-file members of the county police force. The union representing most of these officers recently passed a vote of no confidence in diGrazia.

"I think we need a chief who has come up through the ranks, who has served this county for many years and knows it well," Warren said. "We don't need people coming from Boston [where diGrazia was police chief before he moved to Montgomery in 1976] and telling our police what to do.

"My first priority would be getting rid of diGrazia and all his Boston people," Warren said.

Warren, a native of Washington, graduated from Gonzaga High School and the University of Maryland. He finished law school at American University in 1966 and served as an assistant county attorney in Montgomery for three years between 1973 and 1976. Later he moved into private practice.

Asked about this, Warren's first campaign, one county Republican leader said, "Gerry's a good person, but I really don't think many people know that he's running. He just hasn't run very hard."

Asked about this, Warren's first campaign, one county Republician leader said, "Gerry's a good person, but I really don't think many people know that he's running. He just hasn't run very hard."

Warren agrees that he has not done much campaigning. For example, on the second to last Sunday before election day, he made no campaign appearances. He says he has done as much campaigning as his schedule has permitted.

Like many candidates running as "outsiders," Warren feels he has been given short shrift by area news outlets, particularly The Washington Post.

"Keeney is perceived to be the frontrunner because the media perceives him that way, that's all," Warren said. "My biggest disappointment in this campaign has been that the press and especially The Post seem to be part of the Democratic, political, social and financial elite."

Warren sees himself as the defender of the middle class in an era when, he says, the middle class is bearing the brunt of the financial responsibility in Montgomery County.

"I think it's time for some of the leaders in this county to start setting examples," he said. "The first thing I would do in office is cut the salaries of department heads like the county executive and the chief of police.

"The leaders in this country have to set an example if they're going to convince people to go along with taking smaller pay increases and spending less money."

Although he is considered an outsider who does not have a solid enough organization to even be a contender in this year's race, there are some Republicans who think Warren could be a serious candidate in the future.

In this campaign, Warren has been endorsed by the county's coalition of Civic Association presidents and the union representing school bus drivers, mechanics and cafeteria employes. He has also been endorsed by the Maryland chapter of Pro-Life, an antiabortion group.